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Vol. XXXIII. 



Annual Spring TV u m I 



e r 




Publication Office: Toronto, January, 1921 



No. I 




R'CHARD HAWORTH AND COMPANY. LIMITED. ENGLAfO 



I> IM (J O O D S KEVlh-W 



Kve«S^ 



Spring Styles in Suits and Coats 

Appear in Unusual Variety 



The young lady on the left is wearing 
one of our pastel shades — a delicate 
blue — Wool Polo Coat. Not only the 
fabric but every detail from the odd 
buttons to the unique change purse on 
the pocket spells "Newness." Many 
variations of this coat are shown in the 
pastel colorings as well as in camel's 
hair. 

You will like the black velveteen jacket 
in the centre — either separately or with 
our white flannel skirts or checked 
skirts. This is a most youthful tuxedo 
but others have the regular coat closing. 

At the extreme right is a distinctly new 
white flannel suit, tailored with every 
nicety of snug shoulders, trim sleeves 
and straight lines. 



But this gives you only a glance at our 
really unusual Spring line. We are 
showing plenty of other decidedly dif 
ferent models such as: 

A charming plaited skirt 
with plain box coat. 

Bright sweater coats with 
white flannel skirts. 

Really Truly Golf Suits. 

Worsted covert suits. 

Kenweave Jersey Suits. 




Ij/jf 7 """"" " i " 



C. Kenyon Co., Inc. 



Fifth Ave. Bldg. 
New York 



223 Jackson Blvd. 
Chicago 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



'Mmmmwrnu 



GREETINGS! 



A new era has just dawned. The one now closed was attended by 
readjustment of inflated values and a reversion to conservative ten- 
dencies. A change of any kind is always disturbing, but when it is for 
more stable conditions we are not only glad when it is over but glad 
that it has taken place. We still have unshaken confidence in the 
future of Canada and a belief in the early return of a healthy volume 
of business. 




WE HAVE REVISED OUR PRICES TO THE LOWEST POSSIBLE 
POINT. IN MANY LINES WE ARE ACTUALLY SELLING AT LESS 
THAN MANUFACTURERS' PRICES AND WE ARE PREPARED TO 
MEET ANY AND ALL COMPETITION. 



GREENSHIELDS LIMITED 

1 7 VICTORIA SQUARE, MONTREAL 
"Everything in Dry Goods" 



DRY GOO DS R E V I EW 







. Sins i£>tlk Company 

Himtteb 

"Zl>t g>ilfe $ous;e of Canaba" 

From Oriental Lands 

and other famous Silk-Producing 
(countries nave come the many 
aj>jiealing lines of Silks that we 
offer you in our 

Spring Display 

Plain Silks of lustrous sheen 
in rich tones of all the faofiular 
shades. Fancy and Txovelty Silks 
in effects of striking character and 
distinctive good taste. 

Silks without number to please the 
different tastes and needs you are 
called ufeon to meet ! 

WE OFFER YOU 

EXCEPTIONAL VALUES 

FOR IMMEDIATE AND 

SPRING SHIPMENT 

IN 

JAPAN 

ana 

CHINA SILKS 

CHARMEUSE 

DUCHESS SATINS 

GEORGETTES 

CREPE DE CHINES 

FANCY STRIPES 

PLAIDS 

FANCY TRIMMING 

SILKS 

<PYJAMA SILKS 

SILK SHIRTINGS 

ana 

WASH SATINS 



. l£mg £i>Ufe Company, Htmtteo 

59-61 VC^ellington Street West, Toronto 

Foreign Offices : 
Zurich, Switzerland Lyons, France 

Yokohama, Japan Chefoo, China 




m^3E^^Si^^ ^ft ^^ffi|imglSS^^^^^ffi^^^^™^^^^ ^SB 



1) R Y GOO DS R E V I K W 



Start the New Year 

Right 



For Your Mid-Winter Sales, come 
to us and see what we have to 
offer in specially priced lines of 



White and Grey Sheetings 

Pillow Cottons 

White Saxony Flette 

White Cottons and Longcloths 

Cambrics and Madapolams, 

Nainsooks, Lawns and 

Bridal Cloths, etc. 



1 



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SAMPLES SUBMITTED UPON REQUEST 



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John M. Garland, Son 
& Co., Ltd. 

Ottawa - Canada 

Wholesale Dry Goods 



DRY GOODS R E V I E W 




ROCK-BOTTOM PRICES 

are what interest Merchants and Consumers most. 

It doesn't matter what stock-in-hand costs, 
! it isn't worth any more than 'market prices. 

RACINE'S 1921 PRICES 

sent out this month 
mean 

Rock-Bottom Market Prices — The Lowest of the Low — 



AT THE POINT 

where you can safely buy and surely sell 
Get Busy Buying and you'll keep Busy Selling 




FOURTEEN DEPARTMENTS 



A — I "Hon Staples 

A\ — Flannelettes 

B— Wash Goods 

t — Woollens, etc. 

D — Linens 

E — Dress Goods and Silks 

F — Men's Underwear and Sweaters 



G — Home Furnishings 

H — Ladies' Hosiery and Underwear 

I — Men's Fancy Furnishings 

J — Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 

K — Smallwares and Notions 

L — Men's Fine Shirt> 

M — Workingmen'i" Wearables 



/^aa)?e *qmjted 



<y?se J\aane 

60-98 ST. PAUL STREET WEST, MONTREAL 

Manufacturers' and Wholesale Distributors of Dry Goods 



PERMANENT SALES OFFICES 
OTTAWA QUEBEC TORONTO HA1LEYBURY 

111 Sp*rk» Street Merger Building 123 Bay Street Matabanick Hotel 

SUDBURY SHERBROOKE THREE RIVERS 

Vickie Range Hotel 4 London Street 



Main Street 



SYDNEY, N.S. RIVIERE DU LOUP 

269 Charlotte Street Hotel Anctil 

CHARLOTTETOWN. P.E.I. 
Queen and Sydney Sts. 




FACTORIES: Beaubien St., Montreal; St. Denis, Que.: St. Hyacinthe, Que 



I) U V GOODS It E V I E W 



SUNDOUR 



UN FrtDABLE FABRICS 



BRITISH MADE 




Sundour 
Fabrics 

Sundour Casements 
Sundour Tapestries 
Sundour Chenilles 
Sundour Reps 



COLOURS GUARANTEED THE WORLD OVER 

after the Severest Tests in all Latitudes. 

The colour element in these World-known Fabrics is indestructible, 
and the finished Product — from coal tar anthracene to colour, and 
from raw material to beautiful Fabric is our own throughout. 

Originators and Sole Manufacturers : 



Sundour 
Fabrics 

Sundour Madras 
Muslin 
Sundour Rugs 



MORTON SUNDOUR FABRICS LTD, 

CARLISLE :: ENGLAND 

WHOLESALE & EXPORT: 89 NEWGATE STREET. LONDON. E.C. 1. 
Canadian Representative: G. I. KITCHEN, Bay St., TORONTO. 



DRY liOODS REVIEW 




If you would have 
Prosperity, hitch 
your chariot to the 
right star. 



BLUE 




STAR 



Products are a medium of 
success. They embody all 
that is beautiful, refined, 
clever and original in their 
own lines: 

LACES 

EMBROIDERIES 

DRESS TRIMMINGS 

GEORGETTES 

CHIFFONS 

WASH GOODS 

RIBBONS 

HOSIERY 

BRASSIERES 

HANDKERCHIEFS, ETC. 

Our salesmen will be starting 
out early in January with a 
full range of the above lines. 



illuger Jfrotfjera (Cattaba) Htmiteb 



New York 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Baltimore 

Los Angeles 

San Francisco 



Manufacturers and Importers of Laces 
Dress Trimmings and Embroideries 

Importers of Fancy Dry Goods 

12 ST. HELEN STREET 

MONTREAL 



London 

Nottingham 

Paris 

Calais 

Caudry 

LePuy 

St. Gall 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



It Pays to Sell The Hoover 



Ask Hoover dealers if it pays to sell The 
Hoover. They will tell you how many Hoovers 
their stores have sold the past year — and you 
will be agreeably surprised. 

They will tell you how easy it has been to sell 
Hoovers although many never sold electric 
cleaners before; how receptive the people are 
when The Hoover is mentioned; how it is the 
best advertised, best known, most called for 
cleaner in Canada. 

They will tell you how our men keep in con- 
stant touch with them; how they help them 
turn over their stocks; how ample is the adver- 
tising material we furnish them. 

They will tell you what satisfied users Hoover 
purchasers become; how users suggest friends 
as prospects; how free from trouble their 
Hoover business is conducted. 

Lastly, they will tell you of the large profits 
they have made on small investments. 

Ask Hoover dealers if it pays to sell The 
Hoover. Let their statements guide you in 
your verdict. 

The Hoover Suction Sweeper Company 
of Canada, Limited 

The oldest and largest makers of electric cleaners 
Factory and General Offices: Hamilton, Ontario 




Ever increasing pro- 
due tion of Hoovers in 
Canada is enabling us 
constantly to add new 
dealers. We have a very 
attractive proposition 
to present. No obliga- 
tion is attached to 
your inquiry 



>dhe HOOVER 



It Beats 



as it Sweeps 



as it Cleans 



Made in Canada by Canadians for Canadians 



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Done with the old — 




Unobstructed Vision 



181-199 CARLAW AVENUE 



TORONTO 



Jfri'fe /or Illustrations 



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DRY ( ! ( ) ( ) 1 ) S R E V L E W 



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Forward with the new ! 




^ 



No Shop-Worn Goods 

IfafcffiQm 

(jORONToSffOWCASFCo) Lfflftpd 



181-199 CARLAW AVE. 

TORONTO 



Write for Illustrations 



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FOR 
OJJALITY 

CJhere is no 
substitute Jor 
CJrue ^Trish 



[iner 



DRY GOODS RKVTKW 



11 



Do You Sell Just 'Linen' — 

or True Irish Linen 



For generations now the term "Irish Linen" has 
meant far more to the public than just ordinary 
linen. 

And Ireland has well earned this distinction. 

The linen workers there take a just pride in their 
famous merchandise. 

The buyer who is able to guarantee that his offering- 
is TRUE IRISH LINEN is assured that his mer- 
chandise will have a readier acceptance and that 
his guarantee will in a measure justify the price 
which he is forced to mark his goods. 

The buyer cannot afford to neglect — in these days 
of careful shopping — anything that will tend to 
stimulate confidence in Price, Quality and Value. 

To stabilize conditions in your linen department 
buy— sell— and feature TRUE IRISH LINEN. 



~\* IRISH LINEN SOCIETY 

BEL FAST IRELAND ^ggQ 

American Office and Information Bureau 
239 West 39th Street, New York 



- 



D R Y GOODS RE VI E W 



Do You 

Have Trouble Getting Sunset? 

Many retailers all over the country are complain- 
ing that their jobbers are continually out of stock 
— and we wish to state that there is absolutely no 
need for this condition. Your jobber can get 

Sunset SoapDyes 

In all colors—all the time 

We have large facilities and can make immediate 
shipments — if you are having trouble — write to 
our Sales Representatives for Canada 




Harold F. Ritchie & Co., Ltd 
Toronto, Canada 

North American Dye Corporation, Ltd 

Manufacturers 

Toronto, Canada 



i 1 ' |! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 in in || 1 1 nun 1 1 



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CANADIAN-MADE 

COTTON BATTING 




Order 

VICTORY BATS, NORTH 

STAR, CRESCENT AND 

PEARL 

Packed in Shipping Cartons, or in Bales 

The best value for the price. 

Can be had in 125, 100, 61 or 50 rolls 
to the bale or 124, 96, 64, or 48 to 
a lot of four cartons. 

ANY WHOLESALE HOUSE 



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DRY GOODS RE VIE W 



13 




Rare Values 

in 

Ladies' White 

Underwear 




Values that are instantly recognized sell more for us 
than volumes of superlatives. That is why we would 
rather have you see our splendid assortment than at- 
tempt, through glowing words, to convince you of its 
merits. 



The wide range of 
White Underthings for 
ladies we are now offer- 
ing includes: — 

Parisian Corsets, from 
$15.00 to $24^00. 

Corset Covers, $6.00 to 
$10.50. 

Chemises, $12.00 to 
$15.00. 

Cotton Drawers. $7.00 
to $10.50. 

C o 1 1 <> n Underskirts, 
$16.50 to $24.00. 




We have also a very 
attractive line of— 

Cotton Nightgowns, 
from $12.50 to $18.00. 

Kimonas, $15.00 to 
$45.00. 

Silk Waists at $30.00, 
and 

White Voile Blouses. 
$12.00 to $16.50. 



P. P. MARTIN & CO., LIMITED 

50 ST. PAUL STREET WEST, MONTREAL 



Quebec: 9 and 11 Rue Charest, Tel. Bell 2545 
Sherbrooke: 103 Wellington St.. Tel. Bell 34 
St. Hyacinthe: 234 Carcade St., Tel. Bell 541 



Ottawa: 25 Sparks Street, Tel. Queen 3874 
Three Rivers: 82 Royal Street, Tel. Bell 362 
Toronto: 152 Bay Street. Tel. College 3535 



14 P I! Y COODS REVIEW 




^G IN D$y ] 

# FANCY GOODS O 
\> SMALLWARES <T 

1 1 DEPARTMENTS 

A.C-COTTON STAPLES M ._ LAC ES, RIBBONS, 

D.-DRESS GOODS AND HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

SILKS R.— READY-TO-WEAR 

F -^ S n! P r° RTING S.-SMALLWARES 

GOODS, Etc. 



H.— HOSIERY 

L.— LINENS, HANDKER- 
CHIEFS 



U.— UNDERWEAR 
W.— WOOLLENS 



All orders shipped same day as received. 

We give special attention to Letter Or- 
ders, Telegrams and Long Distance 
Orders. 

MAIL ORDER FORMS 

sent on request. 

HODGSON, SUMNER & CO., LIMITED 

83-91 St. Paul St. W. 21 St. Sulpice St. 84-92 LeRoyer St. 

MONTREAL 

SAMPLE ROOMS: 

7 Charest St., QUEBEC Windsor Hotel, OTTAWA 

Carlaw Bldg., 28-30 Wellington St. W., TORONTO 

Can. Bank of Commerce Bldg., THREE RIVERS Metropole Building, SHERBROOKE 

503 Mercantile Bldg., VANCOUVER 50 Bon Accord St., MONCTON, N.B. 



i) n v <; oo ds r E v i E w 



L5 




Made 

in 

Four 

Sizes 

000 

00 



1 



♦♦♦■»44»0»0'3>»0»'»»»$4»40^4»4»»4»4>«»»»»4<>»0<»4»^.<»4 



COLONIAL MAID 





*$ SIZE <» 

4. ^- <'♦*•♦♦ 





DRESS V^ FASTENER 

MADE IN CANADA 



&&<§>Q<§&®&i 



It's all in 
the Spring 




Strong — 
Durable 
Made of 
Brass 



It's a Snap to Snap This Snapper 

Colonial Maid 

Wire Spring Dress Fasteners 



Made in 
Canada 



HIS IS NOT A 
FRICTION FASTENER 

B. * MADE 
Ut IS WITH 
HIGHLY TEMPERED 

wire spring m m 

KNOWS WHEN TO HOLD 
AND WHEN TO LET GO 



BRASS 

will not 
rust 



ALSO PUT UP IN ONE GREAT GROSS 
CABINETS ASSORTED 24 CARDS EACH 
WHITE AND BLACK .-. .\ SIZES: 00-0-1 

To be had of all leading wholesalers. 

Manufactured by 

Colonial Fastener Co., Limited 

Montreal, Que. 




n; 



P K V GOODS R E V I K \\ 




This Device Identifies "Old Bleach" 
Pure Irish Linen Damasks 

"OLD BLEACH" itself is identified with all that is 
supreme in Irish linen quality, beauty and workmanship — 

— Quality assured by the exclusive use of pure selected 
flax yarn. 

— Beauty secured by the old fashioned sun, wind and grass 
bleach — really artistic designs, and soft lustrous finish. 

-Good Workmanship the result of infinite care and close 
inspection. 

Identify your linen department with "OLD BLEACH" 

linens. With "Quality" as a leader "Satisfaction" follows. 



/'- /y~ — r£ 

GUABANTZZ 

redly agree to re- 
place ■ ith which 
for any reason irbafsoever the 

-;iV: - fi<-'], pro- 
Id th<- 
■r«i Tra<l<- Mark 
or woven bran< 



/>.J< Ir.jd.Mark 

13-25 East 96™ Street Now York. 

P J.R.I.AMONT MANAGER Q c> 



Canadian Representative: 

W. II. STELEY, 22 West Wellington Street, Toronto, Ont. 




DKY GOOD'S REVIEW 



17 




%c OlovPS and IHoSlGCy 7/oU6G <gf Gtxnach 



" Make Sure of Your 
Requirements " 

THE demand for Venus Thread 
Silk Hosiery is increasing each 
season in greater proportion than 
our output, so we strongly urge the 
necessity of ordering your Fall, 
1 92 1, requirements when our repre- 
sentative calls. 

Venus Silk Hosiery Mills 



Limited 



Toronto 



Ontario 






■■ ■■:.':■" "'■'"■'■ ; ' 


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The Latest Creation In 



lueetO, 





Silk Lingerie 

is the "Pettibocker," which has all 
the advantages of a petticoat plus 
the snug-fitting comfort of a 
knicker. 

A display of these in your depart- 
ment will create demand. 

St. Catharines Silk Mills 

Limited 

ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO 




Selling Aqent 

d L.Baker 

WeUiugton S 
Toronto 







DRY G OOPS RE V 1 E \Y 




7/osibty 7/ou^r / 1t1t * • :>ob 



2±-J 



Buy Carefully 
But BUY! 

And Keep Canada Busy 

IS a good motto to keep in mind and in the other fellow's 
mind. Give it all the publicity possible. It will help 
everybody. 1 here is only so much money in the world, and 
only a part of that in Canada. It must be kept in constant 
circulation if business is to live — your business and ours. 

Business depression is but a state of mind. If we all BUY 
carefully, there need be no depression. 



IONDONKN1T 

Hose 



IQNDONfADY TONDONFASS fONDONIAD IONDONMAN 

clilZ LONDON HOSIERY MILLS Limited ^og 











MA. NY merchants have put off buy- 
ing for Spring until after Christmas 
selling, but we now urge the immediate 
consideration of your requirements for 
Spring and to get your order in early, to 
insure having the goods in stock when 
the demand is on. 





WW 

Limited 

TORONTO ONTARIO 



Sole Selling A __ 

Richard L.Baker 
64 Wellington S 
Toronto 




i v i j r J. 









■*- 



FACT/ 



prove 












W 




P.S. The facts have been mailed to 
over 3^d,dod merchants of North 
America— Received Yours ? 

THE T.K.KELLY SALES SYSTEM 



DRY GOODS R E V 1 E W 




Interchangeable 

Spring Announcement 



Here is a Spring 
Opening Announce- 
ment m> made that 
the illustrations may 
all be used in one ad. 
or changed around to 
make any one" of live 
different ads. 




The Merchants Service leads throughout the 
world, being used extensively in the United 
es, Canada, Mexico. Cuba. South America, 
Hawaii. Alaska, England, Scotland, South 
Africa, Australia, X< w Zealand — and also in 
the British colonic- elsewhere. 







OPENING- 

StyWom for Spring 1921 

blcnji wmy wuthcm fc™. 
•* «o(l drape-kit™ n iwly 

»Uth »t fracal (a yaw 

»■ Wnra/j y <W TkufJ*-, 
Jtbrutry Saltntt W JnmmwA 

STORE NAME HERE 


I 


OffiNING 

Sty!«Jom for Spring 1031 
tijJlTiil nr'i 

.U.,|«wlk.y«. 

qpmd 

ll'dvuir, W ThutvLiy 

STORE NAME HERB 










Newest Spring Styles 

Prompt Service 
Delivered from Montreal 



Made in Canada 

The Merchants Service leads 
because it is practical, correct 
in style, rightly merchan- 
and the cuts are 
economically sized to the 
type- of merchandise illus- 
trated, 



OPENING 



rBM '-AMi MriF 




CHEWING 



SlyUora lot Sprir^ 1921 






3TOIE NAME HERE 




The Mei'chants Sei'vice is the one distinc- 
tive style service. Every garment, hat or 
other feature shown in the illustrations is 
not only of an authoritative style, but the 
new styles are illustrated so well in advance 
that you have the cuts when you first show 
your new goods. 

All orders received this month will also be 
accompanied by the complete Interchange- 
able Spring Announcement illustrations in 
all sizes, miniatures of which are shown 
here. To get this material with the com- 
plete matrixes for all illustrations and ad. 
copy for February advertising, fill out the 
coupon and mail in at once. 



Used Exclusively by 
One Merchant in a Town. 



! MERCHANTS SERVICE, 

I 239 West 39th St., 
I New York City. 

I Please send us a specimen set of proof books, bulletin, copy, etc., of your Spring 
' advertising service for February for our examination, showing the big Spring Open- 
| ing Announcement. We are interested in getting an advertising service for 
[ ] Department Store Dry Goods Store | | Ready-to-Wear Store 

[ ] We can use mats [ ] We can use cuts only 

I It is understood that there is no obligation either way in sending this to 

J Name 

| Address 

I City 



DIM' GOODS REVIEW 21 







I 



Mclntyre, Son & Co. 

LIMITED 

Montreal :: :: Canada 
The SPECIALTY HOUSE of CANADA 

Dress Goods 

Silk Fabrics 

Linens 
Hosiery 

Gloves 

Underwear 

Cotton Dress Materials 
Art Draperies 

Knitted Goods 

Ribbons and Laces 

Handkerchief 

Embroideries 



0P£€ 



"Niagara Maid" Silk Products 

"Trefousse" Kid and Suede Gloves 

"Kirby, Beard & Co." Smallwares 

Particular attention to Mail Orders and Enquiries. 







Sales Offices: 




TORONTO 




OTTAWA 


HAMILTON 


LONDON 




PETERBORO 


MONCTON 


HALIFAX 




QUEBEC 


WINNIPEG 


REGINA 




EDMONTON 
VANCOUVER 


CALGARY 




Head Office and Warehouse 




13 Victoria 


Square 




Montreal 



I 



£2£ 



ni;v coons r E V i E \v 




SUITS 



Made From 

HAWTHORN JERSEY 




They SELL! — twelve months 



i 






! \ 




in a year 



I 



—because Jersey fashions vary 
so little from season to season 
and from year to year that 
they are always in style. 

— because the prices are mod- 
erate and their uses unlimited. 

— because they hold their smart 
style and pretty lines through 
many seasons' wear. 

— because when made from 
Hawthorn Jersey, they are 
damp-proof, will not sag, 
bunch nor wrinkle, and are 
extremely wear-resistant. 

Order from your suit and cloak 
manufacturer for ready-to-wear 
garments and from your whole- 
saler for cloth to sell by the 
vard. 




HAWTHORN MILLS LIMITED 

WOOLLEN MAXU ACTURERS 

CARLETON PLACE, ONTARIO 



DRY GOODS R E V I E W 



2:; 



The Silk House Which Always Leads 

"SAYS" 

BE OPTIMISTIC 

"PREPARE FOR A WONDERFUL SEASON" 

On the Occasion of Our Removal to Our New Premises 




BOURCIER BUILDING 

VICTORIA SQUARE, - MONTREAL 

All Customers visiting us between the dates of January the 20th and March 1st will be given 

very special prices. 

MR. BUYER 

Get wise and take advantage of this wonderful offer. 

SILKS 

By the Yard, by the Piece, by the Case, by the Car-Load. 

J. O. BOURCIER, LTD. 

MONTREAL 

BRANCHES: TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 

TO OUT OF TOWN BUYERS : When coming to Montreal make our premises your headquarters. Have your mail and telegrams 
addressed in our care — same will be carefully looked after. 



DRY GOODS B E V 1 E W 




This View will give an idea of size of our Salesrooms. 

Drop in Regularly! 

Let us show you lines that will make you money. 

We have some extra good lines for Spring in — 

VEILINGS, VEILS, LACES, NETS, FLOUNCINGS, 

MALINES-30C 

"MONA LISA" VEILS (4,000 Dozen) 

"VODENE" HAIR NETS 

FANCY VOILES 

ORGANDIES 

Samples on request — Salesmen on the way 

Canada Veiling Co., Limited 

84-86 Wellington Street West 

TORONTO 

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DRY GOODS REVIEW 



25 




26 



DRY COOPS REV] EW 




P. (. Blatchly 
WeMern On'aric 




H. H. Tillman 
Ottawa 




J. E. Labrosse 
Montreal 




W. E. Campbell 
Montreal 



F. L. Couch 
Western Ontario 



W. K. McArthur 
Western Ontario 



D. W. Mcintosh 
Sales Manager 




WE take pleasure in herewith pre- 
senting to the merchants of Canada 
our sales force, members of which 
will call on you during the coming season. 
Behind their efforts to serve you with what 
you want is our staff of buyers which makes 
periodic European buying trips on which 
are selected the lines of merchandise which 
have gone far towards popularizing our 
house with the retail trade of the 
Dominion. 

You will find our salesmen courteous 
and attentive to your every want. We 
feel assured your warm reception of them 
will result in our mutual advantage. 



Ladies Wear, Limited 

W. F. Gofortk 



A. K Mackaney 
Maritime Provinces 



I) R V G 00 DS R E V I E VV 

1; 




W. E. Warham 
Northern Ontario 



N. Beaton 
Toronto 



CERVICE. That is our 1921 
^-^ motto. The advantages of the SER- 
VICE we aim to provide are found not 
alone in the excellent quality of our 
merchandise, but also in the prices we are 
this year able to quote the trade. 

Our buyers are in close touch with all 
parts of the world. Our salesmen are in 
close touch with you. We can supply 
you with goods of style without experi- 
ment, and quality without extravagance. 

To perfect our SERVICE, co-operation 
is required ; and it is our hope that by 
your taking advantage of our SERVICE 
we may be enabled to further improve it. 



C. G. Sinclair 
Toronto 



563 College St., Toronto 



President 



W. McMillan 
Winnipeg 




P. H. Showier 

Western Manitoba and 

Eastern Sask. 




R. B. Snell 
Saskatchewan 




C. R. Hind 
Northern Alberta 















- ffmnfSi 






: . -f*M 






* ^BK 








ZL-* 





H. W. Martin 

Southern Alberta and 

Interior B. C. 




28 



I) \l Y G 00 DS R E \' 1 E W 




"MOYER MAID" 

Swiss Ribbed Vests 



Women, Misses and Children 

Fit, finish and long wear are the primary factors that appeal to wear- 
ers of vests. "Mover Maid" combine these features in making de- 
pendable vests at prices consistent with public demand. 

Give your customers the values "Mover Maid" stand for, and await the 
results— they will speak for themselves. 

Do not miss seeing our samples. 



CANADIAN AGENTS: 



Manufactured by 

WALTER W. MOYER 

EPHRATA, PA. 



HAROLD F. WATSON, FOSTER Limited 

208 CORISTINE BLDG.. MONTREAL 




DYNAMO BRAND 



By this Mark you are enabled to 
recognise MALINES which can- 
not be equalled in Quality— absolute 
Exclusiveness and Economy. 



MONTREAL 
Room 705 

Read Wdg. 
Tel. Main 6524 



"Dynamo Brand" Malines 

Are guaranteed Rainproof. They resist Rain — Dampness — 
Snow — Sun and Perspiration. 

They excel where others fail, and they naturally become the 
ideal Maline for Millinery and for Maline Scarves, so appro- 
priate for evening wear. They are economic, because one 
yard of Dynamo Maline offers more advantages than two 
yards of any other make. Buy Dynamo Maline, it is the 
Original Guaranteed Rainproof Maline. 

CHAS. MOUTERDE {United Makers) 

The only selling agents for Gros Million & Co. of Lyons(Franc e) for the 
Dominion of Canada. We only sell to the Wholesalers. 



80 Wellington 

St. West, 

TORONTO 

Tel. Adel. 4184 



DRY <;<)() I)S 1! E V 1 E W 



•J '.) 



IIIllll|||||||||||JII 



Spring offers many new and novel effects 

which we are now showing for your inspection 



LACES 



Collar points in fine guipure effects, also large 
range of guipure edges in varying widths. Fine 
Yals., Torchons, etc. (Immediate delivery). 



VEILINGS 



Individual veils in square and oblong designs 

are the vogue for this season. We have them 

chenilled, in self and two-tone effect. 

See our line of fancy Slip-on veils in black and 

colors. Excellent designs and values. Staple 

and fancy veilings by the yard. (Immediate 

delivery). 



EMBROIDERIES 

Full range, from narrow cambric edges up to 
27 and 45" flouncings, the latter including nov- 
elty ideas in voiles, etc. (Immediate delivery). 



HANDKERCHIEFS 

A large range of fancy embroidered lace edged 
effect, in open stock for Easter or Xmas trade 
as required. Also a large range of fancy boxed 
Nos. attractively put up for Xmas selling. 
Staple Nos. in cotton and linen for men and 
ladies. Also initial Nos. for immediate or 
later, as required. 



WESTLAKE BROTHERS 

LIMITED 



24 Wellington St. West 



xNOUsJ 






TORONTO 




\J O RAND J 




Travellers 

now 

out 



Our Trade progressed with the Haugh line of garments 
because the value was there. They could meet the wishes 
of their customers in supplying them with goods of merit. 
Buy from the house of known goods and values, and be 
with us in 1921 — Canada's Banner Year. 

New Prices 

Policy the same 

Better-made Garments 

The J. A. Haugh Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

TORONTO, CANADA 

Manufacturers of Trousers, Overalls, the famous 
"Arm & Hammer Brand" Shirts — Kiddies' Garments 



30 



MKY GOODS IIKVIKW 






w 



e re 



off 



to 



NOW we're talking business ! Early in the New Year our 
Travellers are starting out with samples of our Spring range 
of — Metallic Laces, Handkerchiefs, Silk Lingerie, Embroider- 
ies, and a new line of Children's Dresses — for your inspection. 

We feel confident that these lines offer you values that will 
stand critical comparison with any being offered on the 
Market — and come out on top ! 



You Will Like the New 

Dresses for Children 
Two to Six 



They have just the touches that make every mother want 
to buy them for her kiddie — dainty bits of hand-stitchery 
and clever yet simple styles; very appropriate for children. 

As for materials, they are the best wash fabrics to be 
found — dimities, lawns, voiles, nainsooks, cotton novelties 
and advertised materials. 

To stimulate business in your children's and infants' wear 
departments, feature the RITCHIE Dresses. 

White and Colors 
Sizes — 2 to 6 years. 




H. P. Ritchie &? Company 

Manufacturers — Metallic Laces — Handkerchiefs — Silk Lingerie 



l 



I) l!V (! ()() I)S UK V I E W 



:;i 



^333- 



-CZ3- 



-g£>» 



a good start! 



Metallic Laces 

in a fascinating array of 
beautiful designs that 
would supply unusual dis- 
tinction and richness to 
any smart costume. 



Handkerchiefs 

A long list of merits has placed Ritchie- 
made Handkerchiefs in the front ranks 
of the Handkerchief Army. A thor- 
oughly Canadian-made line, and 
worthy of the distinction — in value and 
smartness. 



Embroideries 

From tiny edges for wee 
baby garments, to skirt 
width flouncings, Ritchie 
Embroideries offer designs 
to meet every need — and 
every taste. 




Convenient — Comfortable — Serviceable 



"Silk Undies" 

For Spring and Easter 

— and then there's the June Bride! 

Dainty Ritchie creations with that unmistakable 
stamp of beauty and distinctiveness so important to 
every careful dresser, and withal made with a view 
to serviceability and long wear. 

With so many designs selection is made easy — designs 
that are lace trimmed, ribbon trimmed, hemstitched, 
hand-embroidered — all showing delightful touches of 
individuality. 

White, flesh and other dainty colors, in an endless 
variety of — 

CAMISOLES 

ENVELOPES 

NIGHT GOWNS 
NEGLIGEES 
STEP-INS 

BLOOMERS 

UNDERSKIRTS 



38-42 Clifford Street Toronto 

— Embroideries — and a new line of Children s Dresses 



1) R Y G OO DS K E \' 1 E W 



WHY? 

Why is A. B. C. Hosiery profitable for merchants and satis- 
factory for customers? 

In cashmere stockings customers want quality, durability, 
and neat fit linked with economy. Merchants want hosiery 
that meets these demands, and allows a fair profit. And that 
is what they get in 

A.B.G. HOSIERY 

For Men, Pf^omen and Children 



The best yarns combined with skill in manufacture give this 
hosiery quality and durability, and make it profitable stock to 
carry. 

Every pair seamless, with reinforced heels and toes. 

Children's Hosiery — 1 & 1 rib, sizes 4 to 10. 
Women's Hosiery — Flat stitch, perfect fit. 
Men's Half Hose — All sizes, elastic cuff. 

Colors in black, white, browns and red. 



ALLEN BROS. CO. 

LIMITED 

883 Dundas Street East 

TORONTO 

Selling A gents for Canada: 

Wm. G. Evis & Co. 

28 Wellington Street West : : Toronto 



"Canadian Goods are Better 




I) R Y (i ()() DS R E V I E W 



33 



Our 
New Line 



A new Line of Winsome Maid Hosiery 
which has quickly won favor, is^a two- 
tone headier effect in sill: and mer- 
cerized. This line comes in live dif- 
ferent combinations of colors, and is 
beautiful and durable. Woven with 
back seam, it fits perfectly. 

When ordering this line from us, 
specify 

Number 400 

Some of our other popular lines are: 

For Women 

No. loo — 12-thread pure silk; 18 to 19 
inches silk boot, with hem top. 

No. 140— 12-thread pure silk: 18 to 19 
inches silk boot, with elastic rib top. 

No. 250— lo-thread pure silk: 21 to 22 
inches silk boot, with hem top. 

For Men 

No. 1000— 12-thread pure silk half- 
hose. 

No. 444 — Two-tone heather effect in 
silk and mercerized half-hose. 

Our representative will call on you 
shortly with full range of Spring- 
samples. Orders sent by mail receive 
prompt and careful attention. 




Selling Agents: 

Wm. G. Evis & Company, 28 Wellington St. West. 
Toronto, Western and Northern Ontario, Que- 
bec, Maritime Provinces and Manitoba. 

Stanley McLeod, 543 Granville St., Vancouver, 
B.C., British Columbia, Alberta and Sas- 
katchewan. 

H. Switzer, 193 Sparks St., Ottawa, Eastern On- 
tario and Montreal. 



ALLEN SILK MILLS LIMITED 

43 Davies Avenue, Toronto 

"CANADIAN GOODS ARE BETTER" 



:U 



n i! v goods Review 



Keep Your 

Eye Open 
For Our Spring Samples 

Travellers will be on the road early in February 






HARRIS WENER 
President 




MAXWELL CUMMINGS 
Sales Manager 



MAURICE SAMUELS 
Designer. 









JL 



A k 



J. S. PERRY 
Prince Edward Island 



LAWRENCE WENER 
Montreal City 



ALFRED ROSE 
Quebec Province 



J. CARRICK 
Maritime Provinces 







G. W. NOLAN 
B.C.. Alta., Sask. 



A. MASSEY 
Eastern Ontario 



P. MILLER 
Western Ontario 



'H. E. B. STUART 
B.C.. Alta., Sask. 



Our prices are in line with conditions of to-day 
New Goods — Large Assortments -- Prompt Shipments -- Satisfaction 

The Montreal Waterproof & Clothing- Co., Ltd. 

The Largest and Oldest Waterproof Clothing House in Canada 

MONTREAL 



I) K V (!()() DS i; E V I E w 



35 





Note the 

TRADE 

MARK 



inUTU'BJTUUIUliJIUlinUlUUJTUlUUJUHUlUIU'W 



The Goods Behind 
The Mark 

A good trade-mark is an invention of immense 

worth. Yet let us not over-estimate its value. 

A good trade-mark will sell the article once, 

the merit of the article which will sell it time and time 



We know our trade-mark is good and we know — and you know too — 
that our goods are worthy of the high standard it stands for. 

We, therefore, look forward to 1921 with confidence that it will see 
the development of ever-increasing business to our mutual benefit. 

ECOVEL— Velveteen LA MODE— Velveteen 

URBANUS— Dress Cloth DOROTHY— Voile 

WOVIC — Underwear for Women 




AMI/^AIAVAIAI AVAVAi Ai A^Al Ai^^TEX 



CROCKERS E D 

'Jfrjc/dy Street 



¥ 




DRY HOODS REVIEW 




manufacturers of HABERDASHERY &SMALLW ARES 

Owning ten of the best equipped modern factories in Great Britain 
producing many specialities known throughout the world, such as : 












HURCU LACES— the British Laces 
for Boots and Shoes — made under 
the most approved methods of 
manufacture, the secret of their durability 
being the great strength of the threads 
which tenaciously cling together and 
resist wear. STRENGTH & DURABILITY. 



MENDING WOOLS & SEWING 
COTTONS. The St. George's 
and Crusoe All-Wool Mendings 
are noted for their softness and Strength 
in wear, their Smoothness in working, 
and their high quality and finish. Crusoe 
Cottons are an equally famous line. 



NAME LABELS, HANGERS and 
LOOPS for Coats, Shirts, Mantles, 
etc. This is a notable speciality 
of ours. 



SPHERE HOSE SUPPORTERS for 
Ladies Wear, enjoy the widest popu- 
larity because tKeir quality throughout 
is the finest possible. Made and finished 
with thoughtful attention to detail. Each 
pair fitted with the famous " Grip that 
grips and never slips." SPHERE Suspen- 
ders, Garters and Arm Bands for Mens 
Wear are supplied in many neat and attrac- 
tive designs; also Sphere Brownies, 
the Hose Supporters for Little Folks. 

ELASTICS : The St. George's Brand 
Elastics, including the. well-known 
" Violet" Quality, Braids, Cords, 
Garter and Loom Elastics. 

COTTON WEBBINGS and BIND- 
INGS : Skirt Bindings (single and 
duplex), Glace Bindings, Tapes, 
Galloons, Stay Bindings, Hat Bindings, etc. 



Here yon have the fast selling lines, the lines for YOU. 

I WHOLESALERS. -Get in touch with us AT ONCE for fuller particulars of 
ALL OUR LINES. - We will do our part with prompt service. 



mi.m in 1.1:1:11111111 111111:1:1:1 



HOLbSALE ONLY: 



FAIRE BRO s & Co., Ltd., LEICESTER, 



LONTX >N Fa. re Bros. &. Co.. Ltd., 19 Fore Street. E.C. 2. 
SOUTH AFRICA: Davie*. Gnodde & Smith. 1 Strand Street. 

Port Elizabeth. 
MELBOURNE; Alfred F. Smith. 2 Fink's Building*. Elizabeth 

Srreet. Melbourne. 
SYDNEY: Alfred F. Smith, 39 Queen Victoria Buildings, 

George Street. 



ENGLAND. 



CHRISTCHURCH: Robert Malcolm, Ltd.. 7" Lichfield Street. 

Also Auckland, WellinBron, Tun-Jin. 
BOMBAY : F. A. Filmcr &. C >..('.:. <tv Buildings. Hornbv Road. 
NORWAY : FIcrmod Riis, Ur -v Wc-dols Plass 4. ( hrbtiania. 
SWEDFN: Anrlo-Amenkan-kj Import A.B. Skeppsbron 3, 

Go'henburp. 
DENMARK : / J< If Eerendt, St K* rig nsgade 36/8, Copcnhag-- 



DRY HOODS KliVIKW 





The Disposal Board have 

STOCKS 

lying in the United Kingdom and 

AVAILABLE FOR EXPORT 

of Engineering Stores 



Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals 
Plant and Machinery 
Steam Engines and Boilers 
Factory Stores 
Machine Tools 
Railway Material 
Contractors' Stores 






Electrical Instruments and Machinery 
Boots and Leather Equipment 
Motor Boats, etc., etc. 



Buyers should instruct their representatives in the United Kingdom to 
communicate with the Secretary, Disposal Board, Ministry of Munitions, 
Caxton House, Tothill Street, London, S.W. 1. 

Cable address "DISPEXPORT, MUNORGIZE, LONDON" 




Medical Stores 
Chemicals and Explosives 
Motor Vehicles 
Agricultural Machinery 
Aircraft 
Furniture 
Textiles and Clothing 



; 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



MOTHE 




ADE SECTION 




Mead. On ice :• 

STAMFORD 5T. 
LEICESTER. 

T«U$rams>3!AR}'iS Itiuster. 
Telephone 2^J0-l Leicester. 

American. Afl<mt$ :- 

J&W. BASTARD 

(BOSTOH)O. 
1S4 SUMMER ST 
BOSTON^ U.S.A. 

Bradford Office :- 

195/6 SWAN ARCADE, 
BRADFORD. 



fltf 



/ 



J 



jm }/ <& 






l *W BASTARD 

"^ SPINNERS 

LEICESTER. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



39 





Manufacturers and Merchants 

119 WOOD STREET, LONDON, E.C. 2, ENGLAND 



REGD. 







LINES THAT ARE TRUSTED ALL 
OVER THE WORLD 



"OBERON" 
UNDERWEAR 

Brettle's famous brand, made in all 
garments and all sizes for Men, Youths 
and Boys, is recognized by progressive 
Outfitters and Drapers everywhere as 
being one of the most leading and re- 
liable lines of British Underwear. 
Here are a few reasons why: 
"OBERON" Underwear is woven from 
high grade yarns of soft yet durable 
quality. It is amply cut and neatly, 
yet strongly, seamed. "OBERON" 
Underwear looks and IS cosy and com- 
fortable — giving the wearer complete 
satisfaction. 

"OBERON" 
MEN'S SOCKS 

are made in a wide and varied range of 
Silks and Black, Colors and Embroidered 
Cashmeres. We are constantly adding 
new lines, thus ensuring that the selection 
is always up-to-the-moment with the trend 
of fashion. "OBERON" Men's Socks — in 
common with every "OBERON" produc- 
tion — represent always the utmost value. 



Samples at the 

Western Provinces: 
Mr. G. E. Ledder, 

62 Grace Court, Cornox St., 
Vancouver - B.C. 



Addresses below : 
Eastern Provinces: 

Marshall & Harding* 

Carlaw Bldg., 

Wellington St. W., 

Toronto 



GEORGE BRETTLE & CO., LTD. 

119 WOOD STREET, LONDON, E.C. 2, ENGLAND 



|M 



DRY GOODS K E V I E W 




1747 



1921 




RELIABILITY— 

the Essential of Success 

FROM introducing the tape-weaving industry into Staf- 
fordshire in 1747 the business of J. & N. PHILIPS 
& CO., LTD., has grown from a few hand looms into 
the vast premises of to-day, which now supply every kind 
of Dry Goods Merchandise — bearing testimony to an organiz- 
ation which has, as the foundation of its success, value in 
Merchandise and efficiency in control. 



The existence of a commercial 
business for over a century and 
a half is certain proof that it 
has served its clients well, and 



the premier position held by 
the firm to-day is a tribute to 
the fact that it has kept abreast 
of the times. 



Buy from the House with Over lyo Years' Reputation 
SEVEN REIGNS: George II. to George V. 

EVERYTHING FOR THE DRAPER 



J. ff N. PHILIPS & CO., LIMITED 

MANCHESTER 



DRY GOODS RE.VIEW 



11 




CABLES: 

"Phil Manchester" 

CODES: 

J. B.C., 5th Edition 
Lieber's, Corby's 
Bentley's 

Marconi 



^hlC 







MILLS \NI> 
FACTOR IKS 

Tean, Cheadle 

Arkwright, Congleton 

Manchester 

Newton Heath 

Etc. 



LIST of the MERCHANDISE 



OF WHICH WE ARE 



jVIanufacturers, Jyferchants & Exporters 



Sateens 

Linenettes 

Printed Linings 

Grey Calicoes 

Grey Sheetings 

Striped Flannelettes 

White Calicoes 

White Sheetings 

Flannels and Blankets 

Linens and Towels 

Dyed Flannelettes 

Shirtings 

Muslins 

Furniture Prints 

Prints 

British Dress Goods 



Foreign Dress Goods 

Velvets and Velveteens 

Quilts 

Coloured Table Cloths 

Lace and Lace Curtains 

Fancy Hosiery 

Plain Hosiery 

Gloves 

Ribbons 

Corsets 

Handkerchiefs 

Neckwear 

Umbrellas 

Shawls and Skirts 

Mantles 

Straws 



Millinery 

Flowers 

Buttons 

Furs 

Fancy Haberdashery 

Jewellery 

Haberdashery 

Smallwares 

Boots and Shoes 

Carpets 

Oilcloths 

Linoleums 

Gents' Shirts 

Ready-Made Clothing 

Blouses 

Underclothing 



MONTREAL 

Mr. W. F. Macoun 

211 Lindsay Buildings 



CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES: 

VANCOUVER 

Mr. A. F. Houston 

801 Credit Foncier 

Buildings 

850 Hastings St. West 



TORONTO 

Robson & Hamilton 

424 Empire Buildings 

64 Wellington St. West 



J. & N. PHILIPS & CO., LIMITED 

MANCHESTER 



dky i;oons REVIEW 




MILLINERY AND HABERDASHERY WIRE, 
Chenilles, Hat Braids, Dress and Mantle, 
Cords and Girdles, Artificial Silk, Braids and 
Ribbons, Russia Braids, Embroidery Silks, Tassels, 
Pom, etc. Upholstery Cords and Trimmings, 
Scroll, Argyle, Saddle Bag and Flat Gimps, DRESS 
FRINGES, Tassels, etc. 

MADE IN SILK, COTTON, WOOL, ETC. 



ARTIFICIAL SILK STRAW BRAIDS 
for MILLINERY HAT MANUFACTURING 



SUPPLIERS TO WHOLESALERS AND SHIPPING HOUSES 

Shipping and Strictly Wholesale Trade Especially Catered For 





TELEGRAMS: 

DAVENPORT 
MACCLESFIELD 



P. DAVENPORT 



MANCHESTER 

OFFICE: 
39 PICCADILLY 



OFFICE: „^"0«<o. 



BRIDGE ST. MILLS - MACCLESFIELD, ENGLAND 

Canadian Agent: R. C. PARSONS, 213,CLOSE AVENUE, TORONTO 



XENGUStty 
1 ■«.™ «•** 



DIM' GOODS RE V J K W 



4-. 




The Fine Scotch Underwear 
with the Fine Scotch Finish 



•■ ' " 




The dry goods dealer considering the claims of 
Pesco should bear in mind the important fact that 
by reason of its quality, Pesco becomes a habit 
with the public and that this habit can be exploit- 
ed all through the year. 

There is, in other words, a constant sale for Pesco. 
Pesco is not merely for Summer, or for Winter, or 
for day or for night wear. It is for all times and 
all climes. It is the universal brand. Man, 
woman and child, the infant and the aged, the 
healthy and the delicate have, within the wide 
compass of its range, textures and garments suit- 
ed to every need and every condition of life. 

Thus, with Pesco in the fixtures, business is ready, 
steady and profitable. And the Cash Bell tinkles 
with a double meaning. Every Pesco Sale binds 
a client to a Store. 

Now on the ground with samples: 

Messrs. C. <k A. G. Clark. 35, Wellington St. West, Toronto 
Mr. R. C. Poyser, 516, Drummond Building, Montreal 
Messrs. The Hanley & Mackay Co., 62, Albert Street, 



\\ 



innipeg. 



Peter 

Hawick 



Sole Maker: 

Scott & 



Co., Ltd. 

Scotland 



London: Carey House, Carey Lane, E.C. 2. 
Sold direct to the retail. 

Showcards, Window Tickets and Literature 
supplied. Enquiries invited. 

We are exhibiting in the Clothing, Outfitting and 
Woollen Trades Exhibition, 8th to 18th March, 
1921, and in the Drapery, Textile and Women's 
Wear Exhibition, 4th to 18th April, 1921, in the 
Royal Agricultural Hall, London, England. 




The Pesco Range 



Obtainable in Pure Wool and Silk 
and Wool textures — 

For Ladies — Combinations, Vests, 
Spencers, Bodices, Drawers, Knick- 
ers, Nightdresses, Rib Vests, etc., 

For Children — Combinations, Night- 
dresses, Sleeping Suits, Shirts, 
Trousers, Knickers, etc., etc. 
For Infants— Binders, Wraps, Kilt- 
lets, Gowns, etc. 
For Gentlemen — Shirts, Trousers, 
Combinations, etc. , etc. 
Also 
Pesco Hose and Half Hose in Black, 
Colors and Mixtures 
and 
Pesco Sports Coats, Jumpers, Under- 
rests. Sweater Coats, Scarfs and 
Caps in the latest styles and color 
effects. 

Guaranteed Unshrinkable 



14 



h K Y GOO DS 1! E V I E W 





have world-wide reputation for merit. 



Sole Manufacturers: 



RIGG BROTHERS, LTD. 

Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers since 1836 
6 MOSLEY STREET, MANCHESTER, ENG. 

Cables: Rigg Brothers, Manchester 




i) i! v <;<>(> ds k k v 1 u w 



15 




Rigg's Sheets 
and Sheetings 



are made throughout by modern methods of manu- 
facture at our mills at Bleaklow, near Bury, Lan- 
cashire (Eng.), from the best raw cotton the 
world can produce, selected and purified by our- 
selves. Diligent scrutiny in all stages of manu- 
facture maintains that unbeatable quality upon 
which their world-fame rests. 

When buying sheets and sheeting, avoid all imi- 
tations, and insist on having RIGG'S. ALL 
RIGG'S Sheets are vouched for by the makers. 
The mark "RIGG'S MANUFACTURE," appear- 
ing on the selvedge, constitutes a guarantee of the 
highest quality. 




To do a permanent good -class 
trade, show RIGG'S SHEETS 




46 



DRY GOODS K E V 1 E W 





^^^^m^^^ 



The Motherland's 
Finest Fabrics 



/^ P. A. Fabrics, by reason of their high- 
^* grade quality, their exclusive and dis- 
tinctive designs, have attained a position of 
pre-eminence, and every care is taken that 
nothing shall compromise this reputation. 

THE Canadian Representative for The Calico Printers' Asso- 
ciation, Ltd., is Mr. Edward Foster. He carries samples of 
all the C.P.A. Fabrics and will be pleased to exhibit these to, 
and receive enquiries from, traders interested in high-class voiles, 
prints, sateens, drills, printed handkerchiefs and furnishing 
fabrics, and the well-known specialties: Grafton Voile, Potters' 
Prints, Cepea Serge, Sheenore, Gemarkord, Cylkcel, etc. 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW TO ENSURE 
PROMPT DELIVERY 

Samples will be submitted on request 
Address your communications to : — 

MR. EDWARD FOSTER, 

426, Coristine Bldgs., 

20, St. Nicholas Street, 

MONTREAL, 

and 

710, Empire Buildings, 

64, Wellington Street, West, 

TORONTO. 



The Calico Printers Association 

Limited 



Manchester 



England 



1)1! Y Odd DS RE V I E W 










RADESECTION 




. (Copyright\ / _ # _ # _^._, 



Discriminating merchants 
and retailers secure their 
best interests by stocking 
goods bearing the B.D.A. 
Monogram. 



GREAT INDUSTRIAL 

LINK 

HP HE "raison d'etre" of the Bradford Dyers' Association, 
-1 Ltd., is to co-ordinate the Manufacturers' Craft with the 
Dyers' Art to produce goods calculated to maintain a world- 
wide supremacy. 

/^ OODS dyed and finished by the Bradford Dyers' 
^-* Association, Ltd., bear the Association's trade mono- 
gram, recognized throughout the Textile World as the Hall- 
mark of Excellence. 

r I^HIS distinguishing symbol is something more than the 
•*- average hall-mark. It is concrete evidence of the best 
Dye and Finish, and of a merchandising policy which 
attracts a definite clientele. All goods so stamped are identi- 
fied with their sources of origin and invested with a commer- 
cial individuality which may be summed up in two words — 

QUALITY AND RELIABILITY 

PATTERNS showing FINISHES and 
full particulars can be obtained on 
application to — 



^ 



THE 



7x 



Bradford Dyers' Association; B? 

LONDON 



MANCI1F.STF.R 



BRADFORD 



6 OXFORD S T 
S T PETERS SO. 



(Dept. 6) 39 WELL ST 




128 V 129 
CHEAPSIDE.E C2. 



•48 



l>UY HOODS REVIEW 




BUYERS SHOULD VISIT 

TH E TWO 

GREAT BRITISH 

TEXTI LE 
EXHIBITIONS 

TO BE HELD IN THE 
SPRING OF 1921 IN 

LOMDOM 



EMC. 




♦ ROYAL * 
AGRICULTURAL 
HALL.L0ND0N 

CLOTHING ^WOOLLEN TfcADIS 

MAR. 8th-18th 

DRAPERY b TEXTILE TRADES 

APR.4H5B, 



ORGANISERS > 

INTERNATIONAL TRADE EXHIBITIONS^ 
BROAD STREET HOUSE, MEW BROAD STREET lomdon«* 

cables; PROMENADE. AVE. LONDON 

ESTABLISHED 189^ 



> ! \ r \ i i>n 



i\ i\ \ i r> \v 



iy 




Drapery, Textile and Wo tiki's Wear 

Exhibition 

APRIL 192 

Royal Agricultural Hall, London, England 

We invite you to see our Exhibit 
at Stands 57 and 64, ground floor. 




50 



DRY HOODS REVIEW 




Obtainable From The 
Leading Wholesale Houses 




Wm. Anderson & Co., Ltd. 

Pacific Mills and 12 Princes Square 
Toronto GLASGOW New York 



43 Scott St. 

*. S. BROWN - Representative 



48 White St. 





32 • 332 6 -332 c -334 

GOSWeLL R5 * LONDON >E CI 

Ladies' 

Leather 

Blouse 

Cases. 



Ladies' 

and 
Gents' 

Suit 
Cases. 




CATALOG D.G.R. 10 ON REQUEST 



THE MOST PROGRESSIVE HOUSE SKf 



Cowhide 

Kit Bags 
Suit Cases 
Brief Bags 
Dress Cases 
Masonic 
Attache Cases 
Music Cases 
Writing Cases 




Overland 
or Cabin 
Trunks 

Ladies' 
Hat Cases 

ALL GOODS ARE 
THE PRODUCT 
OF OUR OWN 
FACTO R I E S 




Best British Material and Workmanship 

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO VISIT 

STAND F. 103 
BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR 

WHITE CITY, SHEPHERDS BUSH, LONDON, ENGLAND 

FEB. 21 -MAR. 4, 1921 




I ' IV A \I\'W| 



11 L. \ J. 1U M 





FOKg 






^^j^Y^ ^^ 



REGISTERED TRADE MARK Canadian No 116. Folio 27150. 



Important to Buyers of 

HIGH CLASS COTTON FABRICS 



p: 



ease 



Note 



THE 

"FERSTRONG" BRAND 

is a guarantee of the Highest Quality, also of an 
absolute uniformity of quality in all repeat business, as 
all the FERSTRONG Materials are made out of 
the Finest and Purest Cotton the World can Produce 

White and Dyed Cambrics 

Also the 

CREPE -DE -FERSTRONG 

the BEST Substitute for Crepe-de-CHine 

These materials are unrivalled for making up Ladies' and 
Childien's underwear, also BLOUSF.S, JUMPERS, CAMISOLES 

and all kinds of Ladies' and Children's Dainty Garments. 

Also High- Class Range of Longcloths. 

Write in FERSTRONG Dept. for ihe names of our Wholesa'e 
Agents ; also Free Patterns and full information on writing to 

"FERSTRONG DEPARTMENT" 

52 FAUjLKNER STREET, MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 








Li Lx I UUUl'C xv -Ui v x iii vv 



.« 



w^sss ' 



SECTION 



WE SPECIALIZE 
in CLOTH for 
LADIES' WEAR 



s& 



SAND SERGES 
TWEEDS 
BLANKET CLOTHS 
WORSTED COATINGS 



33 



JOSEPH FOSTER & Co. 



CALDER MILLS 

ELLAND, YORKSHIRE 

ENGLAND 



Established 185? 



London Warehouse : 
1 LANGHAM PLACE 
REGENT STREET W. 



Mlfflil|ll!ll!llllllllllll!lllllllllllll!IIIP 



n it Y coo ns it BV i E w 



MOTHER LAND TRADE SECTION 



W K Perrott & Sons 



W K PERROTT 



C J. PERROTT 



E S PCRROTT 



Silks . Ribbons. Velvets 



'cl£»mon[s - CENTRAL 1752 1753 1754 
TELEGRAMS - SARSENET. CENT.LONDON 
Cablegrams- SARSENET . LONDON 
CODES USED - MARCONI INTERNATIONAL. 

ABC 5^ EoBCNTLEYSi PRIVATE. 

Bra nc hes 

LONDON. 288/292 Regent Street. w.i 

LUTON. . C. Silver Street. 

MANCHESTER .35. Brown Street 



58,59 &23,ALDERMANBURY 

London. e c 2 

January, 1921. 



We take this opportunity of 
advising our Canadian friends that, 
during the Spring of 1921, we shall 
be able to offer a good selection 
of all classes of PIECE SILKS in 
plain and printed. 

Your enquiries will be esteemed 
a favour and same will have prompt 
attention. 



Canadian Representative : Mr. Wm. Dodd, Prince George Hotel, Toronto, Ont. 



1 ) K \ (iUUUS lifiVI Vj \v 



MOTEER MND TRA 



ION 



.WILD&CO.,^ 

%""%, • ^"^ Manufacturers -^J 

*• Dyed Flannelettes • 



Wholesale and Export Only 




Quality, Finish and Reliability Unsurpassed 



Dominion Agents : 

CANADA:. Geo. H. Napier, 417, Coristine Bldgs., Montreal. 
AUSTRALIA: C. E. Wain, Commerce House, Flinders Lane, Melbourne. 
NEW ZEALAND: F. C. Brookbanks, 23, Strand Arcade, Auckland. 

SOUTH AFRICA: E. O. Robotham, Strathearn House, Rissick and Fox Streets, Johannes- 
burg. 



68, MAJOR ST., MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 



Code : 
ABC (5th edition) 



Cables : 
"VAALETTE, MANCHESTER' 



I'll 1 I i ', M t I > 



K I. \ I h \\ 





'•^OFAGTU^ 

Merchants. 

OXFORDS ZEPHYRS NURSE CLOTHS 
CASEMENTS POPLINS PRINTED GOODS 
FLANNELETTES WHITE DYED & WOVEN. 




Why does 

Flannelette still 
sell so well 

Because for a hundred things there's 
nothing to touch it. 

Flannel's too dear, and, besides that, 
it cannot stand the racket like its 
cheaper cotton compeer. 

The keen woman buyer, seeking 
value, views "union" cloths with 
suspicion; her shrewd judgment 
suspects the proportion the wool 
bears to the cotton in the fusion of 
the two staples. Refusing to buy in 
the dark, she goes for the true and 
trusty "Flannelette." 

We specialise in Flannelettes 

Makers-up and Shippers can see 
patterns of goods put into work 
many months ago. Deliveries are 
now coming up. 



Roberts, Hadfield & Co. 

39&41 George Street, Manchester 

Telephone: 6621-22 Central. Wires: "Rohadco, Manchester." 



l-^r^h Wholesale, Shipping- and 
\ ^-^ Makinguponly. 



VI 



TRADE l&JKf MARK 



D. DAVIS 



TRADE fUlSl MARK 



20 REDCROSS ST. and I BRADFORD AVE. 
LONDON, E.C. I , ENG. 

ESTABLISHED 1895 

MANUFACTURER OF ORIGINAL AND EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

HIGH-CLASS LEATHER GOODS, LADIES' HAND BAGS 
JEWEL CASES, POCKET BOOKS, WALLETS, PORTFOLIOS 

FITTED ATTACHE CASES 




WE SHALL BE PLEASED TO WELCOME ALL 
PRESENT AND PROSPECTIVE CANADIAN CUSTOMERS 

AT OUR EXHIBIT 

STAND F. 42 

BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR, WHITE CITY, LONDON, ENG. 

FEBRUARY 21-MARCH 4, 1921 



58 



DRY coons R IS VIEW 






£*! 




;t 






""FB 



ftl 









IB 



SL 











We Have 20 Large Departments }in Which Are [Stocked All 
the Necessary Articles for Supplying Your Requirements in 

Ladies' and Children's Wear and Soft Furnishinj 



Calicoes, Flannels, Blankets 
Linens and Towels 
Scotch and Soft Furnishing 
Curtains and Curtain Nets 
Dress Goods 
Printed Cotton- 
Flannelettes (Dyed and Printed) 
Mantles and Costumes 



DEPARTMENTS— 

Dress Skirts 

Laces and Embroideries 

Handkerchiefs and Neckwear 

Ribbons 

Silks and Velvets 

Flowers and Feathers 

Trimmed Millinery 

Straws and Semi-Trimmed 



Gloves 

Hosiery and Woven Underwear 

Furs and Umbrellas 

Haberdashery 

Buttons and Trimmings 

Blouses 

Sports Coats 

Ladies' and Children's Outfitting 



A VISIT TO THE ABOVE IS ALWAYS APPRECIATED. 

WE SHALL BE EXHIBITING AT THE DRAPERY 
EXHIBITION. Stand No. 215, Gallery. 



Cable 
Addr< .--■ 
PAW SON. 
LONDON 




PAWS0NS& LEAFS. L™ 

9, St. Pauls Churchyard, LONDON, E.C.4 



Telegram*: "PAWION, CINT, LONDON 



'Phon«. «ze CITY (ft lines) 



A.B.C. 
4th and 5th 

Edition 
and W.U.T. 
Codes used 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



59 




^!iiiir<iriHiiiiiirMiiiiiiitiii rfj.ttiiiidiMi[iiiiitiiibiitiHLMti(iii)iiiiiiiitiir>iiJMiiriirir l itFiitihiii hiriiirii>irtiitii)iitiiiiiiiiMiiiiMi<i<iitiitiiiiiPitiirititiitiiii(iiiiiiMiiiiMtiitiiir;ttiLitiiiiiiiiiiiitriijiMiihi!riii!iiiiJiitiiiiMiMirrirrriiifiifiitiiriiriiiTir<TrrJri 



ROWLAND RAWLINSON, Limited 

Brook Street, London Road, MANCHESTER 



TELEGRAMS: 
'Aspiring " — Manchester 



MILLS: 
Waterjoot, Lancashire 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

All Classes of Felts for the Carpet and 
Furnishing Trade, Shoe Felts, Garter 
Felts, Saddlery Felts, etc.; Woollen 
Baizes, also Raised Cloths for Millinery 

Purposes. 

ENQUIRIES SOLICITED 



=,iiiiuiii i i mi iiiniiimi minim iiuiuuiilliuuiiiiiuiuiMii iiiiuuuiiiu iiuuiuiuuiu iiiiiiiiini I iimiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiui iuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii illinium, Min 



KIDMAR HOSIERY CO. 

53 McPHAIL ST., BRIDGETON, GLASGOW 



Makers of 



Ladies' Sports Coats 

Made from best Scotch Fingering Yarns 
in all Shades. Guaranteed All Wool. 

Children's Jerseys 

Made of Wool with cotton back. In all 
sizes and shades. Styles with button 
shoulders and also polo collars. 

All-Wool Shawls 

For Infant Wear. Made from finest Cross- 
bred and Merino wools. In large range of 
designs and any sizes required. Also in 
Black and Colours. 



Agents : 

WRIGHT & MORGAN 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 



J. C. McGregor & Co. 

53 McPhail St. Bridgeton, Glasgow 



Makers of 



Furnishing Muslins 

Madras Muslins in cream, white and col- 
oured, in all-over and border designs, 
Harness, Spots, Sprigs, Lappets, Brise-bise 
and Waterfall Curtains 

Dress and Millinery 
Muslins 

Book Muslins, Robe Muslins, Lawns, Nain- 
sooks, Madapollams, etc. 

Agents 

WRIGHT & MORGAN 

MONTRFAL and TORONTO 






DRY GOODS REVIEW 




THE ART TOY MANUFACTURING CO. LTD. 



" M i -~ k ; i " toys 
are the ideal 

Your stock is in- 
complete with- 
out '• Misska " 
toys. 

They are wash- 
able and will 
tioat. "Misska'' 
toys are made 
i n plush o f 
various artistic 
colourings and 
are beautifully 
soft and pliable. 

"Misska" to y s 
are B r i t i s b 
made and of 
B r i ti s h ma- 
terials. 




Of World-wide Fame 



71B GOWAN AV. 
FULHAM PALACE ROAD, LONDON 



" Misska " toys 
are sold by all 
first - class toy 
dealers through- 
out the world. 

"Misska" de- 
signs and trade 
mark are regis- 
tered through- 
out the world. 

••The prettiest 
dolls made in 
E n g 1 and." — 
Daily Sketch, 
15/9/19. 




Add 
toys 

stock. 



"Misska" 
to your 



You are cordially invited to visit us and inspect our 



EXHIBIT OF "MISSKA" TOYS AT OUR STAND 
BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR 

WHITE CITY, LONDON, ENG., FEB. 21-MARCH 4, 1921 



TELEGRAMS: 
WAKEFUL 
GLASGOW 



CODE: 
A.B.C. 

5TH EDITION 



WILSON & CO. 

48 ALBION STREET 

GLASGOW 



MANUFACTURERS 

Ecru and Colored Madras Muslins, 

Coin Spots and Figured Harness 

Book Muslins Robe Muslins 

Voiles 

Anglo-Swiss and Broche Muslins, 

"Wilsco" Lawns, "Zelette" 

LACE CURTAINS 

LACE NETS 



TEXTILE SMALLWARES 

JAMES CARR & SONS, LIMITED 
CLARENCE MILLS 

CLARENCE STREET. CHESTER ROAD 

MANCHESTER 

Manufacturers of all classes of Webs, 
Cords and Bindings, in cotton, wor- 
sted and linen; Curtain Webs, Edg- 
ings, Layon Borders, Blind Cords, 
Carpet Binding, Cotton Banding, etc. 

Original Patentees of 
CARR'S WOVEN LADDER TAPE. 

WHOLESALE ONLY. 

Agent for Canada: 

Mr. D. F. Moore 

Manchester Building, Melinda Street 
TORONTO 



DRY GOO I) S K E V I E W 



rif 



61 




LION CREST FABRICS 




CASEMENTS 

We keep up our large variety in 27", 30 , 36 and 50' 
Casements. Best value on the market. 



CRETONNES 

Extensive ranges in 30" Domestics and Sateens. 

Specialty in 50 Reversible and 50 Taffeta Duplex. 
High-class and latest styles. 

Through Wholesale and Shipping Only. 



Canadian Representative : 

GEO. H. NAPIER 

417 Coristine Building - Montreal 




TELEPHONE 
No. 488. 



LONDON OFFICE: 
32, NEWGATE STREET. E.C. 



TELEGRAMS:— 
GRAPHIC. COVENTRY. 



\ 



* Q 



^ 



STEVENS 



<cov# 



4fy 



*) 



tty 



STEVENCRAPH WORKS, 

COVENTRY, ENG. 

AGENTS FOR CANADA: - 

STRACHANS LTD., empire building, 64, Wellington st., west, TORONTO 

MANUFACTURERS 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 



OF 



WOVEN LABELS 



FOR 



WATERPROOFS, HOSIERY, UNDERWEAR, 
SHIRTS AND CLOTHING. 

ALSO NAMED RIBBONS FOR HATS AND CAPS. 



CONTRACTORS TO 

THE ADMIRALTY, WAR OFFICE, COLONIAL AND FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS. 



I ) K Y GOODS R E V I E W 




ION 



INFOOT BRAND 



Unequalled Quality 






WS 579 



.'. 



SK 858 



WS 518 



and numerous other dainty designs in Silk, Kid and other leathers. 
WOOLLY-WKAR — Bonnets, Matinee Jackets, Pullovers, Bootees, Infantees, 
Jumper Suits, etc. Made from high-grade wools and best quality trim- 
mings. Gaiters in Felt and Plush, 

Special attention to import orders. Samples submitted. 

INFANTS* FOOTWEAR LIMITED, London, E.C.1, England 
GREENE-SWIFT BUILDING, LONDON, CANADA 



=31111111 | MMIMIMIMMMIMIMMIMMII IMMIIIIMIIII Mill Illlllllllllllll Mil MIIIIMMIMMJ 

I ABERDEEN GLOVE j 
COMPANY, LTD. 

70 CHAPEL STREET, ABERDEEN 

A.B.C CODE. 5th EDITION | 



MAKERS 

of the 

I AMI I) ABERDEEN GLOVE 

specialties: 

MEN'S, LADIES' 
and CHILDREN'S 
KNITTED WOOLLEN 
GLOVES, GAUNTLETS, etc. 



A genii : 

JAMES CROIL & SONS ARCHIBALD WRIGHT & CO. 
ST. NICHOLAS BLDGS. 32 SILVESTER WILLSON BLDG. 

MONTREAL WINNIPEG 

!IIIIMIMIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMII MM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IMIHIIINIIS 



Are you Visualising Summer Trade ? 

Spring time suggests big demand for dainty white- 
wear. To all good dealers that demand in turn sug- 
gests pleased customers and brisk trade in 

Longcloths, Nainsooks, Cambrics, Madapolams, 
"Diaphalene," etc. 

The name "Horrockses" on cottons has been the 
mark of quality the world over for a century and a 
quarter. 

Place your order early. Should prices drop between 
the date your order is received in Manchester and 
the date your goods are shipped we give you the 
benefit of the lower prices. 

JOHN E. RITCHIE, Canadian Agent 
591 St. Catherine St. W. - MONTREAL 

Branches : Toronto and Vancouver 

UNITED STATES ACENTS: 

WRIGHT & GRAHAM COMPANY 

110 Franklin St., New York City 

HORROCKSES, CREWDSON & CO., LIMITED 

Cotton Spinner* and Manufacturer* 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 



DRY (iOODS REVIEW 



63 




ROBERT W. STIBY, Limited 

Leather Goods Manufacturers 



41, 43, 45 OLD STREET 
LONDON, ENGLAND 



Hand Bags, 
Pocket Books, 
Note Cases, 
Music Rolls, 
Purses, 
Coin Cases, 
Jewel Boxes, 
Portfolios, 
Dressing 

Rolls, 
Writing 

Cases, 
Brush Cases, 
Collar Boxes, -^m 
Brief Bags. 




Attache 

Cases, 

Dressing 

Cases, 

Blouse Cases, 

Hat Cases, 

Suit Cases, 
Fitted and 
Plain, 

Travelling 

Bags, 

Document 

Cases, 

,Kitbags, 

Gladstones. 



ESTABLISHED 1863, THIS BUSINESS HAS ADVANCED 
EVERY YEAR SINCE, IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 

To Canadian Buyers 

You are invited to inspect 
our exhibit at 

STAND No. F. 34 and F. 35 

BRITISH INDUSTRIES 
FAIR 

WHITE CITY,LONDON,ENG. 
Feb. 21st -Mar. 4th,^1921 

Put this address in your 'note 
book NOW, please. 





An inspection of our ex- 
hibit will be both interest- 
ing and profitable. Cana- 
dian business will be 
given the best efforts of our 
factory. 




Novelty of design, excel- 
lence of workmanship and 
quality of material are the 
outstanding features of all 
Sttby's Leather Goods now 
as always. 



« 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




FAUDELS, LIMITEjD 

NEWGATE STREET, E.G. 1, LONDON, ENGLAND. 
EXPORTERS OF 

Hosiery, Haberdashery, 
Laces, Embroideries, Veilings, Ribbons, Cords and Fancy 

Goods of Every Description. 

SPECIALIZING IN 

.. Peacock and^Squirrel Brands of Knitting Wools, 
also Pure andjArtificial Knitting and Sewing Silks. 

FOR CANADIAN TRADE 

STAND No. E. 81 
White City, Shepherds Bush 
BRITISHJINDUSTRIES FAIR, Feb. 21Mar. 4,1921 

CABLES: FAUDEL, LONDON. 






Regisi-ered No 262 005 




The Hall-Mark of 

Maximum Comfort and 
Durability at Minimum Cost. 

FIRST IN THE FIELD AND 8TILL LEADING. 

Manufactured on THE GRADUATED 
PRINCIPLE, and Commencing with TWO 
THREADS in the TOP. it increases in 
WEAR-RESISTING PROPERTIES as it 
descends. 

ThusTHE LEG HAS THREE THREADS, 
THE INSTEP AND FOOT FOUR, 
and the HEEL and TOE FIVE, 
making it essentially 



A HALF HOSE 
FOR HARD WEAR. 



To be had from any of the Leading Wholesale Dry Coods Houses. 



'ITMTr M riirr nMM TITTIIT M TriTT MM TT MMm i M TT H T M *- 



Robert Morton & Sons 

Muslin Manufacturers 

34 Albion St., Glasgow 
— SPECIALTIES — 

Buckrams - Sparteries - Marlys 

MILLINERY MUSLINS in BLACK, 
WHITE and COLORS 

Also 

PALE BOOKS, NAINSOOKS, 
LAWN S, INDIA LINONS, 
PERSIAN LAWN S, CHECK 
CRINOLINES, MADRAS and 
HARNESS MUSLINS, Etc., Etc. 



Cables: Morton, Glasgow 



Code: Marcon 



Canadian Representative 

STRACHANS, LTD. 

Empire Building, 64 Wellington St. West 

TORONTO 



)RY GOODS RE VIE W 



60 




A. STEDALL, LTD. 



ESTABLISHED OVER 50 YEARS 



Wholesale and 

Export 

Man ufact u rers 

of 

Costumes, 
Coats, 
Gowns, 

and 

Fur Coats. 



Five Factories for 

Our Own Exclusive 

Productions. 





Leading 

House 

for Most 

Fashionable 
Garments. 



Exclusive and 
Original Models 

of their 
Own manufacture. 

Catalogues on 
application. 



2 CANNON ST., LONDON, ENGLAND 

CANADIAN BUYERS visiting London are 

invited to call and inspect the 

immense range of 

Spring Models 

now on show in all Departments the Latest 
Fashions at Finest Prices. 

Orders executed direct for Cash against 

Bill of Lading, or through the usual 

buying channels, on receipt of satisfactory 

references. 







2 Cannon St., London, England 






n I! Y GOODS REVIEW 




B 



M 



G 



L 



ASTIN, 1V1ERRYFIELD & BRACKNELL, LTD 

129 ALDERSGATE ST., E.C.I, LONDON, ENGLAND 
" The Premier Bag House of Great Britain" 



Manufacturers of 

LADIES' HANDBAGS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

WE MAKE ALL WE SELL. 
LARGEST RANGE IN GREAT BRITAIN. 



BAGS 



in 

Silk 

Brocade 

Bead 

Leather 

and 

All 

Fancy 

Materials 




FRAMES 



in 

Ivory 

Tortoise Shell 

Celluloid 

Galalith 

and 

Metals 

of Every 

Finish 



"// Pays to Buy From the Maker 



>> 



YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO VISIT US AT THE ABOVE ADDRESS OR AT 

STAND NO. F35 

BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR, SHEPHERDS BUSH, 
LONDON, ENGLAND— FEB. 21 -MARCH 4, 1921 



I) it Y GOODS REV] E W 



• : 





Telephone No?. 
1923, 1924. 
1925. Central 



Codes — 
A.B.C. (4th 
Edition) 
A.B.C. (5th 

Edition) 
A.B.C. (6th 

Edition) 
Western Union 
Ross-Moss 
Lieber's 



C. H. BRITTON 

& SONS 

Lloyd's House - Manchester 

Producers of 

WHITE CALICOES 

Our C. H. B. io quality unsur- 
passed for domestic use, C. H. B. 
ranges the largest in the world. 

Madapolams in all makes, Nain- 
sooks, Cambrics, and our spe- 
cialty — 

"AURANA" CAMBRICS 

White Mediums, Twills, Drills, 
Sheetings, White Dowlas. 

All classes of Grey Cloth, White 
and Dyed Mercerized Voiles, 
Pongees, Fine Warp Satins, Pop- 
lins, White and Dyed Brocades. 

"CYCLO" CLOTHS 

All shades for garments, the best 
and most useful on the market. 

Printed Crimps, our own special 
designs on our renowned K43 
quality. Printed and Mock Voiles, 
Printed Shirtings. 



Canadian Sales Office : 



HAROLD F. WATSON, FOSTER LIMITED 



208 Coristine Building 
MONTREAL 



Codes:-A.B.C. 5^ Marconi Bentleys 

raw 




f^s 



® 



V 



'% 






7 vsm 



taceWindow 
Decorations by 
DOBSONSand 
MBROWNE&eC 

(The Amalgamated firms) 

Wholesalers an J 
Importers onh: 

. ■ Factories;-- 

Meadows MilLNoitinguam 

* -l 1. fir-n 



■ Beeston ■ 
VictoriaMillsJ)raycott, 
Burn Road Mills, 
• Darvel,l{B " 
"Head Offices:- 
Station Street 
Nordrrfhamjintf. 





Doisoos established 1855 
Broumes established 1870 



Cables :-Brun,Nottingham.Eng 



l l m ■*' 



Direct Representative : 

Mr. A. J. Burrows 



- 



nilY GOODS REV] E W 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 



6U 




*S3A*o 




WHOLESALE 
WOOLLEN 
MERCHANTS 

The wearer ot a garment made 
from "Scobro" material has the 
satisfaction of knowing that so 
far as the material is concerned, 
she can hold her own on any oc- 
casion and under any circum- 
stances — because "Scobro" 
stands for "The Best" 




IVe cater entirely for the Ladies" Trade in PIECE GOODS, 
and our large and varied Range comprises 

COSTUME CLOTHS, in Tweeds, DONEGAL 
AND HARRIS EFFECTS, DYED CHEVIOTS, 

AND FRIEZES. 

DYED; BLANKET CLOTHS, VELOURS IN 
COLOURS AND FANCY CHECKS, JACKET 
CLOTHS, MANTLE CLOTHS. 

LADIES' SCARVES TRAVELLING RUGS 

ALL ORDERS AND ENQUIRIES RECEIVE OUR 
MOST CAREFUL AND IMMEDIATE ATTENTION. 



Scott Bros. & Co. 

(Proprietor - Wm. Scott) 

WILTON MILLS, 
HAWICK, 

SCOTLAND 



CABLES: Scobro Hawick. 

CODES: Marconi 

ABC, 6th Edition 

LONDON WAREHOUSE: 
14 WATLINGST.,E.C. 4. 



From the Home of the PURE SCOTCH TWEEDS 




WE SPECIALIZE IN 



Highest Class Pure Scotch Tweeds, Worsteds, Etc. 



FOR 



LADIES' and GENTS' WEAR 

A Hearty Invitation is Extended to All CANADIAN Buyers to Visit Our Mill. 

PETER ANDERSON, - Manufacturer 



BRIDGE MILL 



GALASHIELS 



SCOTLAND. 



KING'S CELEBRATED 
SCOTCH WINDOW HOLLANDS 



have been made for one 
are recognized throughout 
most saleable shading. They 
are unshrinkable, fast colors 
and widths. To insure get 
ers are advised to Examine 
Also inside Holland Tab on 
that each bears name of 




hundred and forty years and 
the world as the best and 
are unequalled for quality, 
and made in all colorings 
ting genuine goods, custom- 
Tickets and Paper Bands. 
end of each piece and see 
"John King & Son." 



SOLD BY ALL LEADING WINDOW SHADE JOBBERS 

Made by 

JOHN KING & SON 

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 

Established 1775 
Canadian Representatives : CAMPBELL, SMIBERT & CO., MONTREAL and TORONTO 




N 



The Manchester Exchange in 1 8 1 6, from an old print 



Progress and Tradition 



The years between the 
foundation of the House 
of Haslam and the present 
decade have witnessed the 
building of three cotton 

exchanges, each bigger than the 
last ; and the new, the largest 
meeting place of merchants in 
the world. 

Accompanying these changes 
have come new methods of 
production, transport and dis- 



tribution more momentous in 
their effect and significance than 
the most optimistic habitue of 
the old exchange ever visioned. 
And the name Haslam, which 
meant fine weaving?, a century 
ago, is to-day associated with 
cotton goods more beautiful in 
conception, moredetdy executed 
than ever before. 
The old traditions stand. The 
reputation of the House of 
Haslam for sterling value and 



unvarying high quality has 
linked the years of progress. 
To-day the Haslam Fabrics are 
known throughout the world as 
the master-creations of cotton- 
land. Reflecting the culm inative 
experience of a century they 
combine that sheer goodness 
which courtesy concedes to be 
an attribute of time past with 
modern design ; they meet the 
needs of to-day and presage the 
fashion of to-morrow. 



The Pilaster Creations of Cottonland 



PE R M A COLA 

A p?rmanent coloured shirting 
fabric in a variety of weaves and 
many hundreds ol different de- 
signs. 

PERMAPROOF 

A high-grade dependable 
waterproof cloth, light and hy- 
gienic and perfectly waterproof, 
in soft, supple finish. 



PERMALIGHT 

A Cotton Dress Fabric. Every 
design woven, not printed. Col- 
ours guaranteed absolutely per- 
manent. Width 39/40 inches. 

NAINBETTER 

An underwear fabric, snowy- 
white and of exceptionally fine 
textue Launders beautifully 
Width 40in. 



PERM AWEAR 

A new cloth for children's 
dresses, aprons, pinafores, and 
other utility garments subject to 
hard wear and washing. 

TRUSONAIN 

Adainty fabric in I6delicateself 
shades, famous for high-grade 
lingerie, blouses, elc. Width 
3940 inches. 



PERMALUSTRA 

A delicate silky fabric, ideal for 
blouses, summer skirts and fancy 
linings, etc. All shades guaran- 
teed fast to light and washing. 

PERMACHIEF 

High-grade quality handker- 
chiefs in many styles for ladies, 
gent s ^children. Every variety 
of design in mercerised cotton 



The following Haslam quality staple lines, sola" unbrandeJ, are in universal use: Longcloths, Twills, Madopalams, Sheetings, Gabar- 
dines, Casement Cloths, Nainsooks, Cambrics, Mulls, Muslins. Mercerised Lawns, Georgettes, Brocades, Voiles 
Piques, Dimities, Sateens, Shirtings, Linings, Handkerchiefs, Italians. ^ fl t , _^ 



Through Wholesale and Shipping only. 



91 



HASLAMS Ltd. 

ESTD. 1816 

THE HASLAM MILLS; 

HALLIWELL COTTON WORKS. DERBY ST. 

MILLS, HASLAM ST. MILLS. LARK HILL 

MILLS, R1VERSDALE MILLS, BOLTON. 

OFFICES AND WAREHOUSES: 
LONDON: 6 and 7. Noble Street. E.C.2: GLAS- 
GOW: 54. Millar Street; BELFAST: Textile Build- 
ings, Linenhall Street: BRADFORD: 37, Swaine 




The 

HASLAM 



Fab 



rics 



MANCHESTER 

ENGLAND 

Street; LEEDS; 55, St. Paul's Street: BRISTOL: 
:, Milk Street; NOTTINGHAM: 3, Low Pave- 
ment. 



Overseas Branches and Agencies: — Paris, Amster- 
dam, New York, Toronto, Montreal, Brussels, 
Oporto, Lisbon, Madrid, Barcelona, Turini Stock- 
holm, Christiania, Copenhagen, Cairo, Cape Town. 
Johannesburg, Sydney, Melbourne, Buenos Ayres, 
Monte Video, Les Palmas, Canary Islands. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




SUPER INDIA SHRUNK TAPE 

for 

100% SATISFACTION 

Long wear and freedom from stretching or shrinking 
characterize this most reliable tape manufactured by 




THE STAC. 






SPEEWYELU 



REGD 

'0 VI 



George H. Wheatcroft & Col, 

Wirksworth, Eng. 

For tailors and clothing manufacturers Super India Shrunk is a 
great hoon. Have you tried it? 

It comes in all widths in 250 and 1.000 yard reels. 



Sole Canadian Agents 




WALTER WILLIAMS & CO., LTD. 



508 Read Building, Montreal 
20 Wellington St. W., Toronto - Quebec 



Vancouver 





GOOD TAILORING IS LABOUR LOST 
IF THE CLOTH IS ILL SHRUNK 



«w/ty W ^*»^**»»^N^*^, 



MAKE SURE IT IS SHRUNK :: AND WELL SHRUNK :: AND KNOW BY WHOM 

THERE'S LITTLE SATISFACTION IN SUCH A STAMP AS "SHRUNK," "WELL 
SHRUNK," "LONDON SHRUNK," OR "SHRUNK BY LONDON PROCESS." 
INSIST ON A SHRINKER'S GUARANTEE— ON THE STAMP OF A FIRST 
CLASS FIRM OF LONDON SHRINKERS— BEST OF ALL ON THE STAMP OF 

JENNENS, WELCH Co., Ltd., 

Cloth Workers and Shrinkers, and Proprietors of the Famous "JENNWEL" Waterproof Finish 

LONDON, HUDDERSFIELD and BRADFORD, ENGLAND. 

WHEN ORDERING ENGLISH CLOTHS. SAY "TO BE SHRUNK BY JENNENS. WELCH & CO.. Ltd." 



I 
1 



N»V^N^^%»«<^|^»*^« 



.flAf-* 



«^| / »»«> V W" » 



As One Business Man to Another 

The aim of Dry Goods Review is to give readers the finest type of editorial service — the best market service 

and the most up-to-date methods and ideas as aids to better store keeping. 

We are confident you will want to renew your subscription for 1921 — for, as many men have expressed it in 

renewing, they would not want to continue in business if the market information we give were not available. 

Every dollar saved in renewing subscriptions means just one dollar more that we can devote to bettering 

our editorial and market services. The large majority of merchants realize this and when they do not 

renew promptly — it is due to an oversight. We feel in bringing the plain facts to their attention they, will 

not, in their own interests, permit us to waste money, in persuading them to renew when they intend doing 

so from the first. 

In the present indefinite state of markets and prices you will not wish to be without a single issue — which 

will happen if you do not renew promptly. 

If you will help us in this way, we can serve you better and to serve our readers better is the daily effort 

of every member of our staff. 

Renew promptly in your own interest. 



I) I! Y GOODS I! I'i V I K \V 



16 








rOTU> 



\hnWu?i<l&?vuL4 jancy CvHvn C/ovtU 





FACTORIES: 10 & 11 Warwick Lane, E.C. St. Paul's Churchyard 

And Paternoster Buildings, E.C. LONDON, ENG. 

A. B.C. Code. 5th Edition. Cables, Churchyard, London. 



n R V GOODS REV] E W 




THE W. R. BROCK COMPANY, Limited 

WHOLESALE DRY GOODS 

MONTREAL 



DRY GOO 1)S \i K V ! E W 



75 



MONTREAL RESIDENT DIRECTORS 

R. A. BROCK * G. S. CLEGHORN 

F. H. KEATING, Halifax 



J. P. Lacxoix 

J. Guillemette 
A. L. McLeod 
G. I. Macleod 
H. A. Knickle 
H. Pouliot 
N. Lalonde 
I,. de G. Huot 



TRAVELLERS 

G. Larochelle 
F. B. Watson 
J. D. Craig 
F. H. Keating 
D. Levasseur 
II. Bateson 
A. Beaudrv 
N. Belair 



E. E. Goodenough 
W. M. Cowling 
R. F. Cutten 
H. Pierce 
T. J. Gunn 
A. Gauthier 
A. Rolland 
L. Perreault 



TEN DEPARTMENTS 

Each a Specialty House in Itself 

A — Sheetings, Flannelettes and Staple 
Cottons. 

AX — Linens, Sateens and Printed Dresses. 

B — Dress Goods and Silks. 

C — Hosiery, Gloves and Underwear. 
CX — Men's Furnishings. 

D — Carpets and House Furnishings. 

E^ — Ribbons, Laces, Embroideries and 
Muslins. 

F — Smallwares. 

G — Ladies' Ready-to-Wear. 

H — Woolens and Tailors' Trimmings. 

OUR MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT is at your service when you run 
short on our lines and our traveller is not in your immediate vicinity. 



THE W. R. BROCK COMPANY 

LIMITED 
WHOLESALE DRY GOODS 

MONTREAL 



I) K Y GOODS K E Y 1 E W 




"The Acme of Simplicity" Drapers' Record 

The "Gem" Outfit 

is the IDEAL Outfit 

for quickly and efficiently covering 
buttons of cloth, silk, etc. It is indis- 
pensable to all makers of Clothes — 
Mantle and Costume Manufacturers, 
Dressmakers, etc. It saves money. 

Canadian buyers visiting the British 
Industries Fair, Glasgow, will be wel- 
comed at our stand where the "GEM" 
can be seen in operation. 

AYe are also makers of high-class buttons in Erinoid (Galalith) for 
ladies' and gentlemen's wear. 

Write for full particulars and prices to the sole makers of "GEM" 
outfits — 

SANDS & GRAHAM, LTD. 

m 48, Miller Street, Glasgow 
Works: 234, Icknield Street, Birmingham 





ESTABLISHED 1849 



BRADSTREET'S 

Offices Throughout the Civilized World 
OFFICES IN CANADA: 



Calgary, Alta. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Halifax, N.S. 
London, Ont. 
Sydney, N.S. 



Ottawa, Ont. Montreal, Que. 

St. John N.B. Quebec, Que. 

Vancouver, B.C. Toronto, Ont. 

Victoria, B.C. Winnipae, Man. 

Hamilton, Ont., and St. John's, Nfld. 



Reputation gained by long years of vigorous, 
conscientious and successful work. 

JOHN A. THOMPSON, General Manager, Western Canada 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 



WOOLLENS 



S3 years in 
service is your 
guarantee of 
satis fac tion 



ox 



FO 



again lead in quality and origin- 
ality of designs and handsome col- 
orings. Ask our Representative to 
show you our wide ranges in 33 
oz. HALF BLOOD OVERCOAT- 
INGS, highly napped and in Eng- 
lish Effect — also our Spring 1921 
SUITINGS for both Men's and Wo- 
men's Wear — smart and distinc- 
tive. 



Oxford, N.S. 



Manufacturing Co., 
Ltd. 



When Mistakes Occur 



In the handling of thousands of subscriptions there must be a few mistakes. We try to eliminate all chance for 
errors — we have spent thousands of dollars on systems that seem to us as near error-proof as human ingenuity can 
make them. 

But sometimes they do occur. They are not intentional. We are very sorry to bill a man a second time when he has 
already paid, but it sometimes happens, but if you will tell us frankly about it you may rest assured this will be 
rectified immediately. But if for any reason you think we are not right, please drop us a note. Your clerks make 
mistakes, too, and you know how much it pleases you when a customer tells you-frankly of his complaint — you look on 
him as a friend of the store. 

We feel just the same way and will venture this — that you have never in all your experience had a complaint with us, 
and you told us about it that it has not been made good at once. " 

Two weeks ago a storekeeper in a small village explained to us she had been receiving Farmers' Magazine, whereas 
she ordered one of our trade papers. Her subscription was advanced one year from the date the complaint was 
reported to us. This was just a clerical error that was made good at once. 

If you have a complaint or think you have one, please communicate at once with the circulation manager. 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 

E3I>=CZIE3[I 



77 



EU 



i 



S 




^ 




Tf 9 U C R&™ 




) ^mS 



TORONTO 

General Wholesale Dry Goods, Woollens, 

Carpets, etc. - 



MEN'S WORK SHIRTS 

Have you placed your Orders for 
MEN'S WORK SHIRTS for SPRING? 

If you have not done so yet, it will certainly 
pay you to see the range we are offering — large, 
roomy, well-made Shirts and VERY SPE- 
CIAL VALUES at the prices we are now 
able to quote. 

Write for samples or see our Representative. 
Our Values are always just a little better. 



Letter Order Department always at your service. 



TORONTO 



COR. BAY AND WELLINGTON STREETS 




^nnr 



I 



1 



~^\ \ o 5 f E= ^ °ii°HR-^ =^ir 



o o II o ■ 




7* 



1> K Y GOODS REV! E \Y 




Waiting to Captivate Spring 

Vote, the weather and the critics need not cause this dainty Miss one qualm, 
-—for she is garbed in a frock so chic that Dame Fashion herself could not 
find fault. Blac'k velvet is the charming dinner frock and iridescent the beads- 
which garnish distinctive side panel* which conspire to an uneven hem. The 
sash, in Paris phraseology, is- ~l,< dernier cri." 



1) K Y GOO D S R E V J K W 



79 



2irj> #oote Iktiteto 

ESTABLISHED 1887 
Issued the 15th of Each Month 

Published by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED 

143-153 University Avenue - - - 



Toronto, Canada 



Branch Offices: 



MONTREAL— 128 Bleury St. 

WINNIPEG— 1103 Union Trust Building 

VANCOUVER- 314 Carter-Cotton Building. 

LONDON, England— 88 Fleet St. E.C. 

NEW YORK— 1606 St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway 

CHICAGO— 405-6 Transportation Bldg.; 608 Dearborn St. 

BOSTON— 734 Old South Building 

Subscription Rates: 

In Canada, per year $2.00 

Outside Canada, per year • $3.00 

Single Copies, 25 cents. 



Vol. XLIII TORONTO, JANUARY, 1921 



No. 1 



A BETTER OUTLOOK 

DRY GOODS REVIEW takes pleasure in wish- 
ing its readers a Happy and Prosperous New 
Year. The indications are that it will be a much 
brighter year for the dry goods trade than could 
have been hoped for a few months back. The long- 
looked-for reaction came suddenly and not slowly 
as many had expected, but the recovery looks very 
hopeful. 

Christmas brought good business, and many 
merchants reported records. One Toronto firm re- 
ported the biggest day in tbe history of the business, 
and similar optimistic advices of improved con- 
ditions have reached the offices of Dry Goods Review 
since the New Year. While certain branches of the 
trade are finding business still very dull, the retail 
trade on the whole lias been flourishing. To this 
-end it must follow that the merchant's stocks are 
getting low. Rock bottom has been reached in some 
lines, and they are on the upward trend again. 
Others are still down. Indications are that the 
"hold-off" policy is due for a fall. When every- 
body gets into the market again, and business re- 
sumes normality, happiness must follow, for a busy 
man is a happy man, and if he is the right sort pros- 
perity will crown his efforts. So here we go all off 
to a good start, with confidence restored and resolu- 
tions firm, remembering, in the recent words of one 
prominent man, that "'the successful business man 
serves God and works like the devil." 



OPPORTUNITY 

ADVOCATES of the "buy now" policy can claim 
for their very own thai old adage: "He who 
hesitates is lost." Dry Goods Review's forecasts that 
early Spring would see a decided trade revival is 
now such a general belief that it behooves the 
prudent merchant to give careful consideration of 
presenl tendencies. According to the economists 
and on this point they are practically unanimous— 
trade revival will create a stiffening in prices. 

As has been pointed out elsewhere in this issue, 
silks are already on an upward trend. Indications 
are that certain other lines will show an advance in 
price at some time in the near future. Failure to 
take advantage of the attractive reductions already 
made in the hope that further and greater reduc- 
tions may still be offered may lead to a discovery 
that the time of bargains is past. While Dry Goods 
Review cannot feel justified in making predictions 
on market conditions at this stage, and prefers not 
to accept the responsibility of being held in the light 
of a prophet when the wisest are reticent about ex- 
pressing an opinion, at the same time we d«:> feel 
that we are justified in encouraging the merchant to 
buy his requirements without delay. We would dis- 
courage speculative buying by all means, but the 
merchant who wishes his store to receive its accus- 
tomed patronage must merit this patronage. If his 
stocks are not attractive and sufficient in range, 
shoppers will seek out new sources of supply — they 
will go to the store where they can procure what 
they want. 

The very fact that people are buying more 
carefully means that they want greater value for 
their money, not less. Under present conditions the 
merchant will do well to select, without hesitation, 
stock which has real value in it, and sufficient stock 
to cover a just estimate of his requirements. Con- 
fidence begets confidence. The merchant who orders 
what he needs can give expression to the fact that bis 
stocks can bear inspection in his store. Where pur- 
chasers see that he has what they want they will 
buy. By keeping in close personal touch with the 
markets and by careful study of his trade papers the 
merchant will be in a better position to appreciate 
what his orders should be, and when to place them. 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 

IF TIMES aren't so good, do what you can to make 

them better. 

* * * 

WATCH your window. Don't leave it for the public 
to pass it by unnoticed. 

* * * 

A CHEERFUL smile, plenty of elbow grease and 
a little hard thinking will work wonders. Try it. 



B 



Di"y Goods Review 



A Big Business in a Small Town 

Tom Weaver Started in Kentville, Nova Scotia, in 1910, With a Stock Worth $245 — at the 
End of Ten Years of Hard, Conscientious Plugging He Owns a First-rate Depart- 
mental Store Widely Patronized — A Cast-iron Policy and Honest Effort 
Have Brought Amazing Results — Here They Are. 




A Store Front That Justifies Pride 



Ten years ago Tom Weaver commenced his little business. To-day his store boasts a complete dry goods stock, a splendid 

patronage and an air of up-to-date progressiveness. 



THIS is the story of Tom Weaver 
and his $245 variety store, which 
within ten years has grown into 
an impressive merchandising establish- 
ment in the town of Kentville, Nova 
Scotia. To-day the Weaver store has 
departments carrying china and glass- 
ware, stationery, groceries and confec- 
tionery, but dry goods and kindred lines 
rank first in the volume of business trans- 
acted, and these lines dominate the ap- 
pearance and tone of the entire estab- 
lishment. 

The object in recording the develop- 
ment of the Weaver business is not to 
present Mr. Weaver as a merchandising 
genius, but to show that it is still pos- 
sible to build up a successful retail 
business in a small town from small be- 
ginnings. And surely the Weaver busi- 
ness started in a small enough way, as 
far as material resources were concerned; 
and in a town not large enough to en- 
courage any merchant to hope to rival 
Wanamaker, Field or Eaton. For in 
ITilO Kentville could claim but a bare 
2,000 population. 

Halilax to Kentville 
Let us begin at the bginning. Early 
in 1010 Tom Weaver had a good job in a 
Halifax dry goods store, a salary, a 
plowing family, and a wife bordering 
on invalidism. The family physician, 
without mincing words, intimated to Mr. 
Weaver that he would have to give up 
cither his job or his wife, as the condi- 
tion of Mrs. Weaver's health demanded 
a more salubrious atmosphere than Hali- 
fax provided. Kentville, seventy miles 
up the Dominion Atlantic Railway, 
seemed to fill the bill first rate as a 
health resort, but offered no sure means 
of keeping the proverbial wolf from the 
door. 

There was no good job in Kentville 



for Tom Weaver, yet it was about the 
most important thing in the world to 
Mr. Weaver then that Kentville should 
provide the means of livelihood for him- 
self and family. Like the moose that 
climbed the tree when surrounded by 
ravenous wolves, Mr. Weaver felt that 
he "just had to do something." After 
a careful canvass of the situation, and 
some very serious talks between them- 
selves, in which lack of capital always 
rose up like an appalling spectre, Mr. and 
Mrs. Weaver finally decided that a var- 
iety store offered the only solution to 
their problem. 

Accordingly, on July 2, 1910, Weaver's 
Variety Store opened its doors. Kent- 
ville people probably never have sus- 
pected that on that July day the whole- 
sale value of the merchandise exposed for 
sale in the new store was only $245. 
That was all the money Tom Weaver had 
to spend for goods after paying his first 
month's rent, buying necessary but in- 
expensive fixtures, and opening a bank 
account with $40 to his credit. But 
the word "variety" meant something in 
the store's title, and by careful selection 
of a large number of different articles, 
and adroit display in the small show 
windows as well as within the store that 
little $245 was made to do grand work 
on the store's birthday. The people 
came, they saw, and they bought — en- 
couragingly, though not extravagantly. 
The Store Policy 

From the first it was evident that 
there was a fair chance of making the 
store go, but only by exercising the 
strictest economy and by constantly 
building up public good will. Good bus- 
iness dictated the practice of a definite 
policy in relation to the public, and into 
this policy Mr. Weaver incorporated the 
three sound elements of cash sales, 



small profits, and rigid prices. This 
policy is expressed to-day, as it has been 
expressed throughout the last ten years, 
in every Weaver advertisement in two 
slogans: "One Price to Every Cus- 
tomer" — "Where You Pay Pay Cash 
and Pay Less." The invention of these 
slogans cost Mr. Weaver some anxious 
thinking for a few days before he found 
the right combination of words to ex- 
press his ideas to his satisfaction, but 
he considered a slogan a necessity in his 
advertising, and the concise phrases 
which he evolved proved their value to 
his business by doing what has been 
required of them. Day by day for the 
last ten years they have reiterated in 
terse, catchy and convincing language 
the essence of the story that Mr. 
Weaver has wanted the people of Kent- 
ville and surrounding country to hear. 
Before he had been in business very 
long Mr. Weaver discovered that form- 
ulating a policy and carrying it out were 
not exactly the same thing. Nobody 
objected to his small profits and low 
prices, but when it came to getting cash 
for every sale, and charging everybody 
the same price for the same article, he 
found people who questioned his wisdom 
and resented the application of these 
ideas to themselves. Kentville, like most 
places of its size and kind, is largely a 
credit community, and there are a lot 
of prosperous people there whose ac- 
counts as as good as gold. As the 
Weaver store grew, and gradually came 
to handle lines' appealing to the more 
substantial citizens these people came 
to buy — on credit. 

Cash Policy Wins Out 

"I had decided to do a strictly cash 
business, because at first I had not suf- 
ficient capital to permit me to sell on 



DRY GOODS K E V I E \Y 



3] 



credit; and as time went on, the steady 
progress I was making- convinced me that 
strictly cash was good policy for me 
to stick to," said Mr. Weaver, in dis- 
cussing his business with Dry Goods Re- 
view. "Now, any good business man 
knows," he continued, "how foolish it is 
to try to run with the hare and hunt 
with the hounds by pretending to one 
customer to sell for cash only, while al- 
lowing another customer to buy on cre- 
dit. There is too much human inter- 
course anywhere, and especially in small 
towns, to permit any merchant to get 
away with it. Eventually, the deceit :'s 
discovered, and when the discovery is 
made the merchant loses soma of the 
biggest asset any merchant possesses. 
That is good will. So, when these people 
began to come to me, I had to turn them 
down, or haul down my slogan of "Pay 
Cash and Pay Less.' That 'pay less ', 
I knew, had helped me along a lot, and 
I firmly believed, if I kept it true, it 
always would be a big help. It was 
simply too big a selling point to aban- 
don, and so I sat tight. Some people 
were offended for a time, but for every 
one who took exception to my attitude I 
am sure I have made a dozen friends by 
sticking to my guns, and treating every- 
body alike. Even some of those who 
took offense in the early days have since 
recognised the fairness of my pol : cy, 
and are now good customers. I can see 
now more clearly than ever the mistake 
it would have been for me to have weak- 
ened before the attack of the credit 
seekers, although there were many good 
accounts among them." 

'One Price to All" Had Problems 

Next to the credit problem, perhaps, 
more trying, because unexpected, and 
unjustifiable on the part of purchase":', 
was Mr. Weaver's experience wioh p.-ople 
unwilling to pay the prices marked on 
merchandise. In keeping with his one- 
price-to-all policy, Mr. Weaver started 
out by putting plainly marked price 
tickets or cards on every article in ..is 




One of the finest departments in the Weaver store is that of the china and glassware 
se:tions, where a splendid stock is effectively displayed. 



store. A woman would come in, and 
finding a blouse say, that caught; her 
fancy, would ask in an engagingly in- 
genuous manner: "What is the best you 
can do on that?" The reply was always 
to the effect that the marked price was 
the only one at which the article could 
be bought. "Oh, yes, I know," the cus- 
tomer would return, "that's what they 
all say, at first; but I always get a dis- 
count because I pay cash, and buy a lot 
of goods, and have a big family, and a 
lot of relatives, and know everybody, and 
am considered a good customer. You 
can afford to knock something off your 
price like the other merchants do." 

In the store's early days such custom- 
ers and similar arguments were fre- 
quent. To all who asked for price re- 
ductions Mr. Weaver explained that bis 
business policy positively piohibited 
special price reductions to any 
individual; that his goods were priced 
for cash sales; that his prices were as 
low as he could afford to make them; 
that price cutting in any individual case 
would be unfair to other customers; that 




A section of the Weaver store, showing the attractive arrangement of ribhons, 

novelties and notions. 



he wanted his word to be believed; that 
he considered public confidence his great- 
est possible asset; and that the only 
way he could hope to make people have 
confidence in his one price policy was 
actually to have but one price for any 
article. 

It was tedious and often annoying 
work, that required patience, to be con- 
tinually resisting bargain drivers, but 
one by one they were convinced that 
price haggling was a futile pastime in 
the Weaver store, and gradually the de- 
mand for price concessions subsided, and 
after a while died out altogether. Now, 
the one-price-to-every-customer slogan 
is taken at its face value, and buyers no 
longer waste their own time or that of 
the Weaver sales staff, in trying to buy 
the goods they desire for less than the 
marked prices. Mr. Weaver says that 
the painstaking effort required to make 
it clear that fixed prices are a fact, and 
not merely a claim, has continuously 
brought big returns in public confidence 
and good will, and in sales. 

Excellent Store Displays 

Two other factors in the development 
of Weaver's store call for special atten- 
tion. These are store displays and ad- 
vertising. The accompanying photo- 
graphs show just how attractively and 
effectively goods in this store are dis- 
played. Saleable articles are not hid- 
den away waiting for someone to ask 
for them. Everything is in plain view, 
and as far as it can be done with good 
taste, all available space throughout the 
store is used for the purpose of attract- 
ing attention to the merchandise offered 
for sale. "I want no unprofitable space 
in the store," says Mr. Weaver. "Every 
foot of space in this store costs me 
money, and it is my purpose to have it 
contribute in one way or another to my 
volume of sales. Therefore, I use it all 
as well as I know how to help my sales.' - 

Weaver advertisements are definite 
sales efforts, containing fresh and inter- 
esting merchandising news. Cuts are 



52 



DRY GOODS KKV1KW 



seldom lised because Mr. Weaver says he 
finds it difficult to obtain, at prices he 
feels he can afford to pay, stereotypes or 
electrotypes that properly illustrate his 
advertising. Adequate description of 
articles characterize each advertisement, 
and prices are always prominent in his 
pnnted messages. He uses both local 
papers, and lets the volume and impor- 
tance of what he has to say determine 
the space to be occupied. No Weaver 
advertisement appears twice in the same 
paper. 

Pays to Use Daily Papers 

Diy Goods Review's interview with 
this Nova Scotia merchant discloses a 
viewpoint in regard to the relations of 
the business community and newspapers, 
one towards the other, that deserves 
more than passing consideration by both 
parties. "The newspapers get my money 
for just one purpose, and that is to bring 
business to my store." declares Mr. 
Weaves. "I am not impressed with the 
argument that it is any merchant's duty 
to :-upport the local paper. If I believed 
that to be true I think I would make 
the publisher a direct contribution and let 
let it go at that.^ I prefer to consider the 
local newspaper as a business institu- 
tion, able to render me a distinct ser- 
vice in a business-like way, for which I 
should pay what such service is worth, 
rather than to look upon the publisher 
as an object of charity, and myself as 
a Lord Bountiful. In any case, I do not 
donate any money to the Kentville 
papers. I spend money with them week 
after week regularly, but it pays me to 
do so, and I would not do it otherwise." 

Continuing, Mr. Weaver remarked: 
"While my advertising pays me, I do not 
give the newspapers all the credit for 
that fact, and if my advertising did not 
pay. I do not think I would blame the 
newspapers entirely. What I buy from 
the newspapers is space to be used in 
teliing their subscribers about my store 
and its merchandise. The way I use 
that space is what counts most in get- 
ting results, or in failing to get them. I 
can not expect newspaper readers to 
come in and buy my goods unless they 
believe that what I have to sell is what 
they should buy, and that they will re- 
ceive fair and square treatment in my 
store. The constant object of my ad- 
vertising is to cause them to believe 
those two things, and just to the ex- 
tent to which I put over these two ideas 
I know my advertising will be success- 
ful. All I ask of the newspaper publish- 
er is that he carry my message to a cer- 
tain number of peop'e, and that he pre- 
sent it typographically the way I want 
it presented. That is the extent of his 
responsibility, and the rest of it is 
mine." 

So much for Tom Weaver's methods 
and policies. The proof of the pudding 
is in the eating thereof. This article can 
not properly discuss the question of how 
much business the Weaver store is doing 
to-day. But to follow Hamlet's advice 



and "look first upon this picture, then 
on that," to view the Weaver Variety 
Store in 1910, and then look to-day upon 
"Weavers" (''variety" is deleted, if you 
please) one can reasonably conclude that 
the business has had a remarkable 
growth. So it has. Some time ago Mr. 
Weaver bought the building, a small 



part of which was occupied by his store 
when he began business. The entire 
lower floor is now taken up by the 
present store, which has recently been 
decorated, remodelled, and equipped 
in the most up-to-date fashion. Tom 
Weaver must have had some good ideas 
to begin with. 



Merchants Place Orders 

For Spring Requirements 

When Noticeable Demand for Merchandise Comes Prices Will 
Advance, Says Prominent Member of the Trade — Mer- 
chants in Outside Districts Buying Normally 
for Spring Needs — Improvement Noted. 



"E 



VERYTHING that could possibly 
be expected has conspired to 
dislocate business for Spring, 
1921," declared a prominent member of 
the trade in discussing the outlook as 
regards wholesale orders in the next few- 
weeks. While Dry Goods Review's in- 
formant admitted that business in some 
lines, noticeably silks, had commenced to 
give promise of improvement, he main- 
tained that generally speaking the de- 
mand in almost every line was most dis- 
couragingly lacking, a condition which, 
however, must eventually be righted by 
the needs created by low stocks. 

"Some retailers are only buying from 
hand to mouth," declared this whole- 
saler, "being fearful of contracts for de- 
liveries in advance, while others are 
pdacing orders for their ordinary Spring 
requirements. This latter class is in 
the decided majority and we conscien- 
tiously believe is adopting the wise 
course for the following reasons; — 

Four Points Worth Noting 

"1st. — It is our honest opinion, and the 
one most prevalent, that prices have at 
last reached their lowest level. 
- "2nd. — Speaking generally, mills ac- 
cepting business at present quotations 
will lose money on every order they 
execute. 

"3rd. — Just as soon as any noticeable 
demand for merchandise begins a short- 
age will quickly follow as production has 
been so enormously curtailed. 

"4th. — There must be a resultant scar- 
city with a sharp reactionary upward 
tendency in the market. 

"These facts are indisputable, — the 
only question being just exactly when the 
turn will come. Some place it as early 
as February while others prophesy April. 
In our opinion a happy medium ought to 
be correct so we name March first as 
the most likely date. 

"In the meantime it is the duty of the 
trade to commence buying immediately 
for Spring," was this wholesaler's opin- 
ion. "Not in any speculative measure, 
but to meet ordinary demands." 

This particular wholesaler was inter- 



viewed because Dry Goods Review has 
good reson to respect his opinion. He is 
a man who has been actively in touch 
with the biggest trade centres on this 
side and abroad for years. His past sur- 
veys in times of uncertainty have been 
accurate and his advice sound. He knows 
what he is talking about when he pre- 
dicts a shortage and an upward ten- 
dency. The movement has already been 
seen in the silk market where prices 
were away below what a normal healthy 
market demanded. These are. coming 
up steadily but surely, and although silks 
are to be more reasonable than they 
have been for several years, they will 
in only a few instances get back to any- 
thing like pre-war prices. Other lines 
on which production has been slowed 
down and for; which there will be a big 
demand suddenly when buying com- 
mences will almost certainly firm up to 
prices in advance of present quotations. 
The "buy now" policy is strongly 
sponsored by this veteran member of the 
dry goods trade and is well founded. 

Small Towns Respond. 

It is stated that the travellers whose 
territory takes them to the small coun- 
try towns are finding stocks lower than 
they have been before. 

"All our business at present is coming 
from the small outlying points," declar- 
ed the head of one big wholesale house, 
which has Dominion-wide custom. "This 
fact indicates that where stocks are low 
normal buying is being done. In the 
larger centres where during the war 
orders were duplicated almost without 
exception so that merchants would be 
sure of at least part delivery the situa- 
tion has been different. Orders even- 
tually poured in from all sources and 
merchants found themselves with very- 
heavy stocks which enabled them to man- 
age for months without placing further 
orders. It is estimated that although 
these merchants in the bigger cities are 
still holding off, it is now just a matter 
of weeks before they commence another 
buying campaign. This will present an 
interesting new aspect that should stim- 
ulate interest all along the line. 



Dry (jfoods Review 



83 



A Pay Envelope That Inspires Loyalty 

[anuary is a Good Month to Commence Campaign Through Direct Channel- Send New 

Year's Message Through the Pay Envelope and Begin a Practice That Will Raise 

the Efficiency of Your Store Staff — -Encourage Where Work Merits Comment. 



AN effective medium for increasing 
the sales efficiency of your sales- 
people is the pay envelope. Hard- 
ly does the average merchant realize 
the tremendous part the weekly pay en- 
velope plays in the daily life of his em- 
ployees. It is a welcome guest the end 
of each week. It brings renewed cour- 
age to the worker, it inspires him to 
renewed effort and reminds him of his 
duty to his employer and to his fellow- 
employees — that is, if the pay envelope 
is used in the right way. 

A pay envelope containing nothing but 
the neatly cut paper bearing the indel- 
ible mark of the check protector, or the 
bright green of paper money, is as bar- 
ren, as far as the merchant is concerned, 
as the dry sand of the desert. But, if 
filled with a brief message of encour- 
agement, of due appreciation of extra 
effort and loyalty, the pay envelope can 
become a very efficient morale booster. 

The first of the new year is here. The 
workers must be inspired to renewed ef- 
fort for a great year of sales. The head 
of the concern will write his yearly mes- 
sage to his sales force. Why not use 
the pay envelope as the medium to trans- 
mit the great message? 

Here is the full story as related to the 
writer by the manager of a successful 
Ontario retail concern: 

Punch in New Year's Message 

"I got the idea a little over a year 
ago," said this manager. "Our concern 
had just been organized. We hired an 
efficient force of workers. For days they 
were all pep and energy. We got co-op- 
eration all around. The sales went up 
in a brief time. I looked for a way to 
maintain the efficiency and morale of 
our employees. 

"The new year came around pretty 
quick. I decided to deliver a real New 
Year's message to our employees. But 
I tried to get away from the old, cut- 
and-dried method of New Year's talk. 

"As I was writing my message to my 
employees I noticed a batch of pay en- 
velopes on my desk. The idea came to 
me. I completed my New Year's mes- 
sage, had it typewritten in the form of 
personal letters to our salespeople, and 
inserted one in every pay envelope. 

"Here is what I wrote: 

" 'My dear Mr. : 

" 'The first of the new year is at hand. 
I want to say to you that it is because 
of your good work and your honest ef- 
forts to make our business a success that 
we are able to start a new year with 
great hopes of increasing our sales at 
least a hundred per cent. 



" 'I know that you feel the same about 
it. We have been fair to you in every 
way. While we appreciate your every 
effort for our good, we want to make 
you feel that everything you will do for 
the good of the firm will not be over- 
looked, and in every instance we will 
express our due appreciation to you. 

" 'Hereafter, in each week's pay en- 
velope you will find a slip of paper. The 
slip will contain a statement of your 
weekly sales. There will be a note tell- 
ing you whether your sales for that week 
surpassed your previous record. Re- 
member, that will be our personal mes- 
sage-to you. We will aim to encourage 
you, to make a better salesman out of 
you. 

" 'And don't forget the next new year. 
We will want to say to you then that 
you have fulfilled our wish to increase 
the year's sales at least a hundred per 
cent. 

" 'Wishing you and your family a very 
happy and prosperous new year, we 
remain, 



'Your faithful friends, 



& Co.' 



"This letter proved very effective," 
the manager continued. "It was read 
aloud to the family as soon as the pay 
envelope was brought home. A number 
of our employees wrote back New 
Year's greetings, and in every instance 
they offered their hearty co-operation to 
make our new year a success. 

Record of Sales 

"But that was only the beginning. I 
set to work immediately outlining a sys- 
tem of keeping check on our employees, 
so that at the end of every week a sales 
statement could be handed each, together 
with the pay envelope. 

"I acted on the theory that praise is 
effective only when it is handed out right 
after the accomplishment. For instance, 
if you note that one of your salesmen 
broke the record for sales during a cer- 
tain week the thing for you to do is go 
up to him and give him due credit for 
his efforts as soon as you can, and not 
wait a couple of months to do so. 

"And so, I got up a set of slips. I had 
my secretary go over the individual sales 
records the end of every week. On each 
slip she noted the name of one of our 
salesmen and then followed a record of 
his daily sales and a total of his sales 
during the entire week. 

"After making out the slip the secre- 
tary looks up the salesman's record dur- 
ing the previous week, and notes whether 
his weeklv sales have shown an increase 



or a slump. She then gives me the slips 
for my attention. 

Commenting on Work 

"Before enclosing these statements in 
the weekly envelope I go over them, and 
after studying the figures for a few min- 
utes write a personal note to the sales- 
man. This note is enclosed in the pay 
envelope, along with the weekly state- 
ment of sales. 

"I try to make the note as personal 
and as human as I possibly can. Here 
is a typical note addressed to one of our 
best salesmen: 
" 'My dear Mr. : 



" 'This week the sales record showed 
you a world beater. Of course, it was 
no surprise to me. Every time I get hold 
of a batch of weekly sales slips I could 
single yours out in just a moment. This 
time I had to look at it at least a dozen 
times before putting it into your pay 
envelope. 

" 'Now, old man, when you get home 
tonight have your wife read the pay en- 
velope ten times and then hang it up in 
your best room. There is a ten dollar 
raise in it for you. 

" 'I can just imagine what I'll have to 
say to you when next pay day comes 
around. Thank you.' 

Encouragement 

"And now, take the man who makes 
a poor showing during a certain week. 
He might be a good man, but you know 
how it is in the selling game. The fel- 
low might have been foeling out cf sorts, 
and the weather might have been worse. 
The best thing to do under these condi- 
tions is not to discourage him. That 
would prove fatal. Instead, he finds a 
note like this in his pay envelope: 

"'My dear Mr. : 

' 'Looking at your sales slips mads me 
think of a thermometer on an October 
day. Here it is down, and there it comes 
up again. Although your sales record 
the past week made you look like a de- 
feated candidate for office, I know very 
well that you are coming back strong 
next week, as is your usual custom. I 
know you feel the same way about it. 
We'll see you again next week, old man. 
Meanwhile, best of luck. Thank you in 
advance.' 

"When we want our salespeople to 
read our advertisements we insert proofs 
in the weekly envelope, and they are sure 
to read them. On the whole, we have 
found the pay envelope an effective me- 
dium of reaching the hearts of our sales- 
people. The progressive merchant can 
no doubt find many other ways of utiliz- 
ing the pay envelope." 



-J 



Dry Goods Rccievr 



Optimism Pervades the Trade 

Retail Business Has Been Good Since Christmas — Stocks Are Getting Lower and Mer- 
chants Are Already Buying in Some Lines — Silks Picking Up Rapidly, Cottons 
Still Uneasv and Woolens Very Quiet — General Indications Bright, However. 



A FEELING of optimism pervades the trade. 
Christmas trade with most retailers was very 
good, in some cases exceeding even that of a 
year ago. If the profits were not as long, trading 
- active and goods were being cleared from the 
shelves, making ready for others at cheaper prices. 
And since Christmas the retail trade has been good, 
better than was looked for: there is evidence that 
the people are not only ready to buy, but are actually 
buying. Bank statements show clearly that there 
is plenty of money in the country, and the rapidity, 
for instance, with which the British Columbia bond 
issue was taken up indicates that people are ready 
to spend their money. 

There is a reflection of these conditions in the 
wholesale houses and amongst manufacturers and 
manufacturers' agents. As one man put it to Dry 
Goods Review, there is a very "healthy undertone" 
in the trade. He was a ready-to-wear man and had 
just received good reports from travellers in British 
Columbia; one man had doubled on an order in 
comparison with a year ago. Judging from talk 
in the wholesale houses, stocks on the retailers' 
shelves are getting well down in many lines. Buyers 
who come in to the city may not purchase quantities 
of one line, may not, in fact, purchase anything in 
lines that are still going down in price; but they 
state that their stocks are low but they are waiting 
for more stable prices. On the other hand, there 
has been an active revival of buying in some lines. 
The silk men report very good business at a time 
of the year when they really look for none at all — 
that is, just before retail stock-taking. There is some 
movement in laces and embroideries, and in draper- 
ies and curtains. At this time of writing, travellers 
are just about to take the road, and there is a feeling 
that they will meet with considerable success. 

Silks 

There is a general improvement in the silk situa- 
tion and business is picking up all along the line. 
Recently there has even been an advance in Japanese 
silk« of about ten per cent. Looking back over the 
last nine months, it has been a hard time for the 
silk men and now. it appears, they are about the 
first to feel the pulse of normal times again. Evident- 
- throughout the country on retailers' shelves 
are low, for there has been a good demand for im- 
mediate delivery — an unusual thing at this time of 



the year when -lock-taking is just in the offing. 
The demand for high and medium-priced taffetas 
has been good, and the statement made in last 
month's market reports that there would be a 
scarcity in some lines has already been verified. 
We know of a case where a silk blouse manufacturer 
wanted some hundreds of yards to make up his 
blouses, and was quite unable to get the quantity 
he wanted. American buyers are now in the Japanese 
market and are placing good orders, a fact which 
is regarded by silk men as a good omen. 

The European market is still rather quiet and 
prices, except in cases where necessity is the dominat- 
ing factor, are pretty firm. Manufacturing is dead. 

Draperies and Curtains 

In spite of the fact that wholesale houses look 
for little business in these lines at this time of the 
year, some good orders are coming in, among them 
some from the far and middle West. These orders 
are for immediate delivery, which is na indication 
that stocks are getting well down. The big house 5 
have taken their stock and have marked down their 
prices, having in view replacement value. Some of 
these reductions were recorded a month ago ; since 
then there have been a few minor reductions, and 
wholesalers and manufacturers now say their prices* 
have reached the bottom. 

Linens 

In comparison with a year ago, linen prices are 
about twenty per cent, lower than then. In the 
Canadian market such a drop probably represents 
reductions made in view of wiping out any advan- 
tage that accrued as a result of unfavorable exchange, 
or having in view replacement value, which is lower 
on account of a keen desire for business. There is 
certainly nothing yet in the raw material outlook 
to encourage a belief in much lower, if any lower, 
prices in linens. Seventy-five per cent, of the raw 
material came from Russia. Now none comes from 
there, and the flax from other countries that grow 
it does not even begin to supply the world's need. 
The past year has seen many substitutes on the 
market. This is likely to remain the case for some 
years to come until greater production of the flax 
is in sight. Fluctuations in prices at the present 
time are due to the necessity for business rather 
than costs of raw material and production. 



D R Y GOODS REVIEW 



85 



Laces and Embroideries 

There have been no further reductions in prices 
since those referred to a month ago. Houses feel, 
however, that merchants' stocks throughout the 
country are low, and during the last week or ten 
days some good orders have been coming in. They 
have not been large, hut they have come just the 
same. Moreover, wholesalers' houses state that the 
retail buyers have promised further orders after their 
stock-taking which will be completed within a few 
weeks. The retailer is anxious to have this task 
over with and to write off the loss he must take in 
view of the lower prices before he stocks up again. 
Looking back over the last six months, it might be 
roughly estimated that embroideries, laces and nets 
during the last six months have declined about 20 
per cent., while the silk creations have gone down 
about 50 per cent. Advices from the Old Country 
are to the effect that little manufacturing is going on, 
that labor prices are remaining about the same, and 
that stocks are heavy and deliveries can be made 
very promptly. 

Woollen Dress Goods 

There is little that can be said of the woollen 
dress goods situation at this time of writing. Travel- 
lers are just out on the road and reports are, as yet, 
meagre. In comparison with the prices that were 
offered last Fall, the prices now being offered are 
some easier. The wholesaler has taken stock and 
has taken the loss that is necessary, having in view 
any slight reductions that have been made — which. 
by the way, are very slight — and the wiping out of 
exchange advantage. Wholesalers state that reduc- 
tions in woollens are likely to be very slight because 
the English market, after all, is a world market, 
and is waiting for activity in Germany. Russia, 
Austria, and other European countries. As a result, 
British houses are more or less standing pat on 
prices. 

Cottons 

On account of the slaughtering competition from 
the United States, new lists were issued by Dominion 
Textiles and Wabasso on January 6th. These new 
lists mean reductions in white and grey cottons, 
sheetings (grey and bleached), pillow cottons, can- 
ton flannels, towelling and towels, ducks, etc., of 
from 20 to 25 per cent. It is the obvious intention 
of the mills across the line to unload their heavy 
stock; ; and it is equally the obvious intention of the 
Canadian mills to meet and defeat this competition 
for which, of course, they cannot be blamed. This 
new reduction was quite a surprise to wholesalers 
who felt that the December reduction brought prices 
down to rock bottom, and they now feel that prices 
are below the cost of production. Wholesaler? be- 



lieve that this will be about the last reduction of 
the kind, and their view is supported, at all events, 
by the trend of the raw cotton prices, which, during 
the last two weeks, have advanced 2^2 cents. If 
the advance continues further, reductions are out 
of the question, but the uncertainty of the cotton 
situation is still a disturbing factor in the trade. 

Referring to conditions in the cotton trade, the 
managing director of one of the Canadian mills 
recently said: "Personally, I do not expect that the 
present condition of things will last very much 
longer — I look for a gradual improvement in trade 
from this time forward, and it will be surprising 
if by Spring we are not back again to normal. 

"So far as I can learn, stocks in the hands of 
the retail trade are very much broken, and these 
stocks will have to be replenished in the not distant 
future. Apparently, the sooner we all get down to 
bed-rock the sooner will conditions improve. Profits 
have been practically eliminated in so far as the tex- 
tile industry is concerned, and if these low prices 
now being quoted are met by the wholesale and 
retail trade, as doubtless they will be met in time, 
then we may look for an improvement in general 
business very shortly. 

"In so far as the raw cotton is concerned this is 
now selling much below the cost of production, and, 
of course, a condition of this kind cannot last in- 
definitely." 

The new lists of January 6th will entail losses all 
round. The wholesale houses have just completed 
their stock-taking during which they wrote off many 
thousands of dollars on cottons, having in view the 
replacement value. Now they have to do it all over 
again, and they state that orders that have not been 
filled will be filled at these new prices. Retailers 
will also have to bear some loss on stocks they have 
on hand. It is a case of everyone taking their share 
of the loss. 

Oilcloths and Linoleums 

The second drop within a month is recorded in 
the case of floor oils. On a former list, No. 3, which 
sold at 65 and 66 cents, is now 58 and 59 cents. 
The new reduction which came the first of the month 
makes about a 20 per cent, reduction in one month. 
Wholesalers state that the price is now guaranteed 
until the end of April. 

Carpets and rugs have undergone new changes 
in price during the last month, and the latest advices 
from England indicate that prices are holding firm. 
There is to be a meeting shortly, we understand, of 
the Canadian carpet manufacturers at which, no 
doubt, prices will be discussed and announcements 
made subsequently. 

The cotton reduction has made quite a difference 
in the price of quilts. Quilts that were formerly 
$2.40 are now $1.35, and $3.00 quilts are now $1.65. 



3 



Dry Goods Review 



A Review of the French Market 

Transactions Lag in Wholesale and Retail Circles — Simultaneous Increase of Price in For- 
eign Goods and Decline in Value of the Franc Hurts Trade in France — No Im- 
provement Hoped for During First Months of New Year— Cloth Houses 

and Furriers Hard Hit. 



Paris, Prance, 

December, 1920 

EDITOR Dry Goods Review:— I sup- 
pose it will be interesting for you 
to have some idea of what the 
French market is like at present. 

Here, as everywhere else, business in 
all lines, is at a standstill. No transac- 
tions worth mentioning, whether in the 
wholesale or retail houses, take place, 
and no one seems to know exactly when 
this state of things will improve. 

In order to be able to judge the mat- 
ter, one has to look back to last year's 
conditions. Then, the soldiers were re- 
turning from the army, the French ones 
had to spend the allowance they had been 
granted; they needed many things. The 
allies were spending their money in buy- 
ing souvenirs from France, visiting the 
country, etc. Many foreigners came, 
too. Munition factories had not yet 
closed their doors, and the work people 
who earned good wages enjoyed life 
as much as they could. For all these 
reasons, business was very brisk, the 
country people got any price for their 
products, and luxuries were snatched 
up, no matter what their cost was. 

Travelling on the Crest 

Then, people who had money left, 
took to speculating. The Paris "Bourse" 
was daily crowded with petty trades- 
men eager to make profitable invest- 
ments. Up to last May the situation 
was wonderfully brilliant. However, 
as the foreign currencies began to in- 
crease in value, and the franc went 
down, the French manufacturers found 
it difficult to buy at reasonable prices 
the raw materials needed for their 
trade. Everybody knows how the Japan- 
ese silk, the American cotton, the wool, 
furs, etc., increased in price at the same 
time as the value of the franc diminished. 
As business was so prosperous, a good 
many manufacturers went ahead with 
their purchases, and got stocks at very 
high prices. Then, of course, with the 
high cost of living, wages had to be 
raised, thus increasing again the prices 
of all manufactured goods. 

Such was the state of things last May. 
At that time, the slump on the Japanese 
market took place, followed by the one 
in America. England was then hit, and 
France, momentarily protected by the 
low exchange, held better. 

However, after the exchange market 
here had begun to drop, and people 
having lost money, were less in a posi- 
tion to buy, the crisis came by degrees, 



and now it has reached the worst period 
— at least, let us hope so! 

In every class of business, there are 
thousands of unemployed workmen, and 
although prices are beginning to decline, 
nobody will take the risk of buying. We 
have a kind of buyers' strike: everybody 
is anticipating lower prices, and patient- 
ly awaits them. Clothes, boots, furs, 
are worn until the last minute, and re- 
placed only when it is absolutely neces- 
sary. In the food lines, even, the trades- 
men complain that people won't waste 
anything and buy strictly what they 
need. The fact of it is that, since 
everybody has now to pay their rent, 
taxes, etc., money is getting quite scarce. 

In the wholesale business, the situ- 
ation is no better than in the retail. 
Dealers have heavy manufactured stocks 
unsold, the greater part of which will 
have to be greatly depreciated, as the 
trade here is almost entirely devoted to 
novelties, which lose their value from 
one season to another. 

Cloth Makers Worried 

In the cloth houses, they are very 
anxious about next year. They say that 
the Spring season was good, and then 
they bought wool, silk, cotton at high 
prices, for next Spring. The materials 
were manufactured under these condi- 
tions, and they are bound, even by sel- 
ling at cost price, to quote high figures 
for their novelties, which their clients 
will not accept. Considering the state 
of mind of the customers who buy only 
when they can't help it, in view of better 
conditions, one does not see one's way 
through this dilemma. 

In the shoe trade, the conditions are 
about the same: manufactured stocks are 
heaped in the factories, people will not 
pay the prices wanted for boots or 
shoes, highly fashionable, it is true, but 
ridiculously expensive, and the retailer 
cannot buy if he does not sell his goods. 

Furriers Carry Big Burden 

The fur trade is severely hit too: the 
stocks unsold are large enough to sup- 
ply all next year's requirements, and, 
if this Winter's crop is somewhat im- 
portant, the prices of last year's collec- 



tion, which by now is stale, will decrease 
all the more as the dealers will only 
pay small prices for the fresh goods. 
The decline is already felt in the staple 
furs, such as skunk, racoon, oppossum; 
coneys have gone down from 40 to 50 
per cent. As to the French "sauvag- 
ine": fitch, mole, stone and baum mar- 
tens, the price offered for this Win- 
ter's collection is less than half what 
was paid last year. 

This bad situation is rendered worse 
by the numerous bankruptcies that take 
place daily all over Europe, involving 
almost every firm, to a more or less 
large extent, and also by the unwilling- 
ness of the banks to grant credits. 

Depression First Half of Year 

The general opinion here is that this 
state of things will prevail during the 
first six months of the coming year: 
in fact everybody expects the year 1921 
to be worse than 1920. In the latter 
part, though, when people have exhaust- 
ed their stocks, demands will spring up 
again from all parts, and a slight in- 
crease on the prices then prevailing may 
take place, but it will last only as long 
as that "boom" does. Then, we shall 
probably see things settled once more, 
for the benefit of everybody. 

Before then, keen competition will be 
expected, especially if, as anticipated, a 
decrease takes place in the prices of 
coal, silk, cotton and wool, freight 
charges, etc., and if the value of the 
franc improves. 

At any rate, it is a general belief 
that, as a rule, all staple articles, in 
every line of business, will show an im- 
portant decrease, while fancy goods, and 
novelties will hold up at least for some 
time yet. 

Of course, these are only prognostics, 
but I sincerely hope they may prove true, 
for it would be much better for us to 
make a serious effort and get out of the 
present unsettled situation, no matter 
what we lose. 

By letting the disease get worse no 
one knows what the result may be. 

With best wishes for a New Year 
more prosperous than the one foreseen 
above, I remain, 



Yours very truly, 




Dry Goods Review 



87 



Regina Trading Company's New Store 

Fine New Building, Beautifully Equipped, Opened to the Public in December— Handsome 

Hall for Use of Clubs and Organizations Finely Appointed— Women Making Good 

in Very Responsible Positions - - All Store Features Reflect Up-to-date 

•Policy of Establishment 



INTEREST in the new store of the 
Regina Trading Company has reached 
a high pitch in Regina and its ad- 
jacent territory. In the first place the 
debentures for the erection of the new 
building were sold locally during 1920. 
In the next place the building has been 
erected in the heart of the city and on 
a most desirable site. Visitors to the 
city are escorted with much pride on the 
part of citizens to the splendid class 
of buildings, all comparatively new, sur- 
rounding Victoria Square. There are 
blocks of office buildings, Y. M. C. A., 
Y. W. C. A., and library buildings. Three 
fine churches, and now this latest edi- 
fice which was opened to the public 
on December 11th, 1920. 

For Entertainments 

To say that this new store building 
was opened to the public is more strict- 
ly true in this case than in many, for 
the top floor has been admirably ar- 
ranged for day and evening fetes. It is 
entirely given over to a banquet room, 
dining room, ladies' club room for after- 
noon teas, rest room, men's smoking 
room, lavatories, a public cloak room and 
checking system, large rotunda with 
handsomely upholstered chairs, a kitchen 
with complete electric fitings. Already 
six city clubs meet, one each day, on 
this floor, and many social events of 
prominence have taken place there. The 
Trading Company is fast becoming a 
favorite rendezvous and the splendid 
window and interior displays find ad- 
mirers and new customers daily. 

Excellent Store Planning. 

Manager Little, in an interview with 
Dry Goods Review's representative, ex- 
pressed much satisfaction with the lay- 
out of the several floors and depart- 
ments. There are no high fixtures; cus- 
tomers may view the whole of each 
floor without an obstruction. The layout 
of the ground floor is unique in that 
the show cases and counters are ar- 
ranged along the walls in continuous 
three-sided squares like the "Wall of 
Troy" design. This arrangement is es- 
pecially advantgeous for sales or for 
displaying goods at any time, so that 
there is a maximum of both store ser- 
vice and self-service and a minimum of 
inconvenience to customers at all times. 
There are circles through the central 
part of the floor and also the cash-tube 
stations. Dry goods, dress goods and 
drugs are the main floor departments. 

The first floor up claims to be the 
largest department in Western Canada 




PULUNGUPTHE STAKES 



No 

Refunds 

or 

Exchanges 



Prices That Defy Competition Are a Feature o f Our 

Silks— Dress Goods— Laces 




Women's Gloves Vestees For Winter Suits 

,,. Taa. BUcV c, friir All .ir,v tO J Q "»«--'"«««*» «• 
II, pukr 13.00 p.ti... **.!» 



CHILDREN 3 


;'"-;; - S2.45 


^irj"i"-**-** 


A TAB LI Or RPMEP.3 


WHITE KID 

$9.85 


"Cross-Strap" V^k 



SILK GLOVES- ««>.]».■ . 1 nr J| tq. 1 »ljtj Douhlc- 
ti|.f>nl Ongtri. AisortH "ilort. H*fru- #1 OQ 




Something' To Look At 



The type of ad. featured in the Regina daily papers by the Regina Trading Co. 



used exclusively for men's and boys' ap- 
parel. Everything required "cap a pied" 
for men and boys is located on this 
floor. The second floor is similarly com- 
plete for women's and girls' require- 
ments and new manicure and hairdress- 
ing parlors, also a rest room and a com- 
plete infants' department are located on 
this floor. The ladies' department is ar- 
ranged with back to back wardrobe cases 
at right angles to the walls and fitting 
rooms between each of these divisions. 
The saleslady thus does not have to 
leave her own department in order to 
fit garments on a customer. Show cases 
and wax models display garments 
throughout the department and a large 



stock is available in the wardrobe cases. 

A mezzanine floor above the ground 
floor houses the manager's office, the 
advertising office, the cash office for 
the pneumatic system, and other offices. 

The furniture throughout the store is 
mahogany, while the lighting system is 
equipped with large globe lights and 
brass chains; smokless boilers are used 
with the steam heating. 

Woman Heads Adv. Dept. 

A couple of years ago Dry Goods 
Review called the attention of its read- 
ers to the fact that the Regina Trading 
Company had secured the services of 
(Continued on next page) 



B8 



Dry Goods Review 



No Fears in New Year Outlook 

Many Facts Apparent in Business Conditions at the Present Time 

Justify an Optimistic Viewpoint — The Buying Strike on the Part 

of the Public Only Temporary. 

Written by C. J. MORRIS 



ANEW year has been ushered in — 
one to which every man in the 
trade should be able to look for- 
ward without fear or misgiving, even if, 
owing to the temporary buying strike 
on the part of the public, the demand for 
goods has recently been less insistent 
than it has been during the last few 
years of easy sales and high pi-ices. 

Many keen business men claim that 
the newspaper press has been to a large 
degree responsible for the falling off in 
business which has occurred of late, and 
to some extent no doubt the forecasts 
given by the daily press of falling prices 
have caused many people to postpone 
making purchases in the expectation that 
by so doing they would be able to buy 
much more cheaply later on. Some, on 
the other hand, believe that the real 
cause of the quieter business conditions 
is to be traced to the fall in values of all 
kinds of agricultural products. 

Tightens the Purse Strings 

It is true that the value of the grain 
crops even at present prices exceeds the 
value of the smaller crops of last year, 
but when the farmer sees himself faced 
with the necessity of accepting a much 
lower rate for all his products than that 
on which he had been calculating, it is 
only natural that he should tighten his 
purse strings and keep in reserve against 
the proverbial rainy day that portion of 
his savings which, under different circum- 
stances, he might have been inclined to 
spend. The opinion that this is what has 
occurred is supported by the fact that 
the savings in the banks in November, 
1920, stood at a figure $154,000,000 higher 
than in November the previous year. 
This disinclination on the part of the 
agricultural community to make pur- 
chases has been reflected in the lessened 
demand for industrial products, resulting 
in a certain amount of unemployment, 
working on short time or reduced wages, 
and a consequent diminishing purchasing 
power of the industrial community. 

The Foreign Situation 

Looking still further for the primary 
cause of the fall in values, careful ob- 
servers will see that the disorganization 
of the foreign markets resulting from 
the failure of a large part of Europe to 
return to pre-war conditions is the fun- 
damental cause of the whole trouble. 
There would have been no surplus of 
wheat, cotton, wool, leather or copper, or 
indeed of any other commodity, if those 
in Europe who are in need of these pro- 
ducts, who in fact are in grievous suffer- 




ing for lack of them, were in a position to 
buy and pay for them. Wheat is down 
because those who need it have not the 
money wherewith to buy it. Owing to 
their failure to start reproducing they 
have nothing they can offer us in ex- 
change for it. Those prophets who a 
year or two back foretold a world short- 
age and consequent rise in price of wool, 
leather, cotton, and other raw materials 
because the world could not produce 
sufficient to satisfy its needs failed to 
remember that to need something does 
not necessarily include the ability to pay 
for it. 

Can Pay Only in Goods 

The only way in which Europe can pay 
for what she needs is by sending us 
goods or products in exchange. To do 
this she must produce, and to produce 
she must get back to something resem- 
bling pre-war conditions of stability. 
Once she has set her house in order and 
devoted herself to production she will 
soon regain her purchasing power. Our 
surplus products will then again be in 
demand. This will restore the purchasing 
power of our people, with a consequent 
revival of domestic demand for our in- 
dustrial products resulting in a return 
to prosperous conditions all round. 

Apart however from these considera- 
tions, a considerable degree of optimism 
is justifiable with respect to Canada's 
business outlook for this coming year. 
Immigration promises to be exceedingly 
heavy, perhaps breaking all previous 
records. The exchange premium on U.S. 
money, while affecting our purchases 
there, gives us a great advantage as com- 
petitors in U.S. markets. Food prices 
show an undoubted tendency to gradu- 
ally return to a normal basis which will 
be a large factor in alleviating labor un- 
rest, and there is still a large amount of 
purchasing power in our own people 
which, though it has been lately held in 
restraint for one reason or another, is 
only dormant and liable to be revived as 
soon as prices show evidence of returning 
to a settled basis. 



The retailer can therefore look forward 
with equanimity and confidence to the 
coming months, secure in the knowledge 
that though he may find a more extended 
scope and perhaps a greater need for the 
exercise of his selling ability than has 
of late been apparent, the business is 
here to hand, sufficient to make the year 
1921 no less a successful one than that 
of its immediate predecessors. 



REGINA TRADING COMPANY'S 
NEW STORE 

(Continued from page 87) 

Miss Murphy as advertising manager — 
the only woman holding a similar posi- 
tion in Western Canada. Miss Murphy's 
work since then has been an asset to 
the Trading Company and has figured 
strongly in its announcements during the 
past year. Previous to moving to the 
new store the company put on a "pulling- 
up-stakes" sale for two weks. The class 
of advertising is best described by the 
accompanying sample — three pages of 
this type shown appeared in one issue. 
Manager Little, when asked Whether 
people are still inclined to buy in the 
face of declining markets, replied that 
their moving sale brought in just double 
the returns which they had anticipated. 

"Peggy," the personal shopper for 
mail orders, has been doing good work 
for the Company for several years and 
her advice and suggestions are a strong- 
hold for out of town custom. 

Altogether the Regina Trading Com- 
pany is an institution which bespeaks 
the stability and promise of western 
merchandising. The trade generally will 
join with Dry Goods Review in extend- 
ing congratulations to the Company and 
wishing it every success. 



APPOINTED REPRESENTATIVES 

O'Brien Allan & Company, Winnipeg, 
have been recently appointed western 
representatives for the DeLong Hook & 
Eye Company. 



OFFERED BIG REDUCTION 

A. J. Freiman, Rideau Street, Ottawa, 
began the New Year with a Great Wash 
Goods Sale at prices he declared from 
50 to 75 per cent, less than those of 
last season. A personal guarantee went 
with all purchases, "Satisfaction or your 
money refunded." 



D'-ij Goods Review 



89 



Can the Window Pay the Rent? 

The Beginning of a New Year is an Opportunity to Give Careful Consideration to the Im- 
portance of the Window — Your Window Should Pay Big Profits — What Change 

Will Improve Its Capacity for Display? 

By ROY A. HUNTER, Vancouver 



VANCOUVER, Jan. 12. — At the 
threshold of the new year, when 
each merchant is deciding for him- 
self what changes for the better he can 
make, what departments can be made to 
produce more, and in what direction he 
can increase his sales effort, the window 
should come in for a careful scrutiny. 

Can it be made to pay the rent? What 
change would improve its display capa- 
city? Is it easily kept clean? 

For tips on running a dry goods store, 
the writer hastens down to a successful 
merchant, but for tips on the use of win- 
dows for sales, the place to go is to a 
man that makes that his business, and 
can earn ten thousand a year, based on 
the profit he can make the windows earn. 

Such a man is C. L. Greer, display 
manager for the Hudson's Bay Co., Van- 
couver. Discussing the sales possibilities 
of the even smaller-than-average store 
window Mr. Greer says: 

If Goods Were Locked in Cupboards 

"Seventy-five per cent, of the mer- 
chandise that is sold is not absolutely 
needed at the time it is bought. This is 
true to a less extent in staple lines, 
but of fancy lines, where the great- 
est profit is made, it is just as true as 
it is in ladies' wear. 

"If you don't think so, imagine your 
volume of business, if all your merchan- 
dise were kept in closed boxes till 
brought out on demand. Consider the 
splendid little memory joggers that your 
shelves full of attractive merchandise are. 
Notice almost any sale you make over the 
counter, how items are added, one at a 
time, after scanning your shelves for 
suggestions. The more pointed the sug- 
gestion, the more impressive it is. The 
more real the implied desirability, the 
more your sales. 

"Merchandise attractively presented is 
partially sold. If the presentation is 
good enough — the interest and desire of 
the passer-by sufficiently intrigued, the 
sale will be completed right there — that 
is — if you have the price on the article, 
and the would-be purchaser has the cash 
or the credit to negotiate. 

The Feature of the Offering 

"One must decide first, what is the 
strong feature of the offering. If, for 
instance, you have made a splendid pur- 
chase of silk hose and purpose to 
move them at $1.50 a pair, you will need 
nothing more than good arrangement of 
the hose in the window and a large card 
saying $1.50 a pair. 

"But suppose they are a very fine qual- 




,/ >.\ 



6 







ity of heavy silk hose, then you must pro- 
ceed differently. You must display them 
in an "atmosphere" of quality and refine- 
ment. Let them be accompanied by other 
smart accessories that will enhance their 
appeal and not detract from the interest 
of the goods shown for sale. 

"Name the price? Yes! Always. But 
in this case the price will be in light fig- 
ures, on a small card. Not in poster 
style, like your $1.00 bargain. 

Windows That Mean Sales 

"Many retailers are still loath to adver- 
tise. The larger stores advertise very pro- 
fitably — very profitably, or they certainly 
would not be doing it. In the same way a 
great many dealers hesitate to spend a 
few dollars for fixtures with which to 
make proper window displays. A few 
such helps are invaluable in producing 
an effective window. Now don't mis- 
understand me. By an effective window 
I do not mean an 'art-for-art's-sake' 
kind of window, I mean the window that 
is artfully dressed to create a demand for 
the articles displayed, that will be con- 
verted into actual sales over the counter. 

"If you had an announcement to make 
about a certain line of merchandise that 
you wanted special attention drawn to, 
and had a man employed to make an- 
nouncements in front of your store, would 
you, while he was speaking, have a dozen 
other people shouting out the names of a 
dozen other articles you had in stock ? 

Let It Be Only One Line 

"Think that over, next time you put 
in a special in your front window, and 
then proceed to clutter up the beholder's 
•attention with a dozen other unrelated 
lines. If you want attention on the 
quality and price of your new season's 



silk range — let it be a silk window, with 
no other exhibits in the window to take 
the attention off the lines featured. Let 
there be an idea behind your window if 
you're putting in an assortment of com- 
modities. 

Should Pay Big Profits 

"These are just a few random thoughts. 
Your windows should pay you big profits. 
If you have neither the time nor inclina- 
tion to dress a good window every week — 
pay a few dollars to some one to do it 
for you. Check up carefully the sales 
you make on the lines displayed. You 
will be surprised." 



In The Market 
Right Along For 
Everyday Needs 

The following optimistic forecast ap- 
peared in a recent issue of the Wall 
Street Journal: 

"Leading silk manufacturers and job- 
bers believe their industry has seen the 
worst. They look ' for improvement in 
1921, and, although there are many small 
dealers with weakly held stocks, the bulk 
of the silk held by leading people can 
be marketed as opportunity offers. 

"Prices recently have advanced be- 
tween 15 and 20 per cent, in the last 
three weeks. It is interesting to note 
that in spite of the rise, retailers are 
sending in orders indicating they have 
cleaned their shelves of silk. 

"It is a fact that several of the larg- 
est dry goods stores in New York stop- 
ped buying silk, except as necessity de- 
manded, as long ago as last March, and 
this, of course, means that these stores 
are in the market right along for their 
every-day needs. 

"Silk manufacturing has practically 
been at a standstill in this country for 
the last six months and with the spurt 
in demand with a small amount of raw 
material in the country, there is a like- 
lihood of further advance in prices in 
the immediate future." 



IN NEW PREMISES. 

The firm of J. O. Bourcier and Co., 
silk importers of Montreal, have recently 
taken possession of their new premises 
facing on Victoria Square, where they 
will occupy the entire ground floor. This 
change will permit the firm to handle its 
expansion of business more adequately. 



90 



Dry (loads Review 

Eastern Ontario R.M.A. Convention 



About Two Hundred Delegates Present — Sir Henry Drayton Addresses Delegates at Banquet 
—Strong Plea for Greater Organization by President Henry Watters of Ottawa. 



By Special Correspondent of Dry Goods Review 



UPWARDS of two hundred dele- 
gates attended the third annual 
convention of the Eastern On- 
tario and Ottawa District section of the 
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada 
held at Victoria Hall, Brockville, on Jan- 
uary 11th and 12th. Many important 
questions bearing on the retail trade 
were dealt with, including a discussion 
on the form of taxation likely to succeed 
the abolition of the luxury tax. The con- 
vention unanimously endorsed the pro- 
posal of the Dominion Board that what- 
ever tax is decided upon it should be im- 
posed either at the point of importation 
or manufacture and that it be absorbed 
in the cost of goods quoted to the retailer 
and so collected as all other revenue is. 
The convention endorsed daylight sav- 
ing, condemned false advertising and 
took steps to prosecute those who violate 
this law and set in motion machinery to 
manufacturers' sales in retail stores: 

Address By Finance Minister 

A feature of the convention was the 
address by the Minister of Finance, Sir 
Henry Drayton. Sir Henry courageous- 
ly defended the luxury tax as a neces- 
sary measure to curb reckless extrava- 
gance and the purchase of luxuries and 
thanked the retail merchants of Canada 
for the inconvenience they had suffered 
in helping to lower the cost of living. 
Justifying the tax, Sir Henry pointed out 
that the index figure of commodity costs 
had dropped from 263 in May of 1920 to 
234 in October. Having accomplished 
this, the tax was abolished. The Minister 
of Finance made a strong appeal for the 
discontinuance of unnecessary purchases 
in the United States so that the very 
unfavorable trade balance could be right- 
ed; and the convention subsequently 
went on record as favoring purchases 
more exclusively of Canadian or British 
goods. 

The Opening Session 

Mayor J. M. Dobbie, of Brockville, ex- 
tended a hearty welcome to the dele- 
gates. In doing so, he referred to their 
growing strength as a factor in the busi- 
ness and political life of Canada and is- 
sued a timely warning that only by con- 
certed, rather than independent action 
could they hope to accomplish their 
legitimate purposes. 

Robert Craig, president of the Brock- 
ville Retail Merchants' Association, also 
extended a welcome and on behalf of the 
local Commercial Travellers' Association 
invited the attending delegates to make 



free use of their quarters while in the 
city. , i 

Major Paterson, one of the oldest 
members of the R. M. A., in speaking of 
the work of the organization, expressed 
the opinion that the retail merchants of 
Canada as an organized body had a great 
future ahead of them. Only by a com- 
bined effort, by putting their shoulder to 
the wheel, could they get their just due. 
Their organization was only in its in- 
fancy. Members were gradually realiz- 
ing its importance and were soliciting 
their brother merchants to become mem- 
bers, knowing that if every merchant in 
Canada were a member the association 
would wield a much greater power than 
it does. Every member would now ad- 
mit that he was receiving much greater 
benefit through the association than was 
represented by the fee he paid. 

Secretary E. M. Trowern, of the Do- 
minion Board, said the R. M. A. had been 
started 25 years ago the coming Novem- 
ber by five people. Today 87 people 
were giving their entire time to this 
work from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 
On a moment's notice they could now get 
in intimate touch with every province in 
the Dominion. Retail merchants were 
the largest tax payers of any class in 
Canada and, when properly organized, 
should be able to say to any provincial or 
federal government that a problem af- 
fecting their business should be settled 
either this or that way. Where would 
retailers have been today if they had not 
been able to say to the government that 
the luxury tax should be abolished? It 
had been abolished and other things det- 
rimental to the retail trade must also be 
abolished. 

President Watters' Address 

President Henry Watters, of Ottawa, 
who presided throughout, addressed the 
convention briefly before it began its de- 
liberations. The president said that the 
men they needed at the convention were 
not present, men who had made a success 
of their own business and did not feel 
the need of the association's assistance. 
Perhaps this might be said equally of 
men who had worked in the interests of 
the association for a quarter of a cen- 
tury. In the last • analysis, each man 
must stand or fall by those qualities of 
head and heart with which he was en- 
dowed. All men, however, were not en- 
dowed with a high sense of rectitude and 
honor that they should have, and were 
not alive to spotting bad conditions of 
business or discovering obstacles in the 
way of successful merchandising. Mem- 



bers of the association were merchants 
who had discovered such obstacles and 
as thoughtful men were participating in 
the work of the organization. 

Ontario President Speaks 

Much more could be accomplished, 
said the president, if all merchants were 
members of the association. They could 
then be a greater factor in the molding 
of public opinion. Retail merchants 
should be the best organized body that 
could be had for the betterment of trade 
and trade conditions. He had no ob- 
jections to Boards of Trade to look after 
local matters where there was no organ- 
ized body of retail merchants. But he 
felt after many years of study that no 
body of men that does not represent in 
large numbers the activities of the retail 
merchants can accomplish those special 
objects which the retail merchants have 
in view. No one line of business could 
accomplish benefits for the whole retail 
trade; he had discovered this during the 
fight against the luxury tax, which was 
a problem for so many lines of trade. 
Their best interests as retail distributors 
could only be accomplished by such an 
organization as the Retail Merchants' 
Association covering the whole of Can- 
ada. 

B. W. Ziemann, the Ontario president, 
referred to the great work which the as- 
sociation had to perform. As yet only 
a handful of the men in active business 
were organized. The real profiteers 
among merchants were those who were 
receiving all the benefits that had been 
worked out by the association but who 
were giving nothing or doing nothing to 
help its work and workers. It was not 
altogether their money that was needed 
but their influence on the commercial 
life of Canada if alive to the interests of 
the community at large. Men should be 
in business for the benefit of the service 
they can give to their fellow men, and so 
should do all they can to help their fellow 
men rather than give their whole time 
to the accumulating of a little money. 

Treasurer's and Secretary's Reports 

The report of the treasurer, T. W. 
Collins, showed a surplus of $610.03. The 
secretary's report appears elsewhere in 
this issue. Both reports were adopted. 



"How's business with you?" 
"Out of sight!" 
"What's your line?" 
"Ladies' hose supporters." 



Drii Goods Review 



91 



Hard Work— No Sales— And Value 

Essentials of Success as Outlined by Sherbrooke Merchant— Advertising and Window Display 
— Keeps Clear of the Banker — Is Placing for Spring. 



SUCCESS is not always measured by 
expansion but by the reputation 
which underlies the growth of a 
man's achievement. Because a man may 
possess a large and up-to-date establish- 
ment, it does not necessarily indicate 
that his success is assured, rather does 
one seek for the motives and the prin- 
ciples which have actuated the merchant 
to follow the course he has and whether 
from envy or admiration, endeavor to 
arrive at a just appraisal of his business 
ethics. Nine times out of ten the in- 
vestigator is disappointed by finding that 
instead of a sensational story of unusual 
luck coupled with "pull" and other under- 
hand but only too common incidents of 
modern life, the secret of it all is just 
the old, old story of plain prosaic, hard 
work. 

When a man looks back upon twenty- 
three years in business all alone, twenty- 
three years unmarked by such incidents 
as fires or moves, or even by such a 
thing as a sale, and, at the end of that 
time he finds himself proprietor of the 
largest store of its kind in the city, he 
may be pardoned for a little legitimate 
pride in his own efforts, especially when 
the secret of his success is attributable 
to the above-mentioned factor. 

Such is the unusual record of J. 
Rosenbloom, the well-known clothier and 
haberdasher of Sherbrooke, Que., pro- 
prietor of the "Star" Clothing Hall. The 
"old store with the young spirit" is the 
slogan of the business which has grown 
from a very small origin to its present 
size, comprising four distinct stores — 
clothing, haberdashery, and hats and 
shoes, occupying a very large area of 
floor space and boasting four large dis- 
play windows. 

Three Essentials of Success 

The age in which we live is the age 
of youth. To be successful in any line 
of life one needs unbounded energy and 
a spirit of youthfulness which alone can 
ensure the ambitious man the goal he 
has in view. "How can a retailer do 
business successfully to-day?" was the 
query put to Mr. Rosenbloom, and the 
answer came as follows: "Give the pub- 
lic value for its money and do not mis- 
represent a single article in any way. 
Keep the youthful spirit to the fore and 
insist upon giving prompt service and 
the newest merchandise." 

"I never held a sale," continued Mr. 
Rosenbloom, as I don't need to reduce 
any lines in order to move them. They 
move quickly enough because I pride 
myself upon buying only for spot cash 
and pricing my goods at the lowest pos- 
sible margin of profits. Furthermore, 




mm^ m 



I own my own building and keep over- 
head expense down to a minimum. This 
policy has made my business the largest 
of its kind in Sherbrooke and quite as 
progressive as any in Canada. 

Advertising and Display 

Mr. Rosenbloom has been a firm be- 
liever in the power of daily advertising 
in the past, and his clean-cut and at- 
tractively laid out copy has always been 
a feature of the Sherbrooke papers. Mr. 
Rosenbloom believes mow that the better 
class store will not centralize its pub- 
licity efforts upon journalistic adver- 
tisements solely but will devote an equal 
amount of money and effort to make 
its windows radiate the spirit of the 
store within. "I am experimenting with 
my four windows," said Mr. Rosenbloom, 
"and am almost convinced now that four 
displays, representing each branch of 
my range of merchandise is not so pro- 
fitable in the end as four windows 
full of one line of goods only and chang- 
ed as often as possible would be. In my 
opinion the man in the street is more im- 
pressed by a very comprehensive show- 
ing of one line of goods in all colorings 
and styles than he would be by four dif- 
ferent windows full of goods. He says 
to himself that here is a store which 
seems to carry a large variety of styles, 
and so he is prevailed on to come in. By 
putting only seasonable goods in the win- 
dows when adopting this plan, it is very 
easy to awaken the right degree of in- 
terest in your stock. For my part I 
would prefer to keep a display man just 
for this work and none other, changing 
goods at least twice a week and en- 
deavoring to make my windows as at- 
tractive as any advertisement could be." 

Salesmanship 

Another important point in successful 
merchandising, according to Mr. Rosen- 
bloom, is the psychology of salesman- 
ship. "It is most essential to minimize 
the expenses incidental to overhead and 



an efficient sales staff is the besl asset 
a store can possess," he said. "When 
one's clientele is drawn from office, farm 
or railroad, one needs a more able sales 
force than would be required in the case 
of a purely city store. The farmer us- 
ually requires a much longer time to 
serve than the city man, and there is 
much more fuss incidental to serving 
him, still he has his advantages as a 
customer. At the end of a season, 
thanks to the farmer, I never have any 
clothing to carry over for the simple 
reason that he knows that whatever I 
do not wish to carry over I will let him 
have at a slight discount, and I do not 
need to advertise this fact. They do 
not require the same styles as the city 
men and when it is understood that the 
garments are first-class stock I never 
fail to clear out all my superfluous lines 
on a slight discount basis. Strictly 
speaking, though, I believe in a one- 
price business for all, and I hope the 
day will come when the farmer will 
realize the wisdom of it." 

Dangerous Delay 

In reply to a query as to prospects 
for next season in the clothing line, Mr. 
Rosenbloom stated that he had not felt 
any marked decline in business and 
therefore had placed whatever orders 
he needed. He was of the opinion that 
delay is dangerous when it concerns the 
matter of Spring placing. He has al- 
ways believed it better to take a legiti- 
mate loss of profit. 

"If a retailer has been shrewd in his 
own merchandising," concluded Mr. 
Rosenbloom, "he will not require any 
assistance from bankers, and in my own 
experience I have found it best to keep 
clear of any speculation whatever." 



HOW TO REDEEM LUXURY TAX 
STAMPS 

Merchants are instructed to make out 
a list showing the total number of un- 
cancelled and unused stamps of each 
denomination in their possession and 
add up the same in money value. The 
list should then be forwarded to the 
local collector of customs, who will in 
turn forward it to the taxation offices of 
the Dominion Government. When these 
returns are verified, checks will be issued 
to the merchants. 

Cancelled luxury stamps will not be 
redeemable. This will affect some of the 
large departmental stores, where there 
was only one machine and where many 
hundreds of dollars' worth of stamps 
were cancelled at once for the several 
departments. 



92 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



Greenshields Ltd., Hold 

Annual Sales Conference 

Representatives From Five Large Divisions Attend Meetings in 

Montreal and Review Year's Work — Big Banquet. 

at Montreal Club. 



THE second annual sales confer- 
ence of the firm of Greenshields, 
Ltd., took place on the 14th and 
loth of December last, when representa- 
tives of five district sales divisions, to- 
gether with members of the executive 
and the board of directors, met together 
for the purpose of comparing results of 
the year's work and discussing the trend 
of conditions at the present time. 

A conference room was arranged in 
the Greenshield building on Victoria 
Square and two sessions were held there 
daily, when many interesting addresses 
were given by members of the staff, 
which were followed by open discusion. 

Altogether there were some 88 travel- 
ers present and two very profitable 
days were spent in the discussion of the 
many problems confronting the whole- 
sale trade at the present season. A very 
cleverly designed booklet was prepared in 
honor of the event which was printed 
on the firm's own multigraph, illustrated 
by the firm's own artist, and the read- 
ing matter prepared and edited by one 
of the firm's sales managers. The sub- 
jects of the addresses which were deliv- 
ered by members of the firm at each 
session of the conference were upon de- 
partmental affairs, and were brief in 
each case, the emphasis being laid upon 
the open discussion which followed, dur- 
ing which many interesting points of 
view were heard. Altogether some ten 
addresses were given. 

After the papers and addresses were 
concluded and all past business dispensed 
with, the gathering took up the question 
of the outlook for 1921. Beginning from 
the extreme far West, the whole of the 
Dominion of Canada was reviewed from 
a commercial point of view, each pro- 
vince and section of province in which 
the firm of Greenshields was represented 
was dealt with in turn, seventeen dif- 
ferent regions being included. This fea- 
ture of the session was a tribute to the 
expansion of the firm and its thorough- 
ness and strength, demonstrating aa it 
did the power of the dry goods trade 
as a means of linking up the remote 
parts of the Dominion with the largest 
centres of commerce. Emphasis was 
laid upon the need for optimism regard- 
ing the future, and the belief was ex- 
pressed by the president, Mr. E. C. B. 
Fetherstonhaugh, in his speech that the 
year 1921 would bring renewed prosperi- 
ty to the merchants of Canada. The same 
optimism was endorsed by the other 
members of the executive, Messrs. Geo. 



B. Fraser and Geo. L. Cains, in their 
addresses. 

Staff Dinner 

On Tuesday evening, December 14th, 
a banquet was held at the Montreal 
Club when 152 guests were present. A 
feature of the gathering was the fact 
that at each of the small tables the 
guests were carefully chosen to repre- 
sent widely different parts of the Do- 
minion, so that all should have an equal 
opportunity of becoming better acquaint- 
ed with one another. A choice menu 
was partaken of, which was followed by 
music and four speeches, including toasts 
to the King and to "Ourselves." 

The banquet was considerably enliv- 
ened by music provided by professional 
entertainers, and several original songs 
added to the amusement of the occasion. 
Among the latter, a song, entitled, "The 
House on the Square," was rendered, to 
the tune of "Mother Machree," jnd sung 
by the whole gathering, a very artistic 
song-book being provided as a souvenir 
for the guests. 

While the conference was in session 
the members were enabled to enjoy two 
very insti-uctive and interesting excur- 
sions to the factories of the Dominion 
Textile and the Canadian Linoleum Com- 
panies in the vicinity of Montreal, where 
the various processes incidental to the 
manufacture of cotton fabrics and floor 
coverings were fully explained and dem- 
onstrated by the management. The con- 
ference also marked the inauguration of 
a new body, namely an association of 
travellers, which will be presided over 
by Alex. Cook, Esq., and before which 
all grievances and problems will be sub- 
mitted for adjustment. 

Firm's Fine Policy 

The keynote of the whole gathering 
was optimism, and a spirit of comrade- 
ship and good fellowship was a marked 
characteristic of both business and so- 
cial events. The ethics of the firm were 
constantly held up before the staff in 
the course of the two days' conference, 
and such aims as the following were em- 
phasized as being the only factors in 
the game of life worth while striving 
for. "To make the most of the business 
by making the most of yourself, merit 



begets confidence, confidence begets en- 
thusiasm, enthusiasm conquers the- 
world." 

The motto of the firm figured promi- 
nently among the many slogans eulo- 
gizing the success of the name of Green- 
shield, and the history of this old firm, 
dating as it does, back to the year 1834, 
is simply yet truly summed up by the 
four word motto: "By Honourable In- 
dustry Increasing." 



Extensions Give 
Firms Chance To 
Liquidate Stocks 

That the slump in the dry goods and 
clothing trades is but temporary is 
exemplified in the method that is now 
being adopted to handle the situation 
arising out of inability of some whole- 
sale firms to meet their obligations. For- 
merly these firms would be declared 
insolvent and would pass into receiver- 
ship. Now they are placed in what are 
called quiet receiverships. Bankruptcy 
declarations are avoided by the receiver 
of the business arranging with the cred- 
itors to grant credit extensions some- 
times for periods as long as a year. This 
gives opportunity to liquidate valuable 
stocks now on hand without forcing the 
distressed house out of business. Cred- 
itors are also assured of payment in full 
of moneys owing them. 

"What is happening is this," said Mr. 
N. L. Martin, assignee and liquidator. 
"Many firms last year when it seemed 
impossible to have orders filled, placed 
their orders in duplicate and triplicate. 
The manufacturers are now prepared to 
fill these orders and local wholesalers 
find themselves overstocked. Retailers 
have cancelled orders. The result is that 
many wholesalers are unable to (im- 
mediately meet their obligations." 

This system, it is said, preserves busi- 
ness stability and prevents the great loss 
to capital incident to the old system of 
allowing these temporarily embarrassed 
firms to become insolvent and have their 
assets sold for what they will bring, 
often less than fifty per cent, of their 
value. The present procedure is to name 
a committee of creditors to either oper- 
ate or supervise the business until it is 
rehabilitated. 




TO REDUCE STOCKS 

Bryson-Graham, Limited, Sparks St., 
Ottawa, had special window displays in 
which the great values offered for the 
January clearance sales advertised to 
start on Tuesday, the 4th, drew much 
interest over the week-end, the last few 
days of 1920. So generous are the re- 
ductions that the firm believe that the 
desire to reduce heavy stocks before the 
annual inventory will be accomplished. 



DRY GOODS R E V I E W 



93 




'.'} 



1) R E S S FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 




Announcement for Spring 

The reluctancy of many merchants to stock up in Dress Goods, 
due to the uncertainty of the market in general, has left many 
bare spots in certain numbers. 

Now is the time to fill in and bring your Dress Goods Depart- 
ment to a state of completion. 

Spring sees an entirely new range of PRIESTLEYS' Dress Goods, 
including the following: 



COLORS (ALL WOOL) 

Ancona Serge 
Raleigh Serge 
Desmond Serge 
Calamar Cords 
Pandora Poplin 
Satin Duchess 
Talon Taffeta 
Broad Cloths 



BLACKS 



Wool Tricona 
Gabardines 
Melrose 
Cashmeres 
Permette 

Sebastapool 
Mohairs 



The leading shades for Spring are Sand, Rose, Taupe, Elephant, Reindeer, 
Kangaroo, King Fisher, Pekin, Tobacco, Wine, Navy, Black. 




We have also a complete stock of French and 
British all-wool Dress Goods in all colors in the 
following lines: 

Coating and Botany Serge — Poplins — Tricotines 
— Gabardines — Roxanas — Striped and Plain 
Armures — Fancy. Skirting Checks and Stripes 



All prices were reduced to replacement value on the 1st of January. 
SAMPLES SENT ON APPLICATION 

GREENSHIELDS LIMITED 



"Everything in Dry Goods" 



VICTORIA SQUARE 



MONTREAL 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 




l>rj 



Dry Goods Revku 



Silks on High Road to Recovery 

Importers Full of Enthusiasm Over Splendid Outlook — Business for 192 1 Already Away 
Ahead of Expectations — Some Orders Being Turned Down — Jap Market Firming 

Up — Upward Trend Begins. 



OPTIMISM pervades the silk mar- 
ket to-day. The silk trade, among 
the first to he hit, is reported 
among the first recoveries. Every im- 
porter and wholesaler is cheerful and 
when silks are mentioned the feeling of 
uncertainty which characterizes discus- 
sion in so many fields is at once dis- 
pelled. 

"It is up to the silk dealer now," said 
one leading Toronto wholesaler. "It lies 
in the hands of his salesmen whether or 
not it is to be a big season. Any man 
who goes on the road with the idea that 
he is going to sell silk will sell it. Our 
men are out now, and orders are pour- 
ing in. The retailers' stocks in silks 
are particularly low and the fact that in 
the first week in January we can show 
8150,000 worth of orders for 1921, in- 
dicates that they are ready to buy and 
are satisfied to buy at the prices quot- 
ed." 

This ■wholesale house showed Dry 
Goods Review their books revealing or- 
ders to this amount at the end of the 
first week in January. From all their 
lingerie travellers for several days they 
had been receiving sheaves of orders 
from merchants who had not bought for 
months. Not only were popular-priced 
silks being asked for but whole ranges 
in better lines were being ordered. A 
very wide demand was being received 
for Japanese habutais in weights use- 
ful for lingerie purposes and children's 
dresses. 

Jap Silks "Coming Back" 

According to information supplied to 
Dry Goods Review by Metsui and Com- 
pany one of the world's largest distrib^ 
uting houses of Japanese silks the Ja- 
panese market is slowly, but surely stif- 
fening and it is expected that the up- 
ward trend which it is claimed must con- 
tinue, to make silk prices safely normal, 
will be noticeable in March and Febru- 
ary. . The Japanese, according to their 
national custom, started with a "clean 
sheet" the first of the year and they 
were offering at price reductions out of 
all proportion. Raw silk production was 
bo badly affected during the recent 
slump that the government was obliged 
to step in and establish a price and the 
farmers are now receiving the benefit 
of this action. Cable advices this month 
from Japan show that raw silk prices 
are firming up considerably, and the 
market is gradually taking on a more 
healthy aspect. American houses are 
buying heavily again, enabling the raw 
silk people to hold out for better prices 
where a short time ago they were will- 



ing to sell for anything they could get — 
even below the cost of production. This 
unfortunate state of affairs rendered the 
financial situation very difficult, and 
Japanese silk growers are now strug- 
gling to retrieve some of their losses, 




To Enhance the Spring 

Two lovely embroidered voiles imported 
from St. Gall, Switzerland, and shown by 
courtesy of Muser Bros., Ltd., Montreal. 
The figured sample is a very handsome silk 
voile in an oriental cobweb design on a 
lovely blue ground now being shown. 



which, in many cases, meant neai ruin. 
Cables during the first week of Janu- 
ary were very optimistic and showed a 
returning independence which indicates 
a decidedly more healthy market. 

Holding Out for Prices. 

That the optimism of . silk merchants 
here is not merely casual is borne out 
by reports from practically every house 
visited. One Toronto house was abls to 
report that they had turned down busi- 
ness. "We have received offers during 
the past few days that we have chosen 
to refuse for the time being," declared 
one importer. "Our customers quoted a 
price lower than we wished to sell at, 
so we .simply declined to fill the orders." 
This attitude augurs well for Spring 
business and shows a better spirit than 
could have been hoped for at such an 
early date. The fact is that silk prices 
had dropped so low as to be in many 
cases far beneath pre-war prices. Such 
a condition could not last and the fact 
that business is so good, and the deal- 
ers determine to bring about more nor- 
mal conditions without unnecessary de- 
lay is one of the best pieces of infor- 
mation that could be received at the 
very outset of 1921. 

Not only Japanese silks, but also 
French, Swiss and American, are com- 
ing to hand in quantities. French and 
Italian silks are especially favored on 
account of the abnormal state of ex- 
change, which by contrast make Swiss 
goods appear rather expensive, but the 
former are reported exceedingly scarce, 
while the latter comprise a very large 
proportion of the coming season's mer- 
chandise. Canadian importers used the 
American market to good advantage dur- 
ing the war, but are turning their at- 
tention in increasing numbers abroad, 
and in this connection are now receiving 
consignments from such important cen- 
tres as Basle, Zurich, etc. (Switzerland 
to-day manufactures every variety of 
silk fabric, except tulle, from the cheap- 
est to the most expensive, and exports 
from 80 to 90 per cent, of the goods 
manufactured.) 

M. Mouterde Interviewed 

The recovery on this side will have a 
cheerful effect upon the European mar- 
kets, more especially the French centres 
where the most depressing sort of pes- 
simism has reigned for several months. 

M. Ch. Mouterde, who is now in Cana- 
da, informed a representative of Dry 
Goods Review when interviewed in Tor- 
onto this month that the Lyons houses 
were in a very depressed state, --no cr- 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



97 




Four Beautiful Novelties 



1. A beautiful blue voile with large beauty floral design. 2. A bronze voile with satin stripe in self tone. 3. An exquisitely 
delicate design in pastels is this figured marquisette. 4. A dainty silk voile in lavender, rose and blue. — Draped and shown by 
\V. R. Brock, Toronto. 



ders had been received to speak of since 
the Autumn and the French houses had 
suffered very much at the hands of 
American customers through heavy can- 
cellations. In view of their struggle to 
huild up this world-famous industry 
which had been so retarded by the war 
the silk manufacturers were undergoing 
additional hardships. M. Mouterde was 
pleased with the cheerful attitude in 
Canada and said that as France had 
been affected by the slump after this 
country it would follow that their re- 
covery would not be apparent until af- 
ter the improvement was noted on this 
sidje. He hoped that business would 
gather some impetus by March or Feb- 
ruary. 

M. Mouterde stated that in France at 
present there was a revived interest in 
Georgettes. The world-renowned de- 
signers were using Georgettes lavishly 
in their new creations; and models orig- 
inated for wear at almost every sort of 
function were being developed in soft 
"drapery" materials, including Georg- 
ettes, crepe de Chines, and a new soft 
silk fabric created for sports wear known 
as "Toile Paysanne." 

Taffetas Scarce 

Taffetas, too, were being widely fea- 
tured in Paris, and in M. Mouterde's opin- 
ion, corroborated by numerous silk deal- 
ers here, it is altogether likely that 
there will be a near famine in dark- 
toned taffetas — especially navy blue. At 
the present time it is very difficult to 
get any quantity of navy taffeta, and 
the make-up trade are featuring it very 
strongly in Spring lines. French silks 
are being offered at a reduction of 33 1-3 
per cent. 

Silk voiles and marquisettes in fancy 
designs such as those in the illustrations 
featuring the novelties in cotton and 
silk fabrics for Spring and Summer, 
1921, are to have a very strong run and 
will be available in one of the best as- 
sortments of color and the biggest range 



of patterns seen for many seasons. Sa- 
tin stripes are to be unusualy smart. 
Among the beautiful novelty patterns 
which are already being shown to the 
Canadian trade for 1921 is an all-silk 
taffeta with figured silk flowers inter- 
woven with tinsel effects, whic'h are 
superb as to design. A warp printed 
velvet on a satin ground in Dresden col- 
orings was also a striking novelty no- 
ticed recently. 

The output from American mills, it 
is said, is only about 10 to 20 per cent, 
of normal, and as very little interest is 
being manifested in the United States 
regarding silks at their present prices, 
it is not expected that many real novel- 
ties will be introduced for the coming 
season. It must be remembered that 
when the cutting-up trade is quiet, large 
stocks of silks are made available for 
open trade, which would not otherwise 
be obtainable. The past few months have 
demonstrated this and one of the import- 
ant results of the change of conditions is 
the fact that fewer and fewer buyers are 
going abroad now for their supplies 
and more and more orders are being 
placed at home. A continuance of this 
feeling will not fail to create a nor- 
mal demand for merchandise which will 
rapidly liquidate surplus supplies and 
place the silk market on something like 
its old basis. 

A prominent American manufacturer 
gives it as his opinion that within about 
two years the inferior qualities of silk 
will not be wanted because standards 
of quality are slowly but surely work- 
ing upwards. 

In this connection, a Montreal im- 
porter holds another theory, namely, 
that there may be a considerable amount 
of substitutes offered in place of the ex- 
cessively high-priced silks for sports and 
evening wear which have been inacces- 
sible to the general public until this 
year. He did not believe the finest qual- 
ities could be offered at much below $7 
per yard and in consequence he feared 



a reactionary demand for cheap substi- 
tutes for Summer, 1921. 

Taffetas to Continue 

In point of popularity of fabric, Dry 
Goods Review is informed that taffeta 
is to lead the van of fashion on this 
side, too, and navy, black, nigger brown 
and changeable effects, will predominate. 
Charmeuse is extremely good for pre- 
sent selling but is expected to decline 
in favor after Easter, as it is essentially 
a Winter fabric. One shade, however, 
termed Japan blue, is being called for 
already, especially for sashes, facings 
and other trimmings where a satin-fin- 
ished silk is preferred. 

Crepe de Chine is promised a revival 
for Summer, 1921, especially in oyster, 
ivory and flesh shades and will rival 
Georgette for fine blouses. Crepe de 
Chine lends itself to both sports and 
dress wear and will be a close follower 
to taffeta. 

Georgette in the better grades has 
come to stay as a staple article, ac- 
cording to a prominent buyer in Mont- 
real. This buyer is enthusiastic over 
the new silk "mai'quisette-voile" fabric 
for Summer, 1921, which is one of the 
few novelties to put in an appearance. 
This fabric, it is claimed, will wash and 
wear perfectly while preserving an ap- 
pearance of silkiness and soft texture, 
quite unusual in the corresponding cot- 
ton fabrics. 

The humble pongee is again obtain- 
able in adequate quantities and will be 
much in demand next season for suits, 
dresses, household furnishing and chil- 
dren's wear. Little interest is shown 
in dyed pongees at present, the principal 
call is for the natural shade. 

The vogue for silk underwear is cre- 
ating an enormous demand for flesh 
shades in all silks, and the Japanese ha- 
butais and ordinary Chinas are reviving 
in favor. Silk tricot fabrics are reported 

(Continued on next page) 






Dry Goods Review 



Textile Industry in Good Position 

Fifty New Factories Added During Past Year — Big Business is Expected, Which Will Be 

Materially Increased With the Circulation of Canadian Money in the Canadian 

Market by Those Who Can Afford to Spend. 



LIGHT is commencing' to dawn from 
out the commercial chaos. And 
dry goods merchants may take 
hope from the particularly favorable 
position in which the textile industry in 
Canada finds itself. Fifty textile factor- 
ies were added to Canada's list during 
the past year, making the total number 
of such industries 450. Financial state- 
ments show that most of these have done 
well, a fact further verified by the plant 
additions now being made and contem- 
plated. These industries have in the 
main kept full work staffs during the 
present era of general unemployment, 
although some slowing down is noted. 

The lesson from this situation is that 
those who have money to spend should 
spend it. And they should spend it in 
Canada. The products of other countries 
are again coming on the Canadian mar- 
ket in competition with our own pro- 
ducts, the volume of which was vastly 
increased during the war. The main- 
tenance of present prosperity, accompan- 
ied by restoration of normal prices, the 
restoration of the Canadian dollar to 
normal value, and the restoration of 
public confidence, can all be accomplish- 
ed by buying Canadian made products 
now. 

Prices Back to Normal 

Spectacular prices for wool and wool 
products resulted from the abnoi-mai 
war demand. Increasing labor costs 
have maintained the price, but the world's 
stored wool must eventually find the 
market. Cessation of buying has all but 
now cured universal extravagence. The 
public must necessarily commence buy- 
ing again soon. If their confidence is 
restored business will be stabilized and 
woollen prices will decrease gradually to 
a normal level. 

Throughout the country cotton stocks 
are very low and the promise is that the 
next year will be extremely busy for 
cotton products manufacturers. For some 
months past trade in these Tues has 
been dull, has fallen flat, and while from 
eight to nine months are required to 
reflect the price of raw cottons in the 
retail market, it is most probable that 
the coming year will see increased ac- 
tivity with easy grades in price reduc- 
tion, so that there will be little loss and 
inconvenience in restoring the norma! 
state of affairs here. 

The Canadian public should buy a 
maximum of Canadian manufactured 
cottons. We already pay heavy ex- 
change discounts to the States for raw 
material. We can't afford to duplicate 
that loss by buying American manufac- 
tured goods. So litre again mainten- 



ance of stability, restoration of public 
confidence and restoration of our dollar 
all combine mutually to support each 
other. 




Newest English Wash 
Fabrics 

1. Dull blue ground with conventional de- 
sign of rose and blue and black. 2. Blue 
ground with futurist pattern of rose, yel- 
low, black and blue. 3. Dark blue ground 
with violet stripes and multi-colored motifs. 
4. White ground with large motifs of pink 
and blue. — Courtesy Hodgson, Sumner & 
Co., Montreal. 



Silks First to Go 
Silks were the first of the commodi- 
ties in the dry goods group to show the 
trend of affairs. The market went to 
pieces all over the world. Speculation, 
following enormously increased produc- 
tion for war purposes, is the cause. The 
remedy is to conservatively cultivate the 
market from both ends — that is, buy 
when you can promote production and 
sell at as low a margin as possible until 
confidence is restored. 

C. A. Bogert, president of the Can- 
adian Banking Association, speaking 
generally, laid down the following ad- 
vice, which may be applied specifically 
to the dry goods trade. He said: 

"The outlook for industry and busi- 
ness is not promising for the next few 
months, but it is altogether probable 
that by the end of 1921 a new era of 
prosperity will be in sight. 

"The doctrine of economy has been 
wisely and insistently promulgated 
throughout the country, but the time has 
arrived when people with money to spend 
should afford some encouragement and 
assistance by making reasonable pur- 
chases. This cannot be construed as ex- 
travagance — it is the only way in which 
commercial liabilities can be reduced 
and domestic tiade stimulated." 



SILKS ON HIGH ROAD TO 
RECOVERY 

Continued from page 97 

fair, but tricolettes or knitted silks are 
not strong favorites. 

A prominent silk buyer said recently 
to Dry Goods Review, speaking of silk 
fashions: 

"Seldom has any fabric been so gra- 
ciously received as Crepe de Chine. It 
promises to be worn all the Spring and 
Summer. Black is expected to be par- 
ticularly good, combined with brilliant 
color contrasts. But when in doubt 
choose taffeta, seems to be the universal 
decision." 

Much more will be heard of the new- 
est comer to silkdom, during the Spring 
months, namely the soft and lustrous 
Canton Crepe, which is both practical 
and beautiful, and which was illustrated 
some time ago in Dry Goods Review, 
along with other silk samples sent out 
by our Paris correspondent. Although 
more adapted to evening wear, the mak- 
ers will no doubt devise designs suitable 
for day wear when the weather becomes- 
warmer. 



Dry Goods Review 



99 



No Demand for Woolen Goods Yet 

Mills Have Lost One Season But Kxpect Factories Can be Kept Running Wholesalers 

Report That Big Stocks Remain Unmoved on Shelves, But Are Cheerful For the 

Future — Expect Drop of 25$ This Fall. 



CONDITIONS in the cloth trade at 
the present time are very hard to 
understand. The principal diffi- 
culty seems to be that confidence has 
been lost altogether on account of the 
quick deflation which has taken place in 
the price of goods. Prices are in many 
cases far below the real value accord- 
ing to advices from Canadian mills 
and really lower than some of the goods 
could be made for to-day. The mills are 
practically in the position of having lost 
one entire season, that is, for Spring 
goods. Merchants and makers-up did 
not order, preferring almost without ex- 
ception to use up the stock on hand. Con- 
sequently the wholesalers and jobbers 
are heavily stocked and most mills will 
now be selling out for Fall, 1921. 

No Movement Yet 

From the wholesaler's point of view 
very little can be said just yet. 

"Frankly, nothing doing at all," was 
the admission from one woolen goods 
buyer in a big Toronto house this month. 

"We are heavily stocked and our 
goods have not commenced to move yet. 
We have practically no novelties except 
in striped and checked skirtings and 
everything is in staple practical lines. 
We feel that our customers will have to 
come into the market before very long, 
for it stands to reason that the retail 
merchants' stocks must be pretty low 
by now." 

The travellers are on the road now, 
but as yet their reports are very meagre, 
if available at all. 

One large Canadian manufacturer of 
woolen coatings and dress goods asked 
as to production and prices for Fall 
declared that prices for next season 
would likely be down about 25 per cent, 
on last Fall's prices. In the opinion of 
one mill owner, those manufacturers 
with a large range of goods on hand 
should be able to pick up some very 
good business, and so be able to keep 
the factories running, for it is stated 
that while there are very big stocks in 
the country they are made up principally 
of very ordinary goods and it looks as 
though merchants will have to buy to 
some extent in order to make their pre- 
sent stocks attractive. 

The Fall Range 

One big mill in Canada is working on 
a splendid range of both light and heavy 
velours. The heavy weight goods will be 
offered in an excellent range of staple 
shades including navys, greys, browns, 
and black, while a very fine range in 
novelty shades will be available in the 



lighter weight velours. Tricotine in a 
full range of shades will also be offered 
and an excellent demand is anticipated 
for light weight serges. 

At the present time it looks as though 
the chief demands for Spring will centre 
in tricotines and serges in navy and 
black. The manufacturers of women's 
suits and coats are offering their sam- 
ples in the reliable navy, and it is ex- 
pected that owing to the precarious state 
of the market risks will be avoided as 
far as possible and reliable, practical 
shades called for in place of too many 
novelties. If things brighten up any- 
thing like as quickly in the cloth market 
however, as they have in the silk mar- 
ket, manufacturers of woolen goods can 
hope for brighter days before many 
months pass, and even now there is an 
indication of a wider range of novelty 
cloths being called for. 

Colors in Sports Woolens 

For novelty sports cloths the Ameri- 
can color card, described in Dry Goods 
Review some time ago, includes a very 
excellent range of pretty shades which 
if not universally adopted will at least 
have a very strong appeal for the mak- 
ers of lines for the exclusive trade. 

A red, similar to cherry, is known in 
woolens as Jockey. Paddock is a deep 
rich green, Marathon a bright gold 
which has been much in vogue at the 
Winter resorts, and Olympic promises to 
be one of the prettiest bluish greens. 

Mastic and sponge are two distinctly 
smart tan shades. Agate is a reddish 
rust tone; Sphinx a light brown already 
well known. Two other fascinating 
blues of greenish tone are Pagoda and 
Nippon. Browns, true greys and navy, 
however, will be the leaders this Spring- 
apart from the ever distinctive black 
which France continues to place first at 
all seasons. 

The materials seen at the wholesale 
houses during the past month have in- 
cluded a very complete range in staple 
shades and cloths and one leading house 
features a very fine collection of wor- 
sted checks in serviceable dark shades 
that will sell at practically all seasons 
for "knock about" skirts or for sports 
wear. The plaids are in both regular 
and broken effects in dark green or navy, 
i-reen on brown, navy on purple, tan 
on grey, etc. The checks are large and 
fairly subdued as to color combination. 
They will lend themselves to the popular 
cut in sports skirts and some would be 
quite serviceable for whole suit cos- 
tumes. 

"We have a very heavy stock on hand, 



twice as large as we had this time last 
year," said one woolen goods buyer to 
Dry Goods Review recently. "There is 
no use avoiding the facts. We have all 
we can carry and until the goods start 
moving off we cannot possibly place any 
more orders with the mills until we get 
some ordeis from our own customers." 

Asked as to their customers' attitude 
this buyer said: "We are getting prac- 
tically no business at all at present, 
therefore we cannot afford to place 
another order but we fully expect that 
things will brighten in the woolen goods 
market before very long and then we 
will be able to talk styles in materials, 
something that we have not dared to 
think of for months." 

In the meantime the retailers' stocks 
are unquestionably dwindling for from 
all sides come reports of good business 
and with the knowledge that there is 
plenty of good material available from 
which to choose, the merchant will in all 
probability commence placing orders 
without much more delay. 



Actor's Wife 

Auctions Coat 

For Charity 

During the recent visit of the noted 
English actor, Sir Martin Harvey, to 
Montreal, an interesting event too place 
in the St. Catherine St. store of A. J. 
Alexander Limited, the firm of furriers, 
when Lady Harvey auctioned off a re- 
markably fine Hudson seal coat which 
had been donated by the firm in aid of 
Lady Harvey's home for needy women in 
England. The event was one of great 
interest in all circles, both theatrical 
and social, and the handsome showrooms 
of the Alexander store were thronged 
with interested bidders. The coat was 
auctioned off by Lady Harvey from a 
dais draped with the Union Jack, while 
her daughter, Miss Muriel Martin Har- 
vey posed in the coat during the 
bidding. Moving picture cameras were 
busily at work during the event and 
there was much applause when the coat 
was knocked down to the highest bidder 
for $255. 

Lady Harvey expressed her apprecia- 
tion of the interest taken in the relief 
fund in Montreal and thanked the firm 
and the purchaser of the coat in a 
charmingly worded speech before leaving* 
the store. 






DRESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 



Why Wool Prices Show 

a Fourfold Increase 

Process of Converting Raw Wool Into Finished Product Most 

Expensive — Many Stages of Expert Handling Required — 

Prices Still 200 ( < Above 1914 Figures. 



IN Winnipeg three farmers were talk- 
ing in front of a store window. Said 
one: "What do you think about 
that for profiteering? I went into 
this store here to get a 10-pound woolen 
robe and the robbers wanted $25 for it, 
and I can only get 20 cents for my wool 
to-day." 

Most likely the wool in that robe was 
originally bought from the farmer at 
about 60 cents but that is only half 
the story, and here is some information 
that each merchant and each clerk 
should have to pass along to the customer 
who is demanding bargains in wool lines. 

It takes two and a half pounds of un- 
washed wool to make one pound of 
washed wool. The pound and a half 
that is lost represents oil, grease and 
dirt. The process by which these are 
renewed requires high priced labor. 
Then it is necessary to sort the wool 
into several grades, depending on the 
fineness of the wool, and the length of 
it. These grades range from shoddy, 
which commands, of course, the lowest 
figure, to the "Botany" if the wool pro- 
duces any of this fine grade. The 
amount of fine wool produced is a small 
percentage of the total weight. This 
process again involves considerable high 
priced labor. 

Toppings 

The next step is the "topping," where 
the various grades are twisted into 
cones approximately a pound and a half 
each ready to go into the spinning mach- 
ines. This operation, of course, again 
calls for high priced labor. For the pur- 
poses to which the various grades are 
suitable, these "tops" are put into the 



spinning machines, and from a strand as 
large as your wrist, they are reduced, 
through various machines to the variety 
of yarns that the various purposes re- 
quire. Labor costs again enter as a 
factor here. 

Dyeing 

After the wool has been spun to the 
yarn required, the next process is dye- 
ing. At the present time, the average 
cost of dyeing wool, as quoted by British 
dye houses, is said to be about 30 cents 
per pound. In the process of dyeing- 
there is a loss in weight of 6 per cent. 

To summarize then, 250 pounds of 
wool, as taken from the sheep, shrink 
in the various processes to 94 pounds of 
dyed yarn. We have seen how a great 
deal of high priced labor has been ex- 
pended on it, and machines costing thou- 
sands of dollars employed. We can now 
understand why the farmer can get 60 
cents for his wool, and the knitter pay 
three-fifty a pound for his yarn, and 
still no one be "cleaning-up" the differ- 
ence. 

For the garments to be delivered this 
Spring, the wool is all bought and paid 
for. No matter how panicky a raw wool 
merchant might get, or how hard-press- 
ed a yarn operator might become, his 
prices to-day could not make a differ- 
ence to this Spring's manufactured pric- 
es unless some one was taking a licking. 
As soon as each merchant or manufac- 
turer has "taken his loss" to the extent 
necessary to realize the money he ur- 
gently needs, he will either get his cost 
plus a profit, on what further merchan- 
dise he sells, or he will refuse to do 
further business. 




The cost of yarn now, at primary mar- 
kets (yarn which will be available for 
next Fall's merchandise, but not this 
Spring's) is as low as most experts fig- 
ure will cover the present cost of pro- 
duction; and to-day's prices are still two 
hundred per cent higher than the 1914 
levels. The wool going into next Fall's 
garments will be lower priced than at 
present being used, but will not, and can- 
not approach .the 1914 levels, by 50 per 
cent, by reason of the higher labor costs 
at every point in production. 



PARIS SCHEDULES FEBRUARY 
OPENINGS 

Paris, Jan. 6. — Several further 
announcements have been made of 
the dates upon which members of 
the haute couture will hold their 
initial displays of the Spring, 1921, 
collections now in progress. 

Beer, and Madeleine et Made- 
leine have announced Feb. 7 for 
their opening, Lelong the fourth 
of the same month, Martial et Ar- 
mand the fourth or fifth. The 
Worth opening is planned for the 
first week in February also, while 
Drecoll announces that the collec- 
tion will be viewed about the tenth. 



INSURE EMPLOYEES 

Ottawa, Ont.— President S. L. T. Mor- 
rell, of the Murphy-Gamble Co., Limit- 
ed, Sparks Street, had a pleasant duty 
to perform at the close of the year 1920 
when he notified the members of the 
staff to the number of about 175 that 
they had been insured for amounts of 
from $500 to $2,000, according to the 
length of their service with the firm. 
Six months' service was rewarded with 
a policy valued at $500, while a twelve- 
month completed meant a policy for $600. 
For each year of service $100 per an- 
num will be added for five years and 
then $200 per annum until the full $2,000 
is reached. Several with the 11 years 
already to their credit received the free 
insurance for the full amount. 

In a neat little speech to the employees, 
Mr. Morrell told of the late Mr. Ham- 
mill's desire for the plan and how hard 
he worked to perfect the plan to suit 
the needs of all. The main idea was 
to forge stronger the link that bound 
the employers and employees together, 
and it was the determination of the new 
directors to see that the staff should be 
helped in any necessary way that the 
future may reveal advisable so that a 
real spirit of co-operation will prevail. 



Plaids and Stripes Are Good 

( heik). and stripes are to be prominently featured in smart Spring costumes. 
For all sorts of practical service these worsteds will be used. The designs shown 
introduce a new plaid and a large check. 



TO SPEED UP BUSINESS 

The- Murphy-Gamble Company, Limit- 
ed, of Ottawa, advertised a "New Man- 
agement Sale" which was begun a few 
days before the New Year. Prices will 
be most favourable to the purchasers 
and a great effort made to surpass all 
selling records is the goal aimed at by- 
all the staff. 



Unj Goods Review 



101 



Looking for Gradual Return to Normal 

General Impression is That the Cotton and Woolen Industries Have Reached Worst Stage- 
Improvement is Looked for Shortly — Woolens and Worsteds Federation Will Resort 
to Black List to Prevent Further Cancellations. 



THE officer in charge of the De- 
partment of Overseas Trade in 
Toronto has furnished the follow- 
ing exclusive statement to Dry Goods 
Review, based on recent reports from the 
head office in London and dealing with 
the prevailing market conditions in cot- 
ton* and woolens: 

Cottons 

The movements of raw cotton prices 
have undoubtedly assisted the mainte- 
nance of the depression during the past 
month. Following upon the selling or- 
ders, which the coal strike induced, there 
were some indications of improvement, 
but these were probably merely the re- 
action from overselling during the strike 
period. Whatever the cause, the slight 
revival was short-lived, and present con- 
ditions are much as they were a month 
ago. 

The decline in the prices for the raw 
material has further unsettled the trade, 
and, up to the present, demand continues 
hesitant at the present level. It is true 
that a fairly considerable number of en- 
quiries are received for certain grades of 
yarns, but these are generally made at 
too low a level for sellers to consider. 
Many of these enquiries emanate from 
India, and although the above applies to 
most of these, where dhooties are con- 
cerned the position is rather better, and 
reports from Blackburn indicate a fair 
improvement in this branch of the trade. 

While there may be no material indi- 
cation that such is the case, the opinion 
in this industry, as in others, appears to 
be gaining ground that the depression 
has about reached its worst, and that in 
the near future a gi'adual return to more 
normal conditions will set in. 

The question of organized short time 
in the American section has again been 
postponed (see Bulletin No. 6. Vol. II, 
pp. 230-2), but it is stated that the Gen- 
eral Committee of the Cotton Spinners' 
Federation will be asked at an early 
meeting to arrange for another ballot 
upon this question. It has, in the mean- 
time been decided to continue the Satur- 
day and Monday stoppage in the Egyp- 
tian mills until, at least, the middle of 
this month. 

Cancellations 

With regard to the cancellation of 
goods on order, the Manchester Chamber 
of Commerce has called a special meet- 
ing, and the following is an extract from 
their journal: 

"The fall in yarn and cloth prices 
brought more requests for cancella- 
tion of contracts, this time specially 



from a section of the American firms 
who have bought in Manchester. The 
Chamber called a meeting of those 
interested and it was unanimously 
decided then that no cancellations 
should be agreed to in cases where 
the terms of the contract had been 
kept on this side. Traders in Amer- 
ica were urged to recognize the sanc- 
tity of contracts and to take every 
possible step to induce the default- 
ers to shoulder their responsibility. 
The American consul in Manchester 
(Mr. Holaday) afterwards informed 
the president that the consular offi- 
cials of his country had facilities for 
dealing with trade misunderstand- 
ings, and that he would be willing 
to assist in 'his matter. It is pro- 
posed, accordingly, that those con- 
cerned should avail themselves of 
Mr. Holaday's valuable help." 

The Legislative Council of the United 
Factory Workers Association is consid- 
ering the question of hours in the cotton 
industry, and there is a party in the As- 
sociation which desires a 44-hour week, 
instead of the present 48. The existing 
arrangement is terminable at the end of 
the year at the request of either side, but, 
although there is no chance of an in- 
crease in the working hours, a reduction 
would be surprising. 

It is reported that Oldham is installing 
half a million spindles, apart from re- 
newals, and the spinning trade has a 
reasonable confidence in its future. 

Important Meeting 

The Committee of the International 
Federation of Master Cotton Spinners 
and Manufacturers' Association has just 
held a meeting. Owing to indisposition 
of the President (Sir A. H. Dixon) Mr. 
John Syz (Switzerland) presided. There 
were present Count Jean de Hemptinue 
(Belgium), Commandatore G. Mylius 
(Italy), Henri Manuel (France), Joan 
Geldaerman (Holland), John Smethurst 
and F. A. Hargreaves (England), C. 
Bergh (Sweden), T. Kachi (Japan), Dr. 
Zucker (Czecho-Slovakia) and Arno S. 
Pearse, general secretary, and John Pog- 
son, assistant secretary. 

Extensive reports were presented by 
the individual members of the Committee 
on the state of trade in the various coun- 
tries, from which it was seen that the 
depression in industry is world-wide and 
that short time, organized and individual, 
is being extensively adopted. 

Final arrangements were arrived at 
with regard to the delegation of cotton 
representatives to the cotton-growing 
districts of Brazil, in response to an invi- 



tation extended by the Brazilian Govern- 
ment. The party is due to leave next 
March. It is expected that five months 
will be required for the purpose of the 
investigation. 

The committee congratulated the Eng- 
lish delegates on the steps that are being- 
taken in England for the raising of a 
levy for fostering cotton-growing in the 
British Empire, as it is fully recognized 
that cotton must be grown wherever it 
can be grown on a commercial basis. 

Many other subjects of an administra- 
tive character were dealt with. Sugges- 
tions connected with the holding of the 
World Cotton Conference in Manchester 
and Liverpool next June were placed be 
fore the committee, and "as the chairman 
of the International Cotton Federation is 
also chairman of the World's Cotton 
Conference, it is hoped that steps will be 
taken to enable the International Feder- 
ation to be largely represented. 

Progress was reported regarding the 
appointment of arbitrators for dealing 
with disputes arising out of yarn and 
cloth contracts entered into between 
traders in the various countries affiliated 
to the International Federation. It was 
stated that many such arbitrations have 
taken place, and that the disputes have 
been satisfactorily settled. 

Woolens 

Dealing with the woolen situation, the 
report states: 

The general situation in this industry 
remains with little material change. 
Business continues slow and is generally 
confined to transactions for the purpose 
of filling immediate requirements. Busi- 
ness remains much as it was last month, 
scarcely sufficient to provide a real test 
of current prices. At the postponed auc- 
tions (Bulletin No. 6, Vol. II, p. 232) 
trading was distinctly disappointing, 
prices being weak and heavy quantities 
withdrawn. 

There is little doubt that buyers prac- 
tically the world over are holding off 
pending future price developments, and 
this lack of demand is accentuated by 
the normal tendency to quietness which 
exists at this period of the year. 

Short time working is still adopted by 
the majority of worsted spinners, al- 
though a number are running full time 
in order to fulfill existing contracts. 

When cancellations began to trouble 
the trade on a scale never formerly 
known, and the West Riding was snowed 
under with "scraps of paper," there was 
much talk of countering the tactics of 
manufacturers' customers who repudi- 
Continued on next page 






DRESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 



Alphonse Racine 
Hold Banquet 
At National Club 

The first annual convention of trav- 
ellers ami buyers of the house of Al- 
phonse Racine, Ltd., manufacturers and 
wholesale distiibutoi-s of dry goods, was 
held during the past week and terminated 
with a banquet at the National Club. 

The convention was an entire success 
from beginning to end, and the informa- 
tion, acquaintanceship and splendid 
house-spirit that developed, realized the 
ultimate of expectations indulged in by 
this house in inaugurating - this idea of 
gettii _ " . ther. 

The chairman was Mr. Norman Paulet, 
who handled the meeting in a splendid 
manner. The incoming chairman of the 
convention for 1921, Mr. D. R. Campbell, 
director, presided at the banquet, in 
which jiearly one hundred of the staff 
and officer? of the company participated. 
At the table of honor were the president, 
Alphonse Racine; the vice-president, 
Hector H. Racine; Yvon Dupre and P. E. 
Bissonnette. directors; Paul Mariot, sec- 
retary: N. Paulet, merchandise manager; 
J. B. Barrette, superintendent; J. L. 
Coutlee, credit manager; L. E. Charron, 
prefect of the county of St. Hyacinthe, 
manufacturer and traveller for the com- 
pany; ar.d F. J. Murphy, representative 
in the province of Nova Scotia. 

After the toast to "Our King and 
Country ' was sung, the toast to "Our 
Firm"' was proposed by N. Paulet, who 
gave a brief history of the company, 
which was founded in 1878 by the late 
Hon. Alphonse Racine. The president 
and vice-president responded to this 
toast. To "Our Buyers" was coupled the 
names of J. M. 0. Gagnon and James 
Mitchell. "Oui Travellers" was re- 
plied • P. E. Bissonnette, of Ottawa, 
L. E. Charron, St. Denis, F. J. Murphy, 
Sydney. C.B., G. F. Adamson, Ottawa, 
and E. A. Lapierre, Sudbury. 

imunity singing of popular and 
folk Bonga in French and English and a 
programme of solos, monologues, etc., 
was given at intervajs during the ban- 
quet. The splendid talent was entirely 
from among the staff, and among the 
artists were Messrs. Lavoie, Rochon, 
Robitaille, Bissett, Rochette, Thibaudeau 
and Heroux. 

The banquet came to a close with 
rom visitors, who came in at 
a late hour — a well-known business man 
and a well-known professional man — a. 
•I. Dugal, managing director of Dupuis 
Frere^. and Dr. A. L. Guertin. 




/<a>- ^* w «*• 






quarters, overseas buyers will no doubt 
be interested to learn that such an inno- 
vation is, in fact, coming into being. 

Resort to a Black List 

The Woolen and Worsted Trades Fed- 
eration, which comprises no fewer than 
twenty-one organizations in the two 
branches of the wool textile industry, and 
the individual firms composing which 
have suffered severely as the result of 
the recent wholesale repudiation of con- 
tracts, has at length decided that nothing 
but a black list will meet the unprece- 
dented situation. It intends to proceed 
at once to institute what, it is believed, 
will prove an effective instrument in pre- 
venting unjustifiable cancellations. 

It should be explained that this drastic 
procedure will be employed with discrim- 
ination, and that where circumstances 
warrant consideration in favor of the 
customer, he will obtain the full benefit 
of them, but a vigorous policy is to be 
adopted towards buyers, concerning 
whom it is felt that they are placing or- 
ders with the predetermined intention of 
repudiating the contract should the mar- 
ket move against them in the meantime. 

Mr. George H. Wood, the secretary of 
the Federation, states: "We have defi- 
nitely resolved to 'black list' people who 
act contrary to commercial morality. 
Further, where cancellations are unfair 
and contrary to law, we are going to ad- 
vise our members to take legal proceed- 
ings, and, for the best legal advice the 
Federation can find, its financial support 
will be behind any member involved. 
The Woolen and Worsted Trades Feder- 
ation represents from 80 to 90 per cent, 
of the production of the industry, so that 
the one black-list should be effective." 
The remedy comes somewhat late in the 
day when much of the damage done is 
irreparable, but it is to be hoped that it 
will lead to a material reduction in the 
number of cancellations in the future. 



Variety in Voiles 

Six charming designs in cotton and silk 
voiles, revealing floral, conventional and 
geometric designs in combinations of blue 
with beauty and grey; taupe with brown, 
yellow and royal; taupe with plum, tur- 
quoise and henna. The second and fifth 
samples from the top are from the lines of 
\V. R. Brock, Montreal. The other designs 
shown are being offered by the Sterling 
Lace & Novelty Co., Ltd., Toronto. 



LOOKING FOR GRADUAL RETURN 

Continued from page 101 

ated their obligations by establishing a 
"black list," but, probably, beyond the 
limits of the wool textile industry, the 
threatened measure of defence was not 
regarded very seriously. Although, 
however, it was thus regarded in many 



H, 



P. Ritchie and Co. 
Hold Annual Dance 



Social Affair Becomes Annual Institution 

— Heads of Firm Act as Hosts and 

Officiate on Committee. 

A delightful dance followed by a sup- 
per and more dancing was the splendid 
entertainment given by H. P. Ritchie and 
Company to their employees and a few 
business friends on Jan. 6th. Through 
Mr. Ritchie's generosity this is an an- 
nual affair and greatly looked forward to 
by the staff. 

The examining department was taste- 
fully decorated by the commitee, Messrs. 
H. P. Ritchie, C. A. Cummings, A. C. 
Legard, B. Devins, A. McLeod, J. Kirk- 
wood and J. Neilson. Messrs. Bodley 
and Cole supplied the music and refresh- 
ments. 



Dry Go ids Revv i 



DRESS FABRICS 



L03 




H»4 



DRESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods- Review 



Qfie Seal of {Distinction 






The Value of a Label 

It is the maker's identification — an assurance 
of fabric value. 

The Shelton Looms label in a garment assures 
you and your customers that it is the genuine — a 
protection against inferior imitations — an 
accepted sign of fabric quality in Woven furs. 

The importance of The Shelton Looms label 
is emphasized in our national advertising in 
women's publications and the rotogravure sec- 
tions of Sunday newspapers. 

The significance of this identification mark is 
appreciated by America's leading garment man- 
ufacturers — they use Shelton Looms labels in 
garments made of these superior fabrics. 

Insist that garments made of Woven Fur 
Fabrics bear this "mark of distinction" — The 
Shelton Looms label. 




SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL & CO. Inc. 

395 Fourth Avenue . New York N.Y. 



Dry <>'<>ods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



105 



What will appeal to the ladies? 
We have it ! 



5K 



\i$ 




Crepes de Chine 

Georgettes 

Chiffons 

Ninons 

Satins 

Printed Silks 

Silk Shirtings 

Plain and fancy 

Cotton Novelties 



It's World Wide 

Our reputation for the finest of the fine ! 

Wherever the most exquisite effects and superb 
qualities are sought, our lines prove worthy to stand 
in the front ranks. You can offer them to your 
discriminating clientele with complete confidence 
that they will give the desired effect and satisfaction. 

PLACE NOW 
and protect yourself against shortage. 

We carry at all times a well - assorted stock 
in Crepes de Chine, Georgettes, Satins, Shirtings, 
Printed Silks, Chiffons, Ninons. 



Les Successeurs de 



Albert Godde, Bedin & Cie 




PARIS TARARE LYONS 

LONDON NEW YORK 

EMPIRE BUILDING, 64 WELLINGTON STREET WEST 

Telephone : Adelaide 3062 

TORONTO 

E. Desnoux, Rep. 

Western Canada Agent: Edwin J. Kirkbright, 205 Bower Bldg. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



lllli 



D R ESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods 




FLEUR-DE-LYS 

SEWING SILKS 

are filling the need for sewing silks of 
quality, fast color and permanency, for 
they neither fray nor break. 

We keep pace with the times in having 
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Have you lost sales from lack of variety? 
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MONTREAL 



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FRANK & BRYCE Limited 

Toronto MONTREAL quebec | 

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I) I{ V (iOODS REV] E W 



107 




Desparois Garneau 
Coon Coats 




$ 1 50.22 



up 



We carry the largest assortment of 
Coon Coats, on the racks, in Canada 



Desparois, Garneau & Cie, Limitee 
FURRIERS 

465 St. Paul St. West 
Montreal 



IOS 



Dry Goods Review 



Anticipate Higher Fur Prices Soon 

R S. Coltart of Candian Fur Auction Sales Co., Explains Outlook for Spring — Auctions 
Will Have Effect Upon Business — Wholesalers Tempting Buyers With Compara- 
tive Price Quotations — Market Expected to Firm Up Before Long — Best 

Time to Buy Now. 



THE situation in furs has not im- 
proved materially since the New 
Year began. Sacrifice sales in both 
retail and wholesale houses continue to 
occupy the attention of buyers who are 
undoubtedly looking for bargains in the 
widest sense of the word. Manufacturers 
are advertising the fact that retail prices 
of manufactured furs have reached their 
lowest level, and are likely to increase 
in the near future. According to R. S. 
Coltart, vice-president and managing 
director of the Canadian Fur Auction 
Sales Co., Ltd., the public have been led 
to expect a decline in the retail price of 
manufactured furs, on account of the 
decline in raw furs, which misrepresents 
the present situation entirely. "The 
original value of the raw skins alone is 
only a proportion of the total cost of 
the finished product," stated Mr. Coltart. 
"Raw skins have to be dressed and often 
dyed, and then manufactured. The cost 
of these three processes is on the in- 
crease, together with the cost of all ac- 
cessories. 

"The reduction in the retail price to 
which the public is entitled on account of 
the decline in the cost of the raw furs 
has been more than taken care of by the 
retailer. However, price declines have not 
come as suddenly in the retail fur indus- 
try as in the raw fur trade. The move- 
ment towards lower prices has been in 
progress since last March or April. 

"The very late season caused retailers 
to cut prices from what were considered 
by the trade as fair values, and prices 
are now at the lowest point that can be 
expected for some time. The demand for 
fine furs will be greater as the season ad- 
vances and prices will be correspondingly 
higher." 

Auction Will Have Cood Effect 

According to prominent Montreal 
wholesalers in the fur business it is an- 
ticipated that the coming auction will 
stabilize conditions to a marked extent. 
The coming three months will probably 
be quiet ones in the industry since the 
busiest time of normal seasons has come 
and gone and even though a sudden re- 
awakening of interest in furs should 
come to pass, weather conditions would 
militate against favorable business con- 
ditions. It is not anticipated that many 




Ideal For Early Spring 

A charming velvet cape which owes con- 
siderable of its charm to the narrow bands 
of squirrel which choose to follow its cir- 
cular course on three occasions. The same 
fur draped provides a cosy and becoming 
collar. 



furs will be worn next summer in Can- 
ada although in the United States the 
habit of wearing summer furs is estab- 
lished as a custom in all parts of the 
country. Canadian representatives of 
fur manufacturers have not as yet gone 
out on the road with next season's 
samples as it is not thought that the 
retailers are yet ready to place orders, 



and in consequence it would not be worth 
while to send travelers out until more 
interest becomes manifest in this line. 
Prices as quoted by the manufacturers 
and wholesalers will not be revised any 
more this season and it has been stated 
by the foremost fur makers that it is un- 
questionably the time to place orders 
now while operatives and finishers are 
slack and anxious to work the normal 
time. The present tendency to delay 
placing orders in furs by retailers will 
doubtless have an unpleasant effect in 
this regard later on, as manufacturers 
state that overtime work is not regarded 
favorably by the workers during the 
warm weather and consequently a short- 
age is bound to occur if all orders are 
indefinitely postponed until the very last 
moment. Deliveries for 1921 are ex- 
tremely problematical from present con- 
ditions unless orders begin to come in 
before very long. Furthermore, prices 
quoted now will be decidedly lower than 
those which will be in order when a sud- 
den demand comes from all over Canada 
at once. 

In the United States it is stated that 
the resistance of the trappers to the low 
prices offered for new skins has had 
some effect on the fur market since the 
second price lists sent out by firms in St. 
Louis and New York are quoting prices 
higher than previously. The Inter- 
national Fur Exchange has sent out an 
admonition to trappers throughout the 
world to stop trapping in an effort to 
check the declining values of raw pelts. 
As is known to the trade at large the 
coming auction in the United States, 
under the auspices of the International 
Exchange of St. Louis, will witness the 
assembling of perhaps the largest col- 
lection of raw and dressed furs the trade 
has ever known. This collection, with 
a value estimated to be about $15,000,000 
at the present time, is thought to re- 
present the entire Funsten holdings in 
furs. Its value a year ago when most 
of it is believed to have been accum- 
ulated, would have been $40,000,000 or 
more, according to market authorities. 
The total offering by far exceeds that of 
February, 1920, when Funsten Bros. & 
Co., realized more than $27,000,000 
through the sales of merchandise put up 
for auction at that time. 

The largest individual item are musk- 
rats, of which 1,234,000 are to be offered; 
squirrel, with 2,110,000 in the collection, 
and mole, with 2,625,000 skins. There is 
sufficient merchandise of almost every 
type in the collection to explain to the 



Dm Good^s Review 



FUR DEPARTMENT 



KM) 



satisfaction of fur men the "no-trapping" 
campaign which Funsten Bros. & Co. 
have been conducting. It is generally 
anticipated that only a small part of the 
total collection will be sold. 

The Funsten sale will be preceded 
directly by auctions held by the New 
York Fur Auction Sales Corporation and 
the Canadian Fur Auction Sales Co., of 
Montreal. The total value of collections 
to be sold by these two organizations is 
not expected to exceed $5,000,000. At 
the same time that these sales are in 
progress, fur auctions will also be con- 
ducted by the large London companies. 
It is expected that while every effort 
will be made to sell as large a part of 
the offering as possible, ample support 
will be given to the market to prevent 
any unwarrented slump in prices, or 
slaughter of merchandise. Prices ap- 
proximating the intrinsic value of the 
Belts are anticipated and no likelihood 
of the fur being given away is feared. 
Some indication of the probable trend 
of prices in the coming Montreal auction, 
to be held at the end of January will be 
afforded by the New York sale on Jan- 
uary 17th. 

Comparative Prices 

Montreal wholesale firms are adver- 
tising comparative prices at the present 
time to illustrate clearly to the buying 
public the enormous advantage of pur- 
chasing now. One firm prints a table 
showing at a glance the tremendous dif- 
ference existing in values as asked last 
March with present January prices, as 
follows: 

Fair Our 
Retail Wholesale 
Values Price 
in March To-day- 
Hudson Sea] SI, 000 $400 

French Seal 500 175 

Muskrat 500 200 

Raccoon 850 350 

Russian Pony 400 140 

Hair Seal 250 150 

Australian Raccoon (selected). 350 150 

Another wholesale house is offering a 
quantity of its dressed pelts in the raw 
state to the public at remarkable reduc- 
tions' as follows : 

SKINS 

Taupe skins, very good quality $0.25 

White Hare, extra good quality large skins 1.00 

French Seal "Chapel dyed," large range from 1.75 
Australian Opossum, extra quality, silver 

grey, large quantities to be sold 3.00 

Australian Opossum No. 1, also grey silver 2.00 

Australian Opossum, No. 2 1.50 

Alaska Sable, extra selection . . 4 '. 00 

Persian Lamb, our specialty, fine quality 

and great choice at 10 00 

Natural Otter of Labrador at 35 00 

Conditions 

Many firms realize that prices had to 
come down and that profits at the best, 
must be cut considerably and a loss 
taken. Despite this, it is contended that 
the public has carried some proportion 
of the losses consequent upon recon- 
struction, having made the high price 
itself when money was more free. 
Unless profits are cut, the whole trade 




will suffer considerably and many of the 
weaker firms go to the wall, with much 
unemployment resulting. 'However, 
members of the trade are now more op- 
timistic and express confidence that the 
fur business will emerge triumphant 
soon from its recent trials. Bank pres- 



sure, it is claimed, has not been without 
its effect and has entailed a certain 
amount of forced sale and an additional 
amount of price cutting. Firms adver- 
tising reductions as high as fifty per 
cent, are not altogether in favor with 
their competitors, who allege that they 
have merely taken the sum of the various 
reductions of five, ten, and fifteen per 
cent, of past months and added them to- 
gether. This, they claim, may eventually 
harm the advertisers, as it tends to give 
the public the impression that the bot- 
tom has dropped out of the market and 
will cause them to await still further 
drops. 



Canadian Fur Auction Sale to 

Be Held at Windsor Hall 

List of Offerings Announced — Skins to be on Display Two 

Days in Advance of Opening Date, January 29th — 

Reservations Made for 500 Buyers. 

The list of offerings for the annual auction of the Canadian Fur Auction 
Sales Company was issued during the week of January 10. The auction is 
scheduled to take place at Windsor Hall on January 31 and succeeding days, 
but the skins will all be on display at the company's warehouse from 9 a.m. 
on the 27th of January, on which date also the official catalogue will be 
issued. 

Owing to the enormous variety of pelts exhibited, unusual care is beinp 
taken to ensure the perfect condition of each and every lot offered for sale. 
It has been arranged that the sample or show bundle shown at the auction 
shall be inferior to the bulk which it represents, in order that no disappoint- 
ment shall be felt by purchasers. 

The method of grading adopted by the London Fur Sales will be closely 
adhered to and the opinion has been freely expressed by those in closest 
touch with the fur market that the auction will undoubtedly have the effect 
of standardizing prices and stabilizing this market in Canada. 

Reservations have been made in the hall for some 500 buyers, but the 
general public will be admitted as far as accommodation will permit. Bulle- 
tins will be posted at the close of each day's bidding, with statements of the 
proceedings detailed thereon. 

The skins offered are as follows: 



650 


Badger 


300 


Bear 


5,000 


Beaver 


35,000 


Ermine 


500 


Fisher 


32 


Blue Fox 


50 


Cross Fox 


3,500 


Red Fox 


350 


Silver Fox 


1,100 


White Fox 


350 


Lynx 


3,600 


Marten 


15,000 


Mink 


200,000 


Muskrat 


68 


Musk Ox 


5,000 


Opossum 


400 


Otter 


20,000 


Raccoon 


25,000 


Skunk 


5,000 


Wolf 



37 


Wolverine 


3,300 


Australian Fox 


27,000 


Australian Opossum 


30,000 


Ringtail Opossum 


11,000 


Dogmats 


750 


Fitch 


2,500 


Kangaroo 


200 


Krimmer 


20,000 


Kolinsky 


12,000 


Persian Lamb 


5,000 


Shira 


40,000 


Marmot 


20,000 


Mole 


91 


Russian Sable 


1,225 


Hair Seal 


111 


Dressed and Dyed Seal 


45,000 


Squirrel 


1,000 


Sundry Fox 


1,200 


Wallaby 


1,250 


Wombat 



Also sundries consisting of 5 Buffalo Robes, 1,499 Conevs, 6 Mounted 
Heads, 1 Polar Bear, 200 Thibet Lamb Robes. 



1 1 *» 



F U R D E P A R T MENT 



Dry Goods Review 



Good Advice From Regina 

'Minimize Stocks and Keep Your Head Up," Says President of 



Large Western Store 



THAT the slogan of "business as 
usual," which the trade in general 
adopted during 1915 and 1919, 
should be again emphasised for 1921, 
is the opinion of Mr. R. H. Williams, pre- 
sident of the R. H. Williams Co., of Re- 
gina. In other words, a healthy spirit 
of optimism should prevail for this 
new year, despite the "blue ruin" which 
the man on the street is beginning to 
fear as a result of some sensational 
headlines in the popular press. 

"Nevertheless, we must come to a level 
sooner or later and the sooner the bet- 
ter now,' said Mr. Williams to a Dry 
Goods Review representative. "The dry 
goods trad? has prospered during the 
recent years of rising markets and it 
must expect to suffer losses to a greater 
or less extent during the readjustment 
period. This time of declining prices 
has been expected and was inevitable 
and merchants should be prepared for 
it. Naturally, everyone is trying to un- 
load stocks and the sooner that is done. 
the better. It is also essential that 
stocks be kept as low as possible until 
conditions become stabilized. This 
means that the utmost care must be ex- 
ercised in selecting and buying stocks." 
"As to offering any estimate of what 
is liable to take place during the early 
months of the new year, it is very dif- 
ficult, more so, in fact, than at any time 
since the even tenor of business was 
so rudely interrupted by the war. Farm- 
ers and other producers cannot pay the 
prices demanded this last year for labor, 
equipment, marketing their yields, etc., 
with the prices of produce going down 
and at least so far as Western Canada 
is concerned the finances of the farmer 
are of prime importance. The main 
difficulty, however, will be in getting 
labor adjusted to the new levels. But 
there is no doubt about it, labor must 
conform." 

Mr. Williams pointed out that there 
are more men and women seeking em- 
ployment — and at any price — than his 
store has experienced for years. This 
is partly due to factories and large con- 
cerns curtailing their help just as much 
as possible. In the case of farmers, 
many who have spent the past few win- 
ters in the south, are remaining at home 
this year and dispensing with hired help. 
All this is bound to reduce the price of 
labor generally. 

Labor, of course, is fairly well able to 
meet the change. Furthermore, record 
crops and record bank deposits do not. 
bespeak of blue ruin. Pessimism should 
not have a place among Canadian mer- 
chants, but a sane estimate of local, na- 
tional and international conditions should 
be the guide to steady turnover and a 



minimum of losses until the day of sta- 
bilized markets which we have all 
been hoping for, is once move with us. 
These are the views of the president of 
one of Saskatchewan's best known and 
most successful department stores. The 
R. H. Williams Co. is just now enter- 
ing upon the fortieth year of its his- 
tory. 



Finance Minister 
Reports Excellent 
Trade Outlook 

Sir Henry Drayton, Minister of Fin- 
ance, who, as chairman of the tariff com- 
mission, has just concluded investiga- 
tions which gave him exceptional facili- 
ties for sizing up the business situation 
today, has made the following optimistic 
pronouncement on the outlook for 1921: 

"The year ought to be one of good 
business and improved conditions. Buy 
ing is always slow in a dropping market, 
but, at least in some commodities of im- 
portance, the drop which has taken place 
is such that only bare cost of production 
is covered. It will soon be realized that 
prices of commodities will go no lower 
and the buying demand, which was so 
suddenly stopped owing to the realiza 1 
tion that prices were abnormally high 
and must drop, will establish itself in 
view of the prevailing lower price con- 
ditions. 

"The country's financial situation is 
good. It has materially improved. 
Statements of our chartered banks show 
Carada's banking position to be enviable. 
The great underlying essential to proper 
production — the existence of amiable and 
cordial relations between employer and 
employed — is today more generally rec- 
ognized and in greater evidence than 
ever before. 

"While our purchases from the United 
States continue to be unreasonably high, 
involving, as a result of exchange, great 
loss to Canadian buyers, our imports 
from the Motherland have greatly in- 
creased. This is a pleasing feature of 
our trade in view of the exceedingly 
heavy financial strain and serious dis- 
ruption of trade which war imposed on 
Great Britain. During eight months of 
the current fiscal year our purchases in 
her markets have increased from $59,- 
000 ; 000 to $163,000,000. 

"Today our trade figures show that 
Canada, after the war, is a greater Can- 
ada than Canada before the war. Ex- 
ports for the year ended March 31, 1914, 
$455,000,000. Last year was look- 
ed upon as a good year; the people were 



prosperous and our exports amounted to 
$1,2*6,000,000. Increased prices, of 
course, had much to do with the result, 
but it is almost three times as great as 
six yeaaas before. At present, when so 
much d. press ion is talked of, it is en- 
couraging to note that our exports for 
the past eight months amounted to $841,- 
000,000 and are $2,700,000 greater than 
for the same eight months of last year." 



Sales Officials 
Regard Future 
With Optimism 

Shareholders of the Canadian Fur 
Auction Sales Company Limited, of Mont- 
real, held their first annual meeting re- 
cently when the report and balance sheet 
covering the initial year's activities was 
submitted. The result of the twelve 
months" operations, it was explained, 
had been adversely affected by the 
changes in the fur trade during the per- 
iod, but an early improvement was 
looked for and the future of the com- 
pany regarded with optimism. 

No action was taken on the prefer- 
red dividend, the directors having come 
to the decision to await a clarification 
of the situation before announcing the 
usual quarterly payment of 1% per 
cent. 

There was a good representation at 
the meeting, during which the conditions 
prevailing in the fur market were dis- 
cussed. The opinion was expressed that 
furs would continue in demand, and that 
notwithstanding the fact that values had 
suffered considerably from a period of 
speculation, prices would gradually be 
re-established. The fur business, it was 
pointed out, was essentially a Canadian 
basic one and, while it, like other trade 
lines, has been subjected to the recent 
depressing influences, was capable of 
being developed along highly prosperous 
lines in the near future. The com- 
pany held a successful auction sale in 
March last, and is preparing for another 
on the 31st of this month. 

Officers and directors were re-elected 
without change as follows: Hon. Lome 
C. Webster, president; R. S. Coltart, 
managing director; A. Pierce, E. E. Cum- 
mings, jr., Sir Herbert Holt, J. W. Mc- 
Connell, A. J. Brown, F. Cooper, A. A. 
Allan, R. P. Gough, R. T. Holman and 
W. M. McWilliams. 



SALE IN ST. LOUIS 

Funsten Bros, and Co. have announced 
their next public auction fur sale in St. 
Louis on February 7, 1921, and days fol- 
lowing. 



Dry (I otitis Revieiv 



111 



The Department Store's Fur Section 

Service Very Important, and Price a Leading Feature — Carefully Chosen and Varied Stock 
Will Boost Business — Careful Study of Customers' Needs and Preferences is Appre- 
ciated by Successful Fur Buyer. 



IN the department store fur section, 
no less than in the other parts of 
the firm's activities, the sales-staff 
needs to appreciate the difference which 
exists between the many classes of cus- 
tomers who patronize the store. It 
should not be necessary to point out 
that the needs of the wealthy customers 
require a quite different view-point on 
the part of the selling staff from that 
ordinarily called into prominence by the 
average purchaser of furs. As a matter 
of fact, the selling of furs entails the 
need for close study on the part of the 
staff, who do not always appreciate the 
twofold appeal which such garments 
as fur peltry possess, and consequently 
they often fail to identify and cater 
successfully to the particular clientele 
who most frequently patronize the de- 
partment store. 

If the store specializes in a popular 
priced fur section, then the problem is 
not so complex. It is the department 
which caters equally to the rich and 
those of moderate means that should 
study its customers with more care and 
insight. In the majority of cases when a 
customer comes to the department-store 
fur section she is bent upon securing the 
most value for her money, otherwise, 
she would go to one of the more exclusive 
furriers, who would show her such in- 
dividual models as would command a 
price commensurate with their distinc- 
tion of design. 

Since price is the first and most im- 
portant consideration, such a customer 
has probably shopped extensively be- 
fore coming in and is fairly well ac- 
quainted with values in the line she has 
in mind. If she has visited some half a 
dozen other stores in the city, she nat- 
urally expects to make her purchase 
wherever the best value is to be found. 
Therefore, it is worth while to ascertain 
what she expects to pay for a certain 
garment, and what features and details 
she most particularly desires. Do not 
lay so much stress upon style as value 
with this class of customer; she is look- 
ing for durability as well as low prices. 

Advertise Special Values 

The fur buyer who is constantly on 
the alert and who has secured a good 
stock of moderate priced pelts should 
advertise unusual values as prominently 
as possible. This winter more than at 
any other time, the public is on the look- 
out for fur bargains, so the fur depart- 
ment must never lack a special price 
inducement. If the prices are right, the 
department store fur section cannot fail 
to make good this season and the 



special offerings by manufacturers should 
not be overlooked by the management. 

The department store customer is usu- 
ally in a hurry for her garment. She 
does not want to wait to have a coat or 
neck-piece made up for her order as 
a rule and if she cannot find exactly 
what she wants immediately, she will go 
elsewhere in search of it. Here is where 
a wide assortment of merchandise is of 
paramount importance, even at the end 
of the season. Even the seeker after 
bargains is not impressed by too much 
sameness in the display of merchandise 
in a fur department, and therefore the 
buyer must be possessed of unerring 
judgment in selecting the right type of 
fur garments. 

Customers of the class above described 
not only want goods at a reasonable 
price, which are well made and are good 
value for the price, but they also set 
great store in their inmost heart upon 
good appearance and up-to-date cut. 
The average customer of the department 
store fur section is of the moderately 
well to do class — housewife, steno- 
grapher, clerk, etc., and in order to ap- 
peal to the tastes and means of each in- 
dividual, the fur stock has to be chosen 
with unusual care so that models shall 
be smart without being extreme, and of 
good value without being costly. In 
such departments, most business is done 
upon the staple coat styles rather than in 
the more extreme sports or wrap models. 

All these points enumerated, bearing 
upon the price, value, style and selection 
of fur garments, are best studied by 
means of constant contact with custom- 
ers and salesclerks. As conditions vary 
in each store, no indications can be 
given as to what the public prefers; only 
by noting the trend of popular demand 
in regard to the question can those in 
charge attempt to render satisfactory 
service to the public. If certain prices 
or certain styles sell very readily, the 
task of the buyer is certainly simplified, 
he cannot go astray in concentrating 
upon the lines in question. Among the 
really popular lines in the department 
stores are coats of Hudson and electric 
seal, muskrat, opossum and pony, with 
occasional calls for raccoon, wombat, 
mole and squirrel. Such pelts as mink, 
Alaska seal or any other of the very high 
priced skins are rarely called for. How- 
ever Hudson seal is quite the staple 
line despite its price. 

A repair department is a profitable 
side issue with the department store 
nowadays, especially since the public has 
shown a decided preference for wearing 



its old furs rather than buying new ones. 
This part of the business is best empha- 
sized during the Spring months, of course, 
when the question of storage is upper- 
most in people's minds. An interesting 
booklet has been prepared by one -firm 
for its customers, which is entitled: 
"Keeping Your Furs Beautiful," and 
which illustrates the necessity for tin- 
cleansing of furs by comparison with the 
habits of fur-bearing animals. To quote 
from this interesting little brochure: "It 
is seldom possible to improve on Na- 
ture's methods of cleaning fur garments. 
Experts have devised electrical and me- 
chanical appliances which remove the 
dust and the matted tangles from the 
finest furs without injuring them in the 
slightest. They also overcome another 
very serious difficulty. These appliances 
remove every tiny moth egg which may 
have become seated in the fur. A five 
cent piece would hold hundreds of these 
little eggs and a half dozen of them 
are sufficient to ruin thousands of dol- 
lars' worth of splendid furs." 

The same booklet further impresses on 
fur owners the need for careful storage 
of the garments during the summer. 

Such hints as these have been of great 
interest to customers who have frequent- 
ly asked for copies of this artistic and 
informative booklet. 

Display is Important 

A final point of importance to the re- 
tail fur department is the manner of 
display and arrangement of merchandise. 
No matter whether the goods featured 
are cheap or costly, they must be as at- 
tractively displayed as though they were 
products of the King's own furrier. 
Emphasis will naturally be laid upon the 
smartest of the models for display pur- 
poses but any fur will look well when dis- 
played with the maximum of care. 

The fur department finally must not 
only sell value in its goods but it must 
render service. In these days of keen 
competition, the store which serves best 
is the one to capture the trade. Sales 
clerks should familiarize themselves with 
as much information regarding furs as 
possible in order the better to talk intelli- 
gently to prospective purchasers. When 
garments of considerable cost are under 
discussion, a customer needs much as- 
surance and reliable guidance in making 
her decision. Judgment, patience, tact 
and knowledge of the stock carried are 
absolutely essential for the successful 
conduct of such a department. In fact 
service should be on a par with the 
exclusive furrier's stores as far as pos- 
sible. 



112 



Dry Goods Review 



Southern Fashions Throw a Warm Ray 

Dainty to a Degree Are the Smart Sports Togs and Fluffy Organdie Frocks, the Satin Cha- 
peaux and Silk Sweater Coats Offered for Fashionable Women Going South — They 
Are Also the Forerunners in Stvle of the Canadian Summer. 



THE "Trip to the South" at- 
mosphere pervades the smart 
shops in the larger centres, and it 
is really quite refreshing to wander 
leisurely through the salons at this 
time of year and find on every side 
perfect poems in airy organdies, heavy 
voiles and supple silk woven fabrics. 
Although the average merchant caters 
ever so slightly or not at all to a trade 
who require Summer clothes in Winter, 
the fashionable openings in the 
centres where such requirements 
are taken care of must not be 
ignored for the togs for southern 
shores which are being displayed while 
the snow is on the ground, are, after 
all, the advance guard of the Summer 
fashions; and in these smart creations 
may be viewed the first glimpses of 
what late Spring has in store for the 
Summer of 1921. It is also true that 
these models made up in warm weather 
fabrics also reflect the best features 
that will characterize the Spring models 
in cloth, and the lines of both suit cos- 
tume and one-piece frock prove of un- 
usual interest for this reason. The mer- 
chant who has delayed in placing his 
orders for Summer will be safe in tak- 
ing as a guide these pretty orders for 
Southern wear, and at all events he 
will do well to note the features em- 
phasized, for as the weeks pass by and 
Easter approaches he will become more 
and more familiar with the lines which 
are first introduced through the medium 
of fashions for Winter resorts. 

A Welcome Contrast 

In Toronto unusual importance has 
attached to the Southern wardrobe, and 
the large shops, as well as the uptown 
modistes, have been exceptionally busy 
with orders. Directly the Christmas 
season was over the holiday to warmer 
climes was the chief topic of interest 
in the dress wcrld and for the past week 
or two has been featured to the exclu- 
sion of all other departments by many 
of the leading shops. After the ex- 
hibits made up of luxurious furs, rich 
velvet fabrics, heavy laces and metals 
and models for the Canadian out-of- 
doors, the woman who had struggled 
through the usual Christmas shopping 
was most pleasantly impressed with the 
refreshing scenes pictured in large show 
windows and in the departments where 
the fashionable wardrobe is ever the first 
consideration. 

Smart Exhibits 

To encourage a renewed interest in 
buying which was given such a splendid 
impetus the last two weeks of December, 



the stores made their resolutions appar- 
ent even before the first of January, and 
by the time the new year made its ap- 
pearance the campaign for bigger and 
better business was already well in pro- 
gress. The windows were resplendent 
with the most captivating settings and 
the figui'es in the foregrounds were more 
bewitchingly attired than in similar 
showings for some seasons past. Whole 
salons were also converted into pictur- 
esque beach, sittings, which seemed to 
gather warmth from an imaginary 
tropical sun. 

Sports clothes are well to the fore. 
Many of the window displays during the 
past week or two have represented 
smart gatherings on shore or hotel ver • 




A Beach Trotteur 

Delightful because of its utter simpli- 
city is this little cotton frock for mornings. 
It combines a plaid and a plain cotton crash 
material in skirt and bodice. The scarf on 
the shiny black satin sports hat matches 
the overblouse. — Designed for Dry Goods 
Review. 



andah, and, of course, have given scope 
and charm to the dainty outing cos- 
tumes worn by the smiling wax ladies. 
White is to enjoy a well deserved vogue, 
according to the partiality shown for all 
white in these sports models for South- 
ern wear. The white novelty cotton and 
fancy weave in silk are given equal 
prominence, while woollen fabrics are 
ultra smart. 

Ratine is likely to be featured promin- 
ently in these sports frocks, and will re- 
appear with printed patterns upon white 
or colored grounds. Crepe de Chine will 
even serve as a sports frock fabric, as 
well as linen of heavy quality. Shan- 
tung, with colored bandings, is another 
smart arrival for Summer dresses, and 
the use of vividly contrasting waists 
and skirts for sports wear is predicted. 
Orange silk will form the basis for many 
such skirts to be worn in conjunction 
with tie-back blouses of white. Angora 
wool embroidery will be featured upon 
Canton crepe for Summer wear, and 
many heavily crossbarred wash silks are 
spoken of, from which severely simple 
gowns will be fashioned. One pretty 
costume seen introduced a self-striped 
silk skirt, gathered slightly to a smart 
little yoke section and showing pleats 
on the hips to give just sufficient free- 
dom without too much width. With this 
pure white skirt was worn a deep cop- 
per tinted silk tuxedo, with flat shallow 
collar and girdle of self. The smart 
little sports hat and buck shoes showed 
the same smart color combination. It 
would look as though the very vivid- 
hued costume is to be of secondary in- 
terest, judging from the dainty pale 
shades and the subdued dark tones that 
are being shown in sweater coats, and 
suit costumes for Southern sports wear. 

Soft Shades Are Favored 

Scarcely any of the advance displays 
have featured any dazzling effects and 
the great majority of early exhibits have 
featured smart all white effects, or at- 
tractive combinations of white and navy, 
pearl grey and navy, white and copper 
or tan, and white with a soft reseda 
green. 

The black and white combination is 
unusually chic and direct from Paris 
comes the decree that this vogue is to 
take the lead in millinery. It will also 
be featured in smart sports suits in 
silk, wool or cotton; and, the fashion 
writers at the resorts who claim that 
the novelty striped coats, closely re- 
sembling the blazers of by-gone seasons, 
are to rival all the sweater variations 
Continued on page 115 



Dry Goods Revieu 



11: 



What to Expect in the Way of Hats 

Paris Has Provided Variety and Artistry of Design — The Importations Have Arrived, and 

Buyers Are Now in New York — Upon Their Choice Will Depend the Trend of 

Spring Millinery Styles — Canadian Buyers Early on the Scene of Action. 



IT is expected that by the first week 
in February there will be plenty of 
encouraging- information from the 
wholesale millinery trade. The past few 
months have been quiet, and the fact 
that they are eager for an active Spring- 
is evidenced by the early influx to New 
York of buyers from all over Canada 
and outside points of the United States. 
The large Toronto houses were repre- 
sented among those present even before 
the first of the year, and, according to 
advance reports, they have found some 
decidedly interesting novelties. A gen- 
eral feeling of confidence is finding a 
place in millinery circles again and the 
fact that buying is commencing so early 
augurs well for Spring business. 

Prices for Spring are fairly high 
which means that they may go higher 
during the course of the season — for mil- 
linery requirements after all are made 
from cottons, silks and woolen fabrics, 
and if the made-up motifs and materials 
are demanding fairly stiff prices while 
cottons and silks are still down, when 
these materials firm up the manufac- 
tured millinery materials will advance 
as a result. In spite of this, the men 
in the trade are hopeful of big business. 
"It must be remembered that the millin- 
ery trade is different in this respect from 
any other line," stated a buyer for a 
large Toronto firm this month just be- 
fore his departure for New York. "Mil- 
linery is decidedly a fancy line, and un- 
like the staples, if in favor the price 
does not count. The American houses 
have been quiet for a long period. They 
are opening up for a big season and are 
offering great variety in trimmings and 
ornamental motifs. A leaf has been 
taken out of the Paris designer's book 
and unusual mounts in feathers and fo- 
liage, ribbon ornaments and straw nov- 
elties are being manufactured in all the 
new shades and in unusual attractive 
color combinations." 

Novelties From Paris. 

Dry Goods Review was recently shown 
an unusual collection of novelty braids 
which had been imported for the Spring- 
trade from a French house famed for 
its artistic manipulation of straw braids. 
These braids were narrow in width and 
made to resemble cut ostrich bands with 
a glycerined finish. 

The effect was most unusual especially 
as the braids were developed in vivid 
hues such as yellow, the new blue-green 
and henna tones as well as in black and 
white. 

Straw novelties also include a variety 
of odd weaves in open work straw 
plaques or crowns, which are shipped 




For the Sunny South 

At this between-season time interest centres on togs for the 
trip to the South. Milliners are keenly interested in designing- 
smart headgear for warmer climes and therefore the originality 
of this charming model will appeal to them. Silver grapes are 
strewn over the soft-tucked crown. A jaunty, upturned brim 
spells youth. 



from France where they are made flat 
and with a circular edge so that they 
can be made up only as they are required 
and to suit the individual requirements 
of the millinery houses who purchase 
them. These straw plaques and odd 
straw trimmings are distinctly French, 
and will represent one of the vivid color 
notes of Spring. 

Flowers are Strong. 

Flowers will be in evidence for trim- 
ming. Quite a gay assortment of silk, 
velvet and even cotton posies are being 
featured and many of the French impor- 
tations show whole crowns of flowers in 
artistic profusion, mounted above a 
drooping and sometimes transparent 
brim. Other models show a crown of 
ribbon and a brim made entirely of 
flowers such as a charming Augustine 
and Andree model with the crown fash- 
ioned of black satin ribbon tied into a 



huge bow on the left side with ends 
dropping to the shoulder.- A firm little 
halo of pink rosebuds constituted the 
brim which lent piquancy and youthful 
charm to the face of the wearer. 

Straw and Feathers. 

The combination of straw and feathers 
presents another novelty which will be 
used to captivate milady's fancy this 
Spring, and Egyptian lines will again be 
followed by smart chapeaux which will 
boast a crown of straw and a brim with 
side ornaments built out of tiny vivid 
hued feathers. 

Caprices of the Ribbon. 

There is no telling where the ribbon 
will lead to. Sometimes it stands bolt 
upright on the front of an upturned 
brim. Sometimes it ties in a lovely 
soft bow with ends like a sash, and 
Continued on page 115 



Dry Goods Review 



Montreal's Interest Awakens Early 

Milliners Report Excellent Season's Business and Departments in Retail Stores Almost 

Cleared of Winter Stocks — Colorful Spring is Promised, Flowers in Gay Hues and 

Cellophane and Other Shiny Effects to be Featured Early. 



T 7 1TH only slightly over a dozen 
* V/ felt or velvet hats left out of 
* all the winter's supply, one mil- 
inery department in a Montreal store 
s already featuring its advance Spring 
nodels for 1921. In a conversation with 
the buyer Dry Goods Review w^s in- 
formed that the millinery section of the 
store had done record trade and was 
preparing for Spring with more elabor- 
ate plans than ever. 

Most Montreal buyers are setting off 
for New York during the week of Janu- 
ary 3rd and are planning to hold their 
Spring or pre-Easter openings about the 
first of March, or thereabouts, in order 
to be ready for the unusually early de- 
mand. 

To judge from the imported models 
already on view, the - woman who wishes 
a change from the brilliant/ metallic 
chapeaux so popular just now will find 
a charming variety to select from in the 
new small draped turbans of dull fin- 
ished cire which provide a decidedly new 
note for mid-Winter selling. Such mo- 
dels as these are adaptable for tailored 
or dress wear, both at home and for 
travelling, and are more distinctly 
French in style than most of the Spring 
models shown by Paris houses. One small 
toque was made entirely of the cire 
satin in black, with alternating folds of 
georgette creased vertically all around 
the close brim, and simply trimmed with 
a scarf of the georgette caught with a 
rhinestone crescent. Other shades of 
the cire shown were nigger brown, hen- 
na, navy and a sort of gun-metal gray, 
but the preference is for "pheasant 
sharii 

The outstanding features of the mo- 
dels shown was the preponderance of 
"off the face" brims shown, whether 
from side to side or from back to front. 
Many dashing effects are featured, 
wherein the draped bow or ribbon cocade 
is placed at a slanting angle, decidedly 
smart and new. Crowns tend towards 
a little extra height, draped when of 
soft fabric, or where a supple effect is 
desired, although many milliners are 
looking for a revival of interest in the 
stiffer shapes a little later. Side trim- 
mings are distinctly stronger than front 
i ts. 
Draped turbans and chin-chin sailors 
are among the best lines observed this 
month, and the addition of quaint velvet 
flowers in delicate colorings provides the 
touch of novelty desired. Little colored 
cockades of picot-edged ribbon make an 
original trimming for certain conven- 
tional little toques of dark satin, while 
.still others feature tufts of uncurled 



ostrich just over each ear, which are dis- 
tinctly dignified and dressy. Flowers, 
however, are predicted as the leaders in 
trimmings, particularly when made of 
velvets and silks, as well as in the usual 
varieties, the small blossoms being par- 
ticularly strong. 

Models in Straw 

Advance straw models show an almost 
monotonous preference for the turned- 
up brim, with pointed front, either in a 
tricorne or Napoleonic outline or its 
many variations. At one house, Dry 
Goods Review counted 15 different mo- 



difications of this theme, each of which 
was new and decidedly effective. Rib- 
bons, particularly moire, gros-grains and 
cire satins, will be largely used to 
fashion smart cockades and frills, loops 
and bows for the adornment of these 
trim shapes, and the fad for stiff up- 
standing mounts and high effects will 
doubtless be cleverly developed from 
both ribbons and wings. 

The vogue for the draped veil or scarf 
continues unabated for wearing with 
these small turbans, and the majority of 
models shown for present wear are dis- 
played each with its own veil softly 





Smart Square Veil 



Large mesh veils are modish for Spring and are chic for wear with the 
close-fitting silk hats which come hefore the flowers. 



/>/•// Goods Ileview 



MILLINERY 



115 



draped about it, so that its future wear- 
er may judge the complete effect at 
once. , 

Mid-Winter sales of millinery continue 
to be featured in most of the stores, but 
to judge from the depleted counter dis- 
plays, the majority of stores have clone 
an unusually good Winter's business and 
have little or nothing to carry over. 
Many of the makers state that business 
has been normal, even in face of prevail- 
ing conditions, and high cost of ma- 
terials. 

Cellophane Returns 

A word regarding cellophane is most 
important this season. This novel fabric 
is being shown at the wholesale show- 
rooms in an extraordinary range of nov- 
elties, as for instance in brocaded, woven, 
metallic and plain effects by the yard 
in 18-inch wide samples. Jet black, cop- 
per and all the gamut of "pheasant" 
shades are featured and there is nothing- 
newer this season for the construction 
of dainty chapeaux. The combination 
of cellophane and satin is much spoken 
of, and it is said that the day of the 
narrow straw braid is over and gone. 
Brims of cellophane in rough and smooth 
or broken finish are shown, which will 
later be completed by softly draped 
crowns of fabric, either in a contrasting 
or harmonizing color. It is not ex- 
pected that the all black hat will pre- 
dominate after Easter, and certainly, if 
the vogue for massed flower e/fects 
lives up to its promise, the Easter hat 
will be truly brilliant. Ribbon will not 
be overlooked either, and many gorgeous 
brocaded and novelty patterns are 
shown already, among which is the "cro- 
codile" ribbon, which closely imitates a 
leather finish. Beads, especially the 
rather large, wooden variety, are used 
upon fabric hats and provide a change 
from the so prevalent metallic fabrics of 
the past Winter. Wings and lacquered 
ornaments in vivid colors, glycerined 
ostrich are also used on the line-up of 
Spring millinery. 

Some of the newest shapes are trim- 
med with small dull beads in delicate 
tracery effects rather than in solid pat- 
terns. On some of the wider brimmed 
models there is a use of the wide fagot- 
ting of floss on georgette shapes, and 
large brimmed shapes of the georgette 
have the crowns trimmed with wide rib- 
bons that are deeply frayed on the edges 
to form long hanging ends. 

One small collection of French models 
seen recently featured a notabl? tendency 
toward the use of the drooping trimming, 
and, whenever possible, glycerined 
ostrich in long, floating tasselled effect 
was used. On the more conservative 
shapes of black satin, facings of ostrich 
tips were bent around so that they 
looked like a series of overlapping 
leaves. 

A Novel Fabric 

Batavia cloth in dull colorings is ano- 
ther strong favorite. It resembles 




coarse canvas cloth and is rather wiry in 
texture. Cord braid interwoven with a 
metallic thread is used for more tailored 
shapes, and cellophane and Malines braid 
are combined for another line. Raffia 
flower motifs are embroidered upon cello- 
phane brims of plain colors, but the nov- 
elty allover cloth which shows color be- 
neath black is used a great deal for 
gowns and small shapes. 

Buyers are of the opinion that there 
will be quite a demand for the sheer hat 
later on, and for this demand there is 
rhown Malines in black in corded and 
pleated effects. Some of these sheer 
fabrics have edges of royal or Wedgwood 
blue ostrich. Lace and Maline and 
burnt ostrich are combined in others. 
There is also much of the Maline hair 
braid used sometimes in combination 
with cellophane. In many of the large 
shapes where the glycerined ostrich is 
used, the edges are silvered, probably for 
the reason that grey is to be such a 
factor in the new season. 



elties are piayed for first place, there are 
no restrictions as to entries and practic- 
ally anything that has merit has a sport- 
ing chance for favor. 

Word comes from Paris that black and 
white is very much to the fore as in the 
Springs of the years gone by, but there 
is quite a commotion over the vogue that 
has been claimed by "Quaker grey." This 
vogue was predicted by Dry Goods Re- 
view on excellent authority some time 
ago, and has already flourished to a sur- 
prising extent through the winter 
months. This has not detracted one 
whit from the Spring vogue for grey, 
and the fact that costumes, accessories 
and even footwear are inclining strongly 
towards grey, only proves that it is in 
for a strong run. 

Next month Dry Goods Review will 
give its readers a chance to read what the 
buyers think of grey, and what they in- 
tend to do about it and all their other 
Spring millinery plans. 



SOUTHERN FASHIONS THROW A 
WARM RAY 

Continued from page 112 



WHAT TO EXPECT IN THE 
OF HATS 

Continued from page 113 



creeps around to nestle against the curls 
which hide milady's ear. Now it is seen 
in a saucy cockade on a stiff tailored 
brim, again it appears in a perfect clus- 
ter to fill in the coiffure under a quaint 
poke shape with the back brim upturned. 
Streamers are extensively encouraged 
and here again the ribbon enjoys itself 
without restraint. It may be wide or 
very very narrow, and it may match 
the chapeau exactly or provide the most 
interesting contrast. It may be fringed, 
or on uneven edge may be chosen with 
equal composure for ribbon in any shape 
or form, both dull and of shiny surface 
is to be a most important feature of the 
Easter bonnet. 

All Hats are Welcome. 

The wide, the high, the low, the tail- 
ored, the drooping and the softly draped 
models each have their place in the 
Spring Revue — "Variety is the spice of 
life," said the millinery makers of Paris 
in fashioning the world's headgear for 
Spring, 1C21. Every type of face has 
been considered and while certain nov- 



also proclaim the black and white com- 
bination unquestionably to the fore. 

The dainty frocks for afternoon wear 
are unusually pretty and youthful in de- 
sign. Simplicity marks the most ex- 
clusive models, and the tiniest bit of 
hand embroidery serves to decorate 
these frocks, which exploit all manner 
of tucks, self folds, dainty frills and 
ruches. Lace dyed to match the color 
of the model is also frequently featured, 
and very smart indeed is the touch of 
black ribbon or wool stitching on the 
pretty little dress of Nile green, softest 
blue, maize, rose or lavender organdie. 
WAY' r - r i 

Sports Hats 

The chapeaux designed to accompany 
these dainty models are almost invari- 
ably in a silk-finished fabric or a com- 
bination of shiny straw and satin. Little 
or no trimming is shown and orchid and 
grey are very smartly featured. The 
accessories of the Southern wardrobe 
are legion. Scarfs, gloves and hosiery- 
show a partiality ior pretty, soft shades 
when the pure white is not favored and 
the most original designs grace these 
many pretty vanities which go to make 
the feminine wardrobe the thing of 
charm and fascinating interest that it 
is. Sunshades, bags and even jewellery- 
are carefully featured in the smart 
Southern wardrobe and special stress is 
also laid on that all important depart- 
ment — lingerie. Bathing togs as well 
as outing modes are being featured in 
the advanced showings; and only the 
"blue ruin" person would dare predict — 
after a glimpse at the "Southern Trip" 
windows — anything but a delightfu' 
Summer season. Dame Fashion's part in 
least has been well rehearsed in these 
charming modes, which have been pre- 
sented for the warm weather trip in 
Winter. 






M 1 L L I N E R Y 



V 




Dry Goods Revi( iu 



Oftrmg 
JxLillinery 

Advance 
Snowing 

Model 
Hats 



Commencing Tuesday, First February 



Newest Fashions Exclusive Styles 

Business duringjthe coming season will go to 
those whoj have the merchandise. In view 
of this we have arranged that our stock shall 
be of exceptional merit' and attractiveness. 



J\ew J^derchandise 



New Prices 



j 



Inspection cordially invited 



G. GOULDING & SONS 



WW innipeg 
66 King St. 



55 Wellington St. West, Toronto 

Ottawa 
193 Sparks St. 



Hamilton 
283^JonnSt. N. 




Dry Goods Jicview 



MILLINERY 



117 



c/he Dealer who sells 
Ga^e Hats is assured 
of three profits: 

(1) The direct profit from the sale. 

(2) The indirect profit from the added 
prestige incidental to handling a 
line so largely advertised and so 
favorably known. 

(3) The future profit from customers 
who, having had entire satisfaction 
in the style and wearing qualities 
of their Gage Hats, are pleased to 
continue their patronage and 
influence others. 







S0Xy PRODUCERS 



OF CORRECT 
MILLINERY 



CHICAGO 
NEW YORK 

PARIS 



- 



Dry Goods Review 



Orders Needed to Keep Mills Running 

Manufacturers of Knitted Underwear Declare That They Cannot Work on Speculation 
: .ers— -Closing Down Plants After Strenuous Effort to Get Business — Fall 
Quotations Offer Attractive Reductions. 



A CRITICAL stage has been reach- 
ed in the knitted goods trade. The 
mill owners have put forth a 
strenuous effort to avoid an eruption 
with apparently no response whatever 
from their customers. The result at the 
t is the gradual cutting down on 
production with resultant" disorganiza- 
tion and increasing unemployment. 
Mills feeling their responsibilities 
towards their operatives have fairly beg- 
ged for orders, that they might keep all 
their plants working even part time. 
Efforts have been almost futile uni- 
versally and the closing down of plants 
continues. Unless customers commence 
to place orders without another week's 
delay the situation will grow unwelcomely 
serious and the present crisis in the mills 
will eventually reflect on the retail trade. 
From Ontario and Quebec come the 
same reports, and the mill owners, who 
are very much worried, have frankly 
stated their case to Dry Goods Review- 
in the hope that if the situation were 
thoroughly understood by all branches of 
the trade, an unfortunate set back coMld 
be averted. 

An Appeal to Customers 

The following letter, gent out to all 
customers by a prominent Central On- 
tario manufacturer of women's and 
children's underwear, is representative 
of many similar efforts to stir up busi- 
ness. It reads in part: 

"You, as one of our friends in the 
trade, may be interested to know that 
we have recently closed, for an indefinite 
period, three of our factories, throwing 
out of employment about 500 employees. 
This condition is caused by the holding- 
f.ff policy of many buyers. 

"Our prices for Fall, 1921, as presented 
to you, show a decrease of 33 1-3 per 
cent, below our last price list, and we 
cannot see where prices will be lower, 
unless a reduction in wages takes place 
and this does not seem likely at the pres- 
ent time. 

"If you want satisfactory deliveries 
next Fall, we urge you to place your re- 
quirements now. If not your total re- 
quirements, send at least a portion. 

"Please give this your earnest consid- 
eration." 

"What response did we get?" com- 
mented the owner of this particular mill. 
"None." 

The superintendent of salesmen was 
also interviewed at this plant, and he 
declared that every man had urged cus- 
tomers to place orders for just a small 
percentage of their usual business, but 




Models in Silk 

Silk undergarments are growing in favor, 
practical models being preferred by the 
Canadian trade. This serviceable vest 
number and the knickers with elastic run 
at the knee are lines of the Queen Quality 
lines manufactured by the St. Catharines 
Silk Mills. The hose are the famous Cana- 
dian "Venus" brand. Illustrated by court- 
esy of Richard L. Baker, Toronto, sole dis- 
tributors of these two lines. 



their proposition was flatly refused on 
every side. "We asked for part orders 
of total requirements, that we might 
have just enough work to keep things 
running along but our customers were 
absolutely cold. We haven't an order 
for Fall lines, yet we know without a 
doubt that stocks everywhere are low." 
"What will be the result," asked 
another mill owner, "when purchasers 



do come into the market? There will be 
a big rush for goods and the merchants 
will never be able to get orders filled on 
time." 

This point was particularly dwelt upon 
at a meeting of the ladies' underwear 
manufacturers of Canada, held in Hamil- 
ton, Ont., early this month. It was em- 
phasized that retailers should appreciate 
that goods are not being made up in the 
hope that they will be required later on. 

None of the mills are working on spec- 
ulative orders. They can't afford to run 
along without any orders in sight and 
they are in many cases averse to wage 
cutting. 

A knitted goods man was recently 
asked his opinion as to the advisability 
of reducing wages. His questioner was 
the owner of a big jam factory. "We 
have not even contemplated cutting 
wages yet, and don't want to," was the 
mill owner's reply. "Ninety per cent, 
of our employees are girls. Their living 
expenses are high and they need all the 
money they are making. We are not 
making any reductions." "Well, we 
are," was the jam manufacturer's reply. 

It is not likely that wages of opera- 
tives will be cut in the knitted goods 
mills however, even though the outlook 
is very discouraging at present. There 
is always a shortage of underwear. The 
shops are never overstocked for long and 
at the present time it is very apparent 
that there is a scarcity in many lines. 

The mills report that orders for 
Spring were splendid. Spring business 
was surprisingly good, but although a 
reduction of 33 1-3 per cent, is offered on 
Fall lines there is not the slightest in- 
clination to place orders. 

No Reductions Can be Expected 

"These prices quoted now on knitted 
underwear are practically a basis for 
1921-22 selling," said a representative 
for two leading mills in Quebec. "Prices 
may even stiffen," he continued, "because 
there are no surplus supplies and all job 
lots are being disposed of at sight. If 
every retailer were in the market, there 
would not be more than six months' sup- 
ply available. And now that all mills 
are running on short time, and produc- 
tion is at its lowest ebb, and reckless 
competition has led to a confused state 
of affairs, I can only say that there can 
be no change except for the- better, and 
I strongly advise continuous placing at 
present prices if the situation is to be 
saved." 

He further pointed out that the only 
(Continued on page 120) 



Dry Goods Review 



119 



Features of the New Lines Offered 

Spring Underwear Lines Varied and Attractive — Good Assortment Also Offered For Fall- 
New Silk Striped Fabric Being Used — Vogue for "Opera" Vest Styles Continues 

Pink Garments Popular. 



IN spite of the quiet which prevails in 
the knitted underwear trade, the Can- 
adian manufacturers have not per- 
mitted their lines to grow less attractive 
nor the varieties to dwindle. One mill 
visited this month by a representative of 
Dry Goods Review is showing 250 lines 
for Spring and 150 for Fall. A complete 
tour of the sample rooms was made by 
the writer and it was most gratifying to 
see such a splendid range of finely made 
garments being offered by Canadian mak- 
ers. All lines viewed compared most fa- 
vorably with any imported lines seen 
which sell at similar prices, and although 
the trimming features were not so 
strongly played up, it must be admitted 
that many garments benefited in com- 
parison with corresponding lines import- 
ed for the Canadian market from the 
point of quality. 

Good workmanship, durability, excel- 
lence of material, amount of materials 
used, design and fit are all points that 
seem to have been pretty well studied 
during the past few years with the re- 
sult that the mills in Canada are now 
turning out lines of which they may be 
justly proud. 

While some criticism may be in order 
with regard to the silk hose and under- 
wear turned out during the war, and 
which was on the market for some con- 
siderable time afterwards, it must be re- 
membered that at that time the demand 
was so great that little "grading" was 
necessary and there was no such thing 
as classifying into firsts, seconds and 
thirds. Everything was "first" because 
people would pay any price regardless of 
quality when the shortage existed. Now 
that the market has been quiet there is 
a revived demand for better quality of 
goods and great improvement is noted. 
Silk hosiery is sold according to its qual- 
ity — if it is the best grade the price cor- 
responds, if "seconds" or "thirds" it is 
marked such and sold accordingly. 

Fine Range Available 

The same influences have resulted in 
a pronounced improvement in the lines 
of under-garments shown. Excellent cut, 
good material and good value is apparent 
in the Spring lines. The mills report 
good business in Spring lines, although 
they are unanimous in reporting th^t 
business in Fall lines has been most dis- 
appointing. However, the goods are 
available and for the merchant who is 
buying the range is wide and obtainable 
at most reasonable prices. 

Novelties for Spring 

The Spring lines include among the 
prime favorites numerous versions of 



the opera vest — extra long vest models 
in mercerized effects and in cotton, fash- 
ioned with gathered tops or plain, and 
held in place with substantial ribbon 
shoulder straps. The elastic run top 
with its dainty ribbon casing is unusu- 
ally fashionable, and the demand is still 
strong for mercerized and cotton vests 
in rink or white with silk tops. These 
are serviceable for evening wear when 




Vew Lines in Undies 



the ribbon shoulder straps may be slipped 
off if desired. 

The demand for pink underwear in- 
creases and in combinations and separate 
garments there is an excellent trade for 
the tinted lines as well as for white. Very 
lovely also are the fine mercerized vests 
with handsome narrow lace tops and 
fancy edge run through with silk tie 
strings. One very dainty line is cut with 
an extra long skirt section which reaches 
to just above the knees and is supported 
by satin shoulder straps of superior qual- 
ity ribbon. 

Silk Stripe Material 

Among the novelties shown in fabrics 
is a very pretty silk stripe cotton and 
wool mixture which is made up in vests 
of different styles and bloomers with 
elastic at the knees. These matching 
garments are decidedly dainty and serv- 
iceable and will be offered as a novelty 
in the Fall lines. Some lovely garments, 
50 per cent, wool, are also being shown 
for next Fall in which half sleeves and 
the French trimming known as "shell 
edge" are featured. 

The mills report good trade in com- 
binations and children's sleepers; also, 
one manufacturer specializing in baby 
garments and children's underwear lines, 
reports excellent demand for a coat style 
of vest for infants which fastens with 
tapes and ensures additional warmth and 
comfort for his babyship. 



(1) A dainty lisle model designed for 
evening wear; (2) A popular version of the 
opera vest; (3) A silk and wool vest with 
half sleeve and shell trimming; (4) A nov- 
elty in silk stripe handsomely finished with 
lace top and satin straps. — From the Spring 
and Fall lines offered by J. R. Moodie & 
Sons, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 



Carl Austin & Co. 
Move to Their 
New Premises 



Occupy Spacious New Premises in Fine 

Big Building at 266-268 King 

Street West, Toronto 

Carl Austin and Co., formerly located 
on College Street, Toronto, have moved 
to a more central location and are now 
occupying splendid new premises at 266- 
268 King Street West, Toronto, just west 
of the Royal Alexandra Theatre. In- 
creased business compelled this firm to 
secure larger and more oomn^odious 
showrooms, and it is hoped that greater 
satisfaction will be received by the firm's 
customers as a result of the removal to 
King Street. The factories still remain 
at West Toronto in compliance with Ll.j 
Fire Underwriters' requirements. 



120 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 



Novelty Lines 
In Sweaters and 
Children's Sets 

The sweater manufacturers report the 
situation quiet at present but are, never- 
theless, engaged upon a new line of par- 
ticularly novel and attractive models 
which include the knitted skirts and 
dresses so popular in France and the 
United States. These dresses come in 
sizes for misses and ladies and are devel- 
oped in bright colored yarns with pretty 
contrasting bands. These have long 
sleeves and a low neck and at the present 
retail price of $12 and $15 are decidedly 
splendid value. 

The newest sweaters will feature trim- 
mings of brushed wool in imitation fur 
effects in fur colors. The tuxedo collar 
will be as strong as ever, particularly 
when developed of the brushed wool with 
pockets to match. 

Woolen sets of caps and scarves have 
fallen off in popularity, only a quarter of 
last year's amount being in demand this 
Winter. The four-piece knitted outfits for 
tiny children are increasingly popular in 
plain knit wools. The brushed wool 
models are not being called for. 

The newest idea is brushed wool in 
camel's hair effect by the yard, from 
which can be made scarves, head wear 
or trimmings as the purchaser fancies. 
This comes in quiet neutral colors. 



Written Statement 

Appears In Fur Ad. 

A. J. Alexandor, of Montreal, says 
"prices are not coming down: they are 
down." 

A unique fur "ad," coming in the form 
of a statement on fur prices, recently 
appeared in Montreal newspapers above 
the signature of A. J. Alexandor, head 
of A. J. Alexandor, Ltd., furriers, with 
branches in Ottawa, Halifax and Hamil 
ton. The entire "ad," which urged pur- 
chases immediately, was a message in 
Mr. Alexander's handwriting. It stated: 

"Fur prices are not coming down. 

"They are down. 

"For the past three months we have 
bocr. steadily revising our prices to ad- 
just them to prevailing conditions. We 
are of the opinion that there cannot be 
any further reductions, as prices are 
at pre-war levels. 

"To those of our friends who have 
sufficient confidence in us to believe that 
we make this statement on'y because we 
feel it to be true, we say that there is 
nothing to be gained by waiting. The 
opportune moment to buy furs is now. 
The lowest levels have been reached. 
There can be only one movement from 
on — an upward trend." 




Trim Knitted Costume 

One of the season's smartest novelties is 
the knitted suit in any shade the devotee 
may choose. This serviceable costume for 
the young girl is developed in claret-col- 
ored wool and features a wide ribbed effect, 
a collar closing at the waistline, pockets 
and a neat belt. 

PURCHASE GAREAU'S STORE 

The departmental store at the corner 
of St. Lawrence Boulevard and Mount 
Royal Avenue, Montreal, owned by J. O. 
Gareau, has been purchased by the Royal 
Bank of Canada, which will establish a 
branch there in due course. The building 
has a frontage of 31 feet and a depth of 
113 feet. 

Officials of the bank premises depart- 
ment of the Royal Bank state that the 
purchase price was $100,000. It is in- 
tended to convert the lower floor of the 
building into a bank, while the other 
floors will be used for other purposes. 
The work of alteration will commence 
immediately, and it is expected that the 
premises will be ready for occupation in 
about a month. This is claimed to be 
the thirtieth branch of this bank in the 
district. 



ORDERS NEEDED TO KEEP MILLS 
RUNNING 

Continued from page 118 

further reduction in costs possible in 
the manufacture of heavy underwear 
would be in the event of textile labor 
cuts. But such a possibility was most 
unlikely on account of the fact that this 
class of labor is the lowest paid of all 
and should be the last to be affected. 

Therefore it cannot be expected that 
pre-war prices will ever be regained in 
this industry. 

Furthermore present prices do not 
even begin to repay the Australian wool 
grower or the British spinner, when 
Canadian mills are paying only 50 to 
60 cents per pound at mill for raw wool. 
In this class of goods there is no com- 
petition from the United States and 
therefore it is a question of supporting 
an entirely domestic product for the bene- 
fit of Canadian labor. 

One prominent wholesaler gave it as 
his opinion that no further cuts on prices 
would be made as he believes there will 
have to be a fairly heavy resumption of 
buying by Easter at the latest. All 
prices must therefore be definitely fixed 
within four weeks. 

"The mills have felt the pulse of trade, 
and mean business," said this wholesaler. 
"I advise every retailer to take stock of 
his merchandise and order requirements 
without delay. 

"The opening price quoted this Fall was 
$12.00 on a certain line of underwear 
and it has since dropped to $10.80. Even 
though a further decline of some cents 
should occur it should Be appreciated 
that this price represents rock bottom. 

"Another manufacturer is quoting a 
line, which he sold for $12.30 last season, 
at $9 this year, and is getting no re- 
sponse. Reductions have no temptation 
to the customer who does not want to 
buy. 

"We have stated that we will make 
Fall deliveries on which payments will 
not have to be made till October, but 
so far nothing that we have suggested 
has made any impression on the trade," 
he declared. "Consequently the first 
week in January we were obliged to close 
up one of our plants and let out over 
400 girls." 



TO CORRECT A MISTAKE 

In the December issue of Dry Goods 
Review a mistake occurred in the Allen 
Silk Mills advertisement of their Win- 
some Maid silk hosiery. As this error 
has created a wrong impression in the 
minds of readers about a new line of 
hosiery the Allen Silk Mills have recently 
introduced, we take this opportunity to 
correct it, though we did not happen to 
be responsible for it. The new line was 
not a "$4.00 line" as unfortunately the 
advertisement stated, but was "Number 
400" in their lines of hosiery. Further 
explanation of this correction occurs else- 
where in this issue. 



Dm Goods Review 



L21 



Novelties Shown in Dainty Lingerie 

Fine Silk Underwear and Artistic Negligees Expected to Enjoy Renewed Vogue— Drop in 
Jap Silks Will Encourage Further Indulgence in Silk and Satin Garments of Dainti- 
ness and Durability — Simple Lines Preferred. 



THE year 1921 will undoubtedly 
witness a revival of interest in 
fine silk underwear and negligees. 
The recent changes in the silk market 
have made it possible for women of 
very moderate means to possess the fin- 
est and most delicately wrought lingerie, 
equal in appearance to that formerly 
only within the reach of her wealthy 
sisters. The invention of machinery has 
of course materially aided the manufac- 
turer to put forth a greater quantity of 
these delicate yet durable garments at 
a price within reach of the middle class- 
es, and now it is possible for women to 
select undergarments for as little or 
as much as they care to pay. 

That an enormous demand existed for 
simply designed and serviceably made 
underwear is amply proved by the re- 
sponse which was forthcoming when the 
now famous athletic type of undergar- 
ments made their appearance upon the 
market. This style was not only wel- 
comed by the sports-woman but its 
many good points made it appeal strong- 
ly to the business woman as well, on ac- 
count of the ease with which such 
garments can be laundered. 

Now that such garments can be pur- 
chased in the best qualities of washable 
silk and satin, the public is gradually 
becoming aware of the advantage in ac- 
quiring such lines. The price may seem 
higher in comparison to the flimsy un- 
derwear which formerly flooded the 
market, but the economy of buying 
good material which will last longer in 
the wearing is now apparent to most 
women buyers. 

"Made in Canada" 

To meet this demand in Canada, sev- 
eral new companies have come into ex- 
istence of late which are turning out a 
very high class range of undergarments 
in wash silks and crepes, which are 
quite comparable to the best imported 
lines. The newest designs offered for 
Spring, 1921, emphasize the note of 
quality and increasing attention is paid 
to simplicity and exquisite workman- 
ship. 

Negligees, lingerie and silk petticoats 
are always in demand. Manufacturers 
in these lines are turning their atten- 
tion to the making of the sheerest flesh 
satin and crepe de Chine garments and 
are showing many lovely creations in 
their showrooms. 

Prices on these lines, it is stated, will 
approximate 20 per cent, lower than they 
were six months ago, which is a very 
encouraging feature of the season. Al- 
though much fine lace is used, the ma- 



jority of the lingerie featured is hand- 
embroidered in self and pastel shades. 
Many models showed hand scalloping in 
the finest of stitches on sleeves and 
edges, instead of the conventional hem- 
stitching and in all cases the addition 
of a spray of hand-worked flowers was 
made to heighten the effect of daintiness. 
Camisoles are just as numerous as 
ever, but the darker, more vivid color- 
ings are very infrequent. Much georg- 



ette crepe is used in conjunction with 
silk or crepe C\j Chine and is introduced 
in medallion inserts which greatly en- 
hance the appearance of these simple 
little garments. Mauve or orchid rib- 
bons are much used as shoulder straps 
on flesh camisoles, as well as the pale 
baby blue shades, and when a touch of 
hand embroidery is added in the shades, 
the effect is very dainty. 

Continued on page 144 




Group of Dainty Intimes 



This illustration provides a glimpse into milady's boudoir and reveals her in the 
most exquisite of Spring lingerie. The model on the left is gowned in a soft tinted 
negligee worn over a frothy petticoat. She is displaying the beauties of crepe de 
chine and lace Knickers when trimmed with rose buds. The model seated is wear- 
ing a charming envelope type of garment, revealing a deep lace yoke which is in 
reality a camisole. — Lingerie shown by courtesy of the Kassab Kimona Company, 
Montreal. 



122 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 





^iiiiiiiiiinii 



The Visor 4-in-l Sweater 



{Four Sweaters in One) 

Note the four ways the collar can be worn. The most practical and best 
selling coat on the market. Made in many weights in HALF-CARDIGAN, 
SHAKER, and JUMBO stitch. 

We make also this year the best SHAWL COLLARS on the market in all 
our lines. Also V-Necks, PULL-OVERS with stripes, and other lines of 
PULL-OVERS for Men and Ladies. Also Double Reversible Caps, Ladies' 
Caps and Scarfs, Brushed. Men's Scarfs, Brushed and Un-Brushed. We 
have added several new attractive lines this year, both in Men's, Ladies', 
and Boys'. Some of them light weight. All with the superior VISOR finish. 
One of our representatives will call early in the season. Don't place your 
order until you have seen our complete line. Ask to see our New Coat 
Sweater called DUROTEX. We now cover all of Canada. 

Visor Knitting Company, Limited 

Niagara Falls, Ontario 

Factories also at Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11:| I l!!!l 1:1:1 IJil 1 1 1 1 1 1:1 1 1 1 |!H I hill I III 1 1! 



CLIFT & GOODRICH, Inc. 



328-330 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 



& 



Hosiery 
Bathing Suits 
Knit Underwear 
Nainsook Underwear 
Men's Cotton Sweaters 



Commission 
Merchants 

: : to the : : 

Jobbing Trade 
Exclusively 



-iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriinnii 



iniiiii 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



L23 




These Stockings Increase Your Profits 



THREE EIGHTIES" 
Stockings for women en- 
joy a greater prestige and sale 
than any other one style of 
hosiery in Canada. 

The comfort, durability, and 
economy of "Three Eighties" 
have built their reputation and 
make them a really consistent 
seller. 

"Three Eighties" are a seamless 



cotton hose with three-ply heels and 
toes to give added strength and save 
darning. 

For misses as* well as women — 
sizes 4^2 to 8 M> 8 M to 10. Colors 
Black, Tan, and White. Attractively 
boxed in dozens. 

The demand for "Three Eighties" 
is steadily increasing. 

If not already in stock, your 
wholesaler can supply you. 



Hosiery 
\J Women 

The Chipman-Holton Knitting Company, Limited, Hamilton, Ontario 




Twelve pairs of perfect 
hose in every box 



Mills at Hamilton and Welland, Ont. 






K N ITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 



The Ballantyne 

is now being Sho 




The New Ballantyne Monkey Blouse 



Monkey Blouses 

Shawlettes 

Smocks 



Girls' Balkans 
Knitted Coats 
Mufflers 



LIST OF 

Cap and Muffler Sets 

Toques 

Tarns 



R. M. BALLANTYNE, LIMI 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



125 



Range for 1921 

wn to the Trade 



\X/"ERE styles in knitted garments staple; that is, if they 
showed little or no variation from year to year, Ballantyne 
Knitted Wear would occupy a high place in public regard because 
of their superior finish and all-round dependable quality. 

But style is a big feature in knitted garments ; it is what deter- 
mines their popularity — and it is in style that Ballantyne gar- 
ments excel. 

The Ballantyne range for 192 1 is now ready to be shown to the 
trade. With Ballantyne staple lines you are all familiar — Bal- 
lantyne Gloves, Hosiery, Boys' Jerseys, the Ballantyne Glove 
(Scotch Knit), etc.; but in the range of novelties, here is where 
you at once see the trade-building possibilities of Ballantyne 
Knitted Goods. 

Ballantyne Monkey Blouses, for instance; here are several new 
style ideas that Ballantyne dealers will be first in displaying to 
their customers — and the Ballantyne Novelty Coats, Smocks, 
Balkans and Shawlettes — there will be several 192 1 style hits 
among these. They have got "zip." 

Then, of course, merchants will want their regular supply of Bal- 
lantyne Boys' Jerseys, the Ballantyne Glove (Scotch Knit) and 
Ballantyne Hosiery. These are lines for which there is no possible 
substitute, once Ballantyne quality has been tested. 

When the Ballantyne representative calls on you, he will submit 
the complete 192 1 range for your inspection. You will find in it 
both the staple goods and enticing novelties you need to build 
up your stock and act as a tonic for your business. 



PRODUCTS 

Caps Hosiery 

Mitts Men's and Boys' Jerseys 

Gloves Children's Suits 


Young Men's Pullovers 
The Ballantyne Glove 
(Scotch Knit) 



TED, STRATFORD, CANADA 






K \ 1 TT E-D GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 




Prized By Dealer 
And Customer Alike 

T TNDERWEAR— to fulfil its mission 
^ and bring satisfaction to both 
dealer and consumer — should be of last- 
ing satisfaction to the first, and pro- 
ductive of ample profits for the second. 

Dealers everywhere are learning that 
Atlantic Underwear admirably fills 
both these requirements. 

Sold in five different weights and 
qualities. Each line is guaranteed 
to be the best value of its class. 




UNSHRINKABLE 

The Underwear 
{hat Overyears 

ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR, Limited 
MONCTON - - N.B. 



28 




Customer-Satisfaction 

— that's what you are after, isn't it? 

That's what brings repeats — that's what makes 
your customers refer others to your store — 
that's what makes the reputation of your store 
solid! 

Because we want your customers for OUR 
customers, we have done all in our power to 
ensure that 



B 



urritt s 



SiikH 



osiery 



will brin& you that customer-satisfaction. 

COLORS 

White, Black, Navy, Tan, Cordovan, 

Grey, Beaver, Champagne. 

Also a fine line of Burritt Lisle Hosiery. 

All Silk and Lisle Hosiery attractively ■ 

boxed. 



A. Burritt y Co. 

Mitchell, Ont. 

Established 1875 
Manufacture! s of Sweaters, Pure Camel Hair Men's Seamless 
Gloves, Pullovers,, Toques, Boys' and Men's Ribbed Wor- 
sted Hosiery. | 

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Dry <!oods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



12" 




DC 



DCZIC 



n 



n 



An Exclusive Burritt Number 




SMART, becoming Sweater 
Coat in fine white wool, 
with contrasting beading of 
yellow wool, and special 
"feather" finish on long tuxedo 
collar and cuffs. 

This "feather" trimming 
has a novel crinkled appear- 
ance which dampness, steam, 
heat, or any other condition 
cannot affect— a special Burritt 
feature. 




Our Travellers are now on the way to you 

This is* but one of many interesting Burritt 
lines which they are prepared to show you. 

Burritt Sweaters are worth seeing! 

A. BURRITT & CO. 

Mitchell, Ont. 

Established 1875 

Manufacturers of Sweaters, Pure Camel Hair Men's Seamless Gloves, 
Pullovers, Toques, Boys' and Men's Ribbed Worsted Hosiery. 




DC 



Dae 



DC 




128 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Gq is Review 



Apply the 



u 



Test of Elimination 

In selecting your 
Spring Jersey stock. 



» 



s 



Reduce duplication — 
concentrate on the line that 
means the most satisfaction 
to your customers and the 
greatest prestige for your store! 

Our Jerseys will turn the trick — try them ! 

FOR MEN and BOYS 

Children's Knitted Suits in plain colors. 
Spring range now in hands of our Travellers. 

ALL WOOL 

Snug-fitting Fast colors Well finished 

Attractive Combinations Heathers 

Shoulder-fastening or Pullovers 

JERSEY'S LIMITED 



455 King St. W. 



Toronto 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



129 




130 



K N I T T K D GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 



\31 



PERRIN'S 

"Ace of Clubs" 




PERRIN KAYSER CO., LIMITED 

Sommer Building, Montreal 



DRY HOODS REVIEW 



DEPARTMENT "AI" 

Dress Ginghams 

Canadian and Imported 

Apron Ginghams 

SHIRTINGS OXFORD 

Steel Clad Galateas 

NURSES' CLOTH 

White and Striped and Fancy 

Flannelettes 

JVe particularly wish to draw your 
attention to our fine 

KREMLA AND WOOL TAFFETA 

DEPARTMENT "AC" 

See our special Floral Lines in White 
Cottons, Sheetings and Pillow Cottons, 
soft and smooth as the petals of a rose. 

P.S. and N.B. and again N.B. 

Buy your Cotton Goods NOW as an advance 
is positively going to take place shortly 

GREENSHIELDS LIMITED 

Everything in Dry Goods 

VICTORIA SQUARE MONTREAL 




Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 






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HOBOEy 




Protect yourself — 

CONCENTRATE! 

The wisdom of concentrating on one line of unquestioned 
and well-known quality is being brought home to Merchants 
everywhere at this time. 

Why carry an unnecessary variety of Makes of Underwear 
when One Absolutely Reliable line will meet every taste and 
every demand ? 

HARVEY garments are made of the finest quality of combed 
Sea Island and Australasian Wool, and finished with an 
actual tailored effect. 

There are so many Special features of the HARVEY range 
that they can only be fully appreciated on inspection of the 
different numbers. 



The HARVEY range will meet your needs — faithfully 

CONCENTRATE ON IT! 



\nd well 



H 



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Knitting Co 

Limited 
Woodstock - Ontario 



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134 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 




1921 Range now being shown by our representatives: 

The Williams-Trow Knitting Co., Limited, Stratford, Ontario 



1/ni Goods R< i-ii a 



KNITTED GOODS 



135 



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Good Judgment 

is required in buying for this year 



Canadians are over their spasm of extravagance and 
now are buying with their old time care and thought. 

Merchants must buy only those goods that the public 
want — they cannot afford to have goods lying on their 
shelves. 



The secret of good merchandising is to keep your money moving — 
don't have any idle stock — handle only goods that are active. 

Even in the dullest times people insist on wearing 



t< 



M 



CEETEE 

THE PURE WOOL 

UNDERCLOTHING 

THAT WILL NOT SHRINK 

"The woollen underwear without the itch" 



The famous sheep trade-mark is known from Halifax 
to Vancouver as a result of our many years of con- 
sistent advertising. "Ceetee"' is the only underwear 
made in Canada that is reinforced at all wearing 
parts. 

Worn by the best people 
Sold by the best dealers 



Wait till our traveller shows you samples 




Garment 
before ordering your season supply. 



MANUFACTURED 
ONLY BY 




of Gait 



®5K 



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13< 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Revv w 




HOSIERY. 



Circle - Bar Hosiery 

in Cashmere for Fall 1921 

SHORTLY our representatives will be showing lines of Circle-Bar 
Cashmere Hosiery for Fall, 1921. 

The values are so much better than we have been able to offer 
for the past three years that your customers will be glad to buy them. 
Quality is the best and the assortment of styles and colors has been 
increased. 

Our Owen Sound Mill is now running (where we specialize on men's 
lines exclusively) and we will be in a position to give you better sen-ice 
than heretofore. 



Will also show Silk Lines for delivery 
up to June 30, 1921 



Mills at Kincardine' 

and 

Owen Sound 



The Circle -Bar Knitting Co., Limited 

Head Office : KINCARDINE, Ont. 



-i £MMi^M ^iLL»ll<i^r^.zr^^^ WWmM- WMmM2mU^MWW-?WMM. 




Universal Service 

^URING the years of War Time Prosperity, when honest 
**J and intelligent service was at a premium, the Universal 
Knitting Company Limited succeeded in building up among 
its customers a reputation for excellence in these attributes. 

To-day we are more than ever prepared and determined to 
maintain our high standard of perfection in Knitted Garments. 

Our travellers now have their new 1921 samples and are at 
your service. We rely upon you for your hearty co-operation. 

THE UNIVERSAL KNITTING COMPANY LIMITED 



303 Pender Street West 



Vancouver, B.C 



Makers of Canada's Finest Knitwear 



Dm floods h'c.i'ii ir 



KNITTED GOODS 



i:;" 



Investigate the Quality of 
the Goods You Sell 

You arc vitally interested in the quality of the 
goods vim -ell. because your customers arc interested 
in quality. 

As regards infants' and children's woollen garments, 
you can't get better quality than 

PRISCILLA QUALITY 

VYe are constantly improving the quality of our goods, with improve- 
ment- in our facilities for manufacture and in the quality of raw material 
obtainable. Priscilla Quality "Woollens are better to-day than they were 
a year ago. 

To make sure of PRISCILLA QUALITY, see that 
the woollens you stock come from our factory 

HENRY DAVIS & CO., Limited, 259 spadina Ave., TORONTO 




Maple Leaf pure wool Hosiery 




The well-known 

brand your 

customers will 

ask for 

"Made up to a standard— 
not down to a price." 




MARK 



MADE BY 
fx'SOOERICH KNITTING C» 



Made in 
Canada 



THE GODERICH KNITTING CO., LTD. 

Goderich, Ont. 




Sizes 8 
8K>&9 



I doz. pair to the box 



Nurses' Cuffs- 

A sturdy article 
A steady seller 

Used in Hospitals, 
Homes and Offices 

Send for an assortment 



One grade only 

and One price 

--Both the BEST possible! 

That's the invariable standard of 

M^ COLLARS 



THE PARSONS & PARSONS CANADIAN COMPANY 

HAMILTON, CANADA 



138 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 



Correcting a Mistake 

WHICH OCCURRED IN 
DECEMBER ADVERTISEMENT 

of 

Winsome Maid Hosiery 



An error, very misleading to our patrons, occurred in 
the December Winsome Maid Hosiery advertisement 
in this journal. It was in reference to a new line of 
heather hosiery which we have recently introduced. 

To simplify the ordering of this new line for dealers, 
we were referring to it as "OUR NEW NUMBER 400 
LINE'" (each of our lines having a distinguishing 
number). Unfortunately through misinterpreting the 
number sign (#) for the dollar sign ($), it appeared 
incorrectly in print as "OUR NEW $4.00 LINE." 

This magazine generously offered to correct the error 
(for which they were not responsible) here, in order to 
let readers understand that the "400" had nothing to do 
with price. Information about this new line of hosiery 
will be found in another page advertisement of Win- 
some Maid Silk Hosiery in this issue. 



ALLEN SILK MILLS LIMITED 

43 Davies Avenue 
TORONTO 



/>/•>/ Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



]:;!» 



One thing certain! 



Buttons are still being worn 

and they always will be! 

Arc you treating your button, 
department jusi as sort of an 
accessory station, or are you 
making your button assortment 
an INSPIRATION to the use 
of MORE buttons 9 

Your button department is a 
steady, all-yeay-round propo- 
sition. An attractive assort- 
ment at all times increases 
dividends from this corner of 
your store. 

Have yon seen our new Spring 
range? 



The Ontario Button Co. 

Limited 



Kitchener, Ont. 




'IIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIini'llMt'r 

Immediate 

Delivery — | 
/ — Lower Prices 
HORROCKSES 

COTTONS J 

Prompt shipment can be made from e 
stock, or for import. 

If you are not on mailing list, please = 

write. = 

JOHN E RITCHIE 

Dry Goods Commission Agent 
591 St. Catherine St West, MONTREAL I 

Branches: = 

U Wellington St. W. 543 Granville St. 29 Minshull St. | 
Toronto. Vancouver Manchester. Eng. 

'i:!lllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIr 



IMPORTERS and MANUFACTURERS 

Art Needlework and Fancy Goods 

"Peri-Lusta" "Crystal" 

Mercerized Cottons Artificial Silk 

Embroidery Materials 

Fancy Linens and Piece Goods 

MADEIRA HAND EMBROIDERED 
LINENS and HANDKERCHIEFS 

Campbell, Metzger & Jacobson 

^32-938 Broadway New York Cor. 22nd St. 

Canadian Showroom and Factory: 

Bay and Wellington Sts., - Toronto, Canada 




The Mark of Fine Merchandise 



"Viyella" 

"A z a" 
"Clydella" 

Unshrinkable Flannels 



Your particular attention is 
directed to our circular letter 
of December 27th, 1920. 



» 



WM. HOLLINS & CO., LTD. 

(of London , England) 

62 Front Street W., Toronto 
45 E. 17th Street, New York 



140 



n 1; v i; oons rkv i k w 



What Are You Doing 

to Meet the New 

Conditions ? 



When war gave place to business, the country's trade was stabilized and 

strengthened by far-sighted merchants, wholesalers and manufacturers who 

■carried on" and courageously made the most of conditions as they appeared. 

To-day— 

The events of the past should teach us to look ahead. If the best policy in 1918 
was to "carry on" — it is more so to-day to go forward — to build business sanely 
and thoroughly. 

Your merchants are waiting for any sign that will give a hint of your policy 
--if you mark time. they, too, will mark time — if you go forward, they will 
go with you. 

From all sides comes increasing evidence of this supreme importance of dealer 
co-operation. The merchant to-day is waiting for a word from you of your 
policy, and he will do his part to recreate consumer-demand and start the 
stream of goods once more moving across the counter. 

Tell your merchant in straightforward, business-like talks in the business 
newspaper he is reading, what you have to offer — your plans for the year. 
Never was time more opportune, not only for the expansion of trade, but to 
establish thorough co-operation with the merchant who sells your goods. 

Business can be made good. Business can always be good when it is gone after 
in the right way — your dealers know only what you tell them about your 1921 
plans. They cannot be expected to share your enthusiasm unless they are as 
familiar with it as you. 

The merchant's interests are your interests. Take him into your confidence, 
give him the facts — tell him in regular announcements in his business paper 
what you are doing to stabilize business. 

You can hold his enthusiasm by regular announcements in his business news- 
paper. To-day, more than ever, he is reading the merchandising plans in 
the advertising pages — the marketing ideas and methods and news in the 
editorial pages — for both are focused directly on the merchant's vital problems. 

We are interviewing hundreds of merchants every week in all parts of Canada, 
and the best suggestion we can make is to "CARRY ON." 



If 



The MacLean Publishing Company, Limited 

Publishers of the following specialized Business Newspapers: 



The Financial Post 
Bookseller & Stationer 
Canadian Grocer 
Dry Goods Review 

Druggists' Weekly 



Hardware & Metal 
Men's Wear Review 
Sanitary Engineer 



J>r;/ (ioods Re 



rii u 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



1 II 



"J ulian Sale" Fine Leather Goods. 

Our Travellers Will 
Soon Be On the Move 




About the end of the month our travellers will start away on their spring trips 
with a most complete range of samples of the "Julian Sale" make Leather 
Goods and Novelties. Never have we had bigger and better lines to present to 
the trade, and the values are amongst the best we have ever offered. "Julian 
Sale" goods, you must know by experience, will give a quality touch and added 
attractiveness to any man's stock, and we can well afford to emphasize the fact 
in sending our representatives on their new season's sorting trips. 

Amongst the new lines there are many novel and attractive specials, includ- 
ing the Vanity Boxes, in a very varied "style" assortment in leathers, colors and 
fittings. The Lucille Bag, which has been so popular, is bound to be more so, 
and our line will help make it so. Silk Moire Bags may more than ever be 
counted amongst the "best sellers." The "Julian Sale" range of these unique 

and novel hand bags present 
a fine showing. And strap- 
handle purses and other staple 
lines are unusually well repre- 
sented. 

Our Sample Rooms 

The latch string is always on 
the outside to the trade, and 
we invite you to feel free to 
make the best use of the rooms 
when you visit the city. Make 
them your headquarters, and 
welcome. 

The Julian Sale Leather Goods Company, Limited 

Wholesale — Factory — Offices and Sample Rooms: 
600 King Street West, Toronto. 





142 



Dry Goods Review 



Colors Taboo in Spring Neckwear 

Fashion Limits Brighter Shades to Silk Novelties of French Origin — Regular Lines in Neck 
Fixings Adhere Strictly to White and Cream — Nets, Organdies and Laces are 

Sponsored — Ribbons. 



THE vogue for colored neckwear is 
on the wane. Deep cream and 
frothy white, or white trimmed 
with the merest touch of rose, lavender 
yellow or blue have ousted the all-pink, 
all-blue, and all-orchid organdie models 
of last Fall. There is a strong rivalry 
between nets and organdies in all lines 
and in both cream and white models. 
Considerable Swiss neckwear is being 
imported and the handwork represented 
in many delightful little collars will 
prove a delight. One line seen this 
month just as it was being opened and 
put into stock was remarked for its 
absolute simplicity. Four hand-sewn 
tucks decorated the Peter Pan collar in 
pure white organdie. These dainty 
models will retail at the astonishingly 
low price of 50 cents. The workman- 
ship is beautiful and the absence of lace 
or embroidery renders these smart little 
"tailleur" collars quite distinctive from 
the machine made models with machine 
applied finishings which have been seen 
for so long. 

Prices 

One of the most interesting features 
of Spring neckwear is the price. On 
every side the claim that "prices aren't 
really lower" can be challenged by the 
manufacturers of neckwear, for there is 
no doubt whatever that dainty lines of 
substantial manufacture are available at 
lower prices than were paid last year. 
The most exquisite collar and vestee sets 
in organdie with dainty embroidery and 
lace insets such as shown in the accom- 
panying neckwear illustration will: be 
sold over the counter at the modest fig- 
ure of $2.50. Charming net conceits of 
similar design or garnished with tiny 
lace edgings, pretty little frills and rows 
of pin tucks, not to mention smart little 
finishing touches in ribbon bows or but- 
ton, will also retail close to this figure. 
White and ecru also reign in these sets. 

Vestee sets are due for another very 
good season, and complete sets are in 
greater demand than ever. France has 
he seal of approval once more on 
the high neck line and the throat fast- 
ened models in cloth have a rival in the 
high throated gilet of net or organdie. 
These high collared vestees are being 
fashioned of sheer fabrics to be warn 
with the cloth costume or the one-piece 
frock cut out in a variety of outlines in 
the front. Sometimes the Bodice reveals 
a low curved line or a deep delta and in 
this case the Frenchwoman adds to her 
costume a smart vestee and high collar 
of some sheer fabric with excellent 
effect. 



Vagaries of New Models 

Sometimes a compromise is made, and 
the collar which starts out with "high" 
intentions changes its mind and favors 
spreading revers in front, which reveal 
the bare throat. Frequently a slender 
black ribbon crosses the throat and fast- 
ens to the collar's edge. High roll ef- 
fects at the back, and even frills, are 
encouraged. Whole cascades of frills 
garnish the fronts of some of the vestees 
in jabot fashion and smart effects are 
also achieved by fetching manipulations 
of narrow gros grain faille and moire 
ribbon. 

Claims Many Adherents 

The round collar will have many ad- 
mirers, for after all the great majority 
of women will not accede to the adop- 
tion, even for a brief spell around 
Easter, of the high neck. Therefore she 
relies upon the variety provided in 
models for the low neck line costume, 
and the neckwear department will 
achieve results by carrying an excellent 
assortment of all the novelties present- 
ed. There will be an added attraction 
in the round collar for models such as 
the prettily designed lace collar shown 
will retail at $1.00 each. 

Trim little tailored organdie sets of 
collar and cuffs will sell for 75 cents and 
up to the consumer and besides the all 
white or all cream models with small 
medallion insets will be shown strictly 



untrimmed organdie sets finished with 
narrow black, orchid, pink or blue bor- 
ders, of not more than an eighth of an 
inch in width. 

Among High Price Novelties 

The Spring neckwear lines also in- 
clude smart pique and crash cotton nov- 
elties and among the exclusive models 
much attention is given to crepe silk 
conceits in an odd range of colors. All 
kinds of crepe silk materials are being 
sponsored by Paris, and naturally there 
are some charming models coming to 
the fore in Canton crepe and other lovely 
weaves — sometimes richly embroidered, 
sometimes heavily brocaded and some- 
times with no trimming at all save a 
saucy bow, a row of buttons or self- 
applied bands. These high-priced lines 
for the exclusive trade, however, corner 
the color card, and as far as regular 
lines are concerned they are limited to 
cream and white, with an occasional 
binding in a pastel shade permitted. 

Ribbons 

Ribbons have reason to flaunt their 
pretty colors this Spring. Dame Fashion 
has placed them on the pinnacle of popu- 
larity and from the point of view of 
style they are to figure most prominent- 
ly in the season just ahead. 

Drawn from the splendid lines being 
(Continued on page 144) 




Dainty Neckwear Models 



1. White embroidered organdie collar and vestee displaying insets of point 
venise. 2. Round collar in ecru, point "venise and organdie. 3. Tailored organdie 
tuxedo, double thickness, with cut-out sections inset with embroidered motifs. — 
Courtesy Sterling Lace & Norelty Co., Toronto. 



Dr>/ Goods Review 



143 



Colored 'Kerchiefs Continue In Vogue 

Irish and Swiss Manufacturers Draw Inspirations From Nursery Books for Kiddies' De- 
signs, While the Most Artistic Color Effects Are Carried Out in the New "Mascot" 
Handkerchiefs, which Are to be Among the Leading Spring Novelties. 



THE season just ended has brought 
to pass some astonishing changes 
in the unusually varied range of 
handkerchief lines. Formerly the ac- 
cepted Christmas range was the all 
white article, lace trimmed or embroid- 
ered, initialled or plainly hemstitched 
fine linen, but not so during the latter 
part of 1920. All the large department 
stores report an unprecedented demand 
for colored handkerchiefs, a demand never 
before anticipated at this season and 
never so impossible to supply. Morgan's, 
of Montreal, offered some weeks before 
Christmas a lot of over 1,600 boxes of 
handkerchiefs in half dozens in vivid col- 
ors and within ten days every handker- 
chief was gone and innumerable calls 
came from customers for more of the 
same. Other stores also experienced a 
similar demand for a line of goods typi- 
cally and naturally adapted to Spring 
and Summer selling. The opinion of the 
buyers in the large cities is unanimously 
agreed that the colored handkerchief 
has come to stay, especially in the fine 
grades of linen, and they record a cor- 
responding decrease in the sales of the 
conventional all-white line. 

In smaller centres the demand is said 
to be the other way, towards conserva- 
tive and staple lines, but the manufac- 
turers, both Irish and Swiss, are anti- 
cipating any tendency towards curtailed 
buying by putting forth a more attrac- 
tive range of samples for 1921 than ever. 

A representative of Dry Goods Review 
was informed by one of the largest Can- 
adian handkerchief houses, that the 
range for 1921 from the best Irish mak- 
ers exemplifies the highest standards of 
artistic achievement. Fabrics are once 
more of sheerest, purest quality, dyes 
are guaranteed perfect and designs . and 
patterns almost unbelievably different 
and artistic. The prices also are grad 
ually lessening, although for present 
selling any reduction in raw materials 
is unfortunately offset by the rise in 
labor costs. Supplies just now are un- 
usually large and the assortments com- 
plete, but as soon as the expected entry 
of American buyers into the market 
occurs, the situation will change ma- 
terially. 

Irish handkerchiefs, both of fine lawns 
and linens, present many interesting 
novelties for the coming year. Many 
of the samples have only just been opened 
up and were destined for Christmas, 
1921, selling, therefore Dry Goods Re- 
view is unusually fortunate in being able 
to present some of the best examples. 

In men's handkerchiefs, there is a 
strong tendency shown in favor of the 
woven cross-barred effect with hand 
embroidered initials in block letters in 




The Newest Handkerchiefs 



1. Colored handkerchief in blue, green and white, in dainty, sprigged lawn. (2) 
Child's handkerchief featuring artistic picturization in dull blue. (3) Man's handker- 
chief of fine lawn, neatly bordered in blue with hand-embroidered initials. (4) Novelty 
mascot handkerchief of emerald green and yellow. — Manufactured by Douglas & 
Green, of Belfast. Handkerchiefs shown by courtesy of Wallace & Wallace, Montreal. 



colors. Single, double and multiple line 
borders and hems in solid colors such as 
mauve, fawn, blue and green are shown 
for general use in the usual sizes, and 
the range of designs is unlimited. 

In ladies' novelty lines the newest 
thing is what may be described as the 
"mascot" handkerchief, which features a 
novel use of dark colors, such as navy 
blue solid ground with rose colored cor- 
ner insets enclosing a small black pig, or 
else an emerald green centre with a yel- 
low "starlit sky" border, further embel- 
lished by owls silhouetted against a full 
moon. A mauve and yellow creation fea- 
tures some goldfish very realistically, 
and a cretonne-like ground of black with 
a small colored floral all over pattern, 
quaintly sets off the portraits of four 
black cats. The northern lights and a 
polar bear are also carried out in blue 
and black in futuristic design on another 
bizarre novelty, which is nevertheless 
both artistic and colorful. 

Of a different type, yet equally artis- 
tic and dainty, are the lines which por- 
tray charmingly drawn girls' figures of 



a style resembling the early Victorian. 
One lovely example is of lavender lawn, 
sprigged with tiny roses, with a quaintly 
etched figure in crinoline occupynig one 
corner. A dull blue creation, centred 
with a white oval, shows two figures in 
pretty costumes of two colors. A fea- 
ture of these handkerchiefs is that the 
artist who executed the designs has sign- 
ed them as though a portrait from life. 

Still other novelties are the all black 
handkei'chief which shows a wreath of 
pink roses in its centre, or the navy blue 
ground on which is scattered conven- 
tional futurist motifs in henna color. 

But the "last word" has truly been 
said when it comes to children's hand- 
kerchiefs and here art joins hands with 
practical purpose and achieves the 
"fairy tale" handkerchief. What hap- 
piness these marvellous reproductions of 
Jack and the Beanstalk, Cinderella, 
Puss in Boots, the Babes in the Wood, 
and the Pied Piper of Hamelin will 
bring! Truly, both in execution and de- 
sign, has the perfection of imagery been 
reached. 



1 14 



DK E ss a Or ESS OR 1 ES 



Dry Goods Review 



NOVELTIES SHOWN IN DAINTY 
DAINTY LINGERIE 
I inued from page L21 

Underskirts are often trimmed with a 
fine accordion pleated flounce of georg- 
ette or crepe de Chine, which is adorably 
pretty under the new dance frocks but 
there is also much fine lace used, and 
one especially pretty conceit was a 
flounce of bands of Valenciennes inser- 
tion underneath which, in alternate rows, 
weie threaded pale blue ribbons, tied 
here and there in soft knots. In fact, the 
knot of ribbon is used everywhere. 

Bloomers are shown more than ever 
in silk and satin, with elastic fitted 
knees, either hemstitched or plain at the 
hems, or even with the addition of wide 
frills of rich lace. Here again, colorful 
sprays of flowers are worked with 
charming effect, although destined to 
bloom unseen. Lace insertions are al?o 
used above the knee and in the finer filet 
patterns are unusually effective. 

The envelope chemise still holds the 
field of popularity and features many 
clusters of fine hand run tucks at the 
waist-line besides delicate festoons of 
wash ribbons. Much emphasis is placed 
upon plain folds of contrasting georg- 
ette as a finish and also geometrical de- 
signs with a double thickness of the 
material outlined with hemstitching is 
an unusual but effective finish. Drawn 
work will be shown on crepe de Chine, 
especially in the pale shades of orchid, 
with touches of black embroidery. 

Novel Designs 

Nightgowns show a tendency to al- 
low more fullness than is usual, and this 
feature is noticeable in all classes o + ' 
undergarment. The wearing qualities 
will thereby be greatly enhanced. Much 
tucking and simple trimming is employ- 
ed, with little emphasis upon lace as a 
decoration. Several new ideas were no- 
ticed, among which was the slipover 
effect made of a straight length of 
crepe de Chine, simply scalloped at neck 
and sleeve edges and girdled by a soft 
girdle of two toned crepe. This model 
was laced at the opening in front with 
a silk cord. 

Another exquisite conceit was sleeve- 
less and featured a bow knot of inset 
filet lace in front; a camisole and chem- 
ise to match were also shown. The pre- 
ference for dainty pyjamas is also re- 
cognized, and one set noticed was of pink 
China silk trimmed with white, in two 
piece effect, the jacket beng a slipover. 

The height of perfection in lingerie is 
truly reached in an imported model of 
flesh georgette, made in Empire effect 
with narrow ruffles of cream net edg- 
ing the square neck, armholes and bot- 
tom edjre. A crepe de Chine nightgown 
had its tiny Empire waist entirely made 
of real filet lace, and also featured the 
new square neckline. 

A whole volume could be written 
about the new negligees shown for 1921, 
and all the delicate pastel colorings find 



interpretation in the showrooms of Can- 
adian makers this season. Since every 
boudoir robe is now accompanied by 
matching or contrasting underslip, the 
discriminating buyer now realizes that 
the negligee is a thing of importance. 
One of the most desirable models noticed 
was of white charmeuse, hanging ab- 
solutely straight from bust to hem. The 
edges are inset all round with fine thread 
lace, and a dainty ribbon knot closes the 
fronts. Still another model is of flesh 
georgette, accordion pleated and girdled 
with two toned satin ribbon. It is sleeve- 
less save for the ruffles of lace which 
edge the armholes. 

Pale blue crepe de Chine, softly knife- 
pleated with over jacket of the same, 
edged with filet lace and caught with 
heavy balls of silk at the pointed sleeve 
ends, or another of palest yellow georg- 
ette, delicately embroidered in mauve 
with knots of mauve ribbons here and 
there, were also noticed. 

Accessories 

That the boudoir cap is not yet extinct, 
and frequently accompanies these gar- 
ments is proved by a visit to the work- 
rooms of the manufacturers. One novel 
idea was a cap of rose corded ribbon 
adorned with lace and flowers, which 
exactly matched its tea gown negligee 
of rose crepe de Chine. The ribbon was 
woven to form the crown, with a deep 
puff of cream lace against the lace. 

In talking of negligees, it is permiss- 
ible to add that the most up-to-date de- 
partments are featuring satin or lace 
mules to accompany these diaphanous 
garments. These mules are nothing- 
more or less than puffs of silk or satin 
with lacy rosettes upon the toe, or a 
rosebud or two. 

The vogue for silk lingerie has taken 
an unprecedented hold upon Paris this 
season, and in Paris the original negligee 
was evolved which has been the inspira- 
tion of so many designers to imitate. 
The garment "de luxe" as it is found 
over there might easily be mistaken for 
an evening gown, so elaborately is it 
fashioned. At any rate, it is a far cry 
to the old-time kimona, formerly so es- 
sential a part of the feminine wardrobe. 



COLORS TABOO IN SPRING 
NECKWEAR 

Continued from page 142 

manufactured on this side, and from the 
French and Swiss • houses famed • for 
artistry and originality the range this 
Spring is wide and decidedly interesting. 
Unfortunately, however, very few orders 
are finding their way to European mar- 
kets, and from French manufacturing 
centres come numerous reports of mills 
closing down for the lack of orders to 
keep the workers employed. Ribbon 
manufacturers on this side are making 
good their opportunities, and although 
the exquisite products of the French 
centres cannot be copied, their vogue is 
being to some extent succeeded by that 



of more popular priced ribbons which 
can be obtained at more attractive 
prices by a public that is looking for 
more reasonably priced lines in all 
classes of goods. 

For Milady's Hat 

Spring millinery will display a va- 
riety of pretty ribbons both narrow and 
wide. Many of the imported creations,, 
after which the chapeaux for the open- 
ings are being modelled, feature all rib- 
bon trimmings and shiny effects are- 
still very prominent in dark shades, grey 
and black. Wide satin cire is featured. 
Shot effects in taffeta are in demand,, 
also double-faced ribbons in satin, moire, 
gros grain and faille. Metal picot edges, 
are seen on narrow gros grains. 

Sashes, which have acquired a new 
popularity with the fad for georgettes,, 
crepe de Chines and other soft drapey 
silks and cottons, have necessitated ad- 
ditional efforts for good novelty effects 
in wider ribbons, and some beautiful 
lines in faille and rich brocades are ap- 
pearing. Among the French offerings 
are exquisite Paisley effects and plaid 
shot taffetas, satin striped and checked 
novelties and ribbons striped with cello- 
phane. 

Dainty Lingerie Ribbons 

Lingerie ribbons are unusually pretty 
in many widths and there is a very 
heavy demand for all widths in satin and 
silk lines that will launder. In colors, 
pimento red, several interesting shades 
of blue — one very close to jade but with 
an equal hint of turquoise — orchid, yel- 
low and empire green are sponsored. 
Grey, black and white are prominently 
featured for a variety of uses. 



French Lingerie 
Claims a Crepe 

All Its Own 

There is a new fabric for lingerie in 
France, which is named "crepe turco," 
and resembles the heaviest quality of 
chiffon with a slight crepe finish. This 
novelty material was introduced by Lan- 
vin, who uses it extensively for her un- 
derwear models this season. A novel 
idea of hers is the use of fine black Chan- 
tilly lace combined with white voile for 
underwear to wear with black evening 
gowns. 

The other French houses are also out- 
doing themselves in novelties of this 
description, such as vivid red nightgowns 
with pleats in back and front, with neck 
and sleeve frills embroidered in black 
and white scalloping, and also sets of 
brown voile lingerie with- inserts of wide 
cream lace. The French fashion is to 
have the shoulder straps' of finest flesh 
colored tulle which is practically in- 
visible. 

A pink chiffon chemise from the 
Maison Jenny has shoulder straps of 
Continued on page 151 



/'/■// Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



145 




ibbons 



ONLY *. 



to be 



had in Ribbons 




WE ARE THE RIBBON 
HOUSE OF CANADA 




We sell nothing but Ribbons 



/^\UR stock is particularly 
well assorted in all 
standard lines. 



Our prices have been re- 
duced to meet all reductions 
in foreign markets. 

You Can Always Depend on Us. 

Walter H. Barry & Company 

The Specialty Ribbon House of Canada 

6 St. Helen Street -- MONTREAL, QUE. 



WINNIPEG BRANCH: CANADA BLDG. 



146 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 





BUY 
SAFELY 




TO GLOVE AND HOSIERY RETAILERS 

WE RETURN OUR THANKS for your steady patronage during the year 
1920, and in full appreciation of your confidence we advise you not to delay 
the placing of your orders for Spring and Fall. 

THE PRESENT REACTIONARY SLUMP will not last. A renewed demand 
is overdue, and, we believe, imminent. 

MANUFACTURERS WILL NOT be able to supply merchandise at a mo- 
ment's notice. 

THE FINE LEATHER MARKET has not weakened, and is not likely to do 
so, owing to the shortage of skins, and mam- yea rs will elapse before pre-war 
quantities are again available. 

WOOL SALES REVEAL that the better grades are still being sold upon a 
rising market. 

DO NOT HESITATE to protect yourself. If any easement should take place, 
goods will be charged to you at current prices ruling at time of shipment. 

OUR REPRESENTATIVE will call upon you shortly. Look over his ranges of 

DENT'S GLOVES 

For 200 Years the World's Leading Line 

AND 

TRIDENT HOSIERY 

Which "Fits Like a Glove" 

YOUR CUSTOMERS WHO KNOW DENT BRAND GLOVES 
WILL BE ^ANXIOUS TO TRY DENT BRAND HOSIERY 

Place your stocks prominently before them, they 
want goods famous the world over for their 

QUALITY, STYLE AND FINISH 

DENT ALLCROFT & CO. (Canada) Limited 

MONTREAL 



Drtt Hoods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



147 






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THE TUXEDO 



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vogue 
for the fiofrular 

Tuxedo Sweater Coat, 

Dress 

and Suit Coat 

There ls^unlimited opportunity 
for diversity of styles in this 
line, and we are showing an in- 
teresting variety of distinctive 
effects that mark PHOENIX 
TUXEDOS apart from the 
ordinary Tuxedo. 

No. 3496 — The number illustrated is of 
Flemish Lace in Ocher shade. 



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1 




"Better JXeckwear" for the "Better Stores 



Other lines now showing — strong 
sellers and authentic heralds of 
the Spring demand — 

Lace V estings 

and Bandings 

Lace V estees 

- short lengths - 

Tuxedo Epingle Cord 

and Pique 



Send for sample 



assortment 



Prom fit 'Delivery 

Phoenix 

Novelry 

Company 



154 Pearl Street 

TORONTO 



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ACT K S s O R I E S 



/>/■// Goods Review 



Ladies' Hand Bags 
and Purses 

M 

1921 Spring Season 

OUR Salesmen will start out 
around February 1st to show 
our New Lines for the Spring 
Season, and we earnestly request 
you to await their coming before 
placing your orders. 

We have pride in stating that our 
lines for this year will be far ahead 
of anything we have so far pro- 
duced both in STYLE and VALUE, 
and will stand comparison with 
the best imported merchandise. 

Seldom, if ever, have we seen such 
exquisite leather as the manufac- 
turers have produced this year, 
and we have caught their spirit in 
designing BAGS and PURSES to 
suit. 

The FASHIONS will consist of 
DAINTY SILK BAGS in MOIRE 
and FAILLE, with light colored 
linings, attractive frames and fit- 
tings; BEAUTIFULLY colored 
LEATHERS which lend them- 
selves to artistic treatment in 
LADIES' BAGS and PURSES; 
CHARMING MINIATURE BAGS 
for CHILDREN— Fitted PARTY 
CASES, and the more sober but 
always seasonable MOROCCO and 
PERSIAN LINES. When you 
require LEATHER GOODS get 
in touch with 

Federated Leather 

Goods Co., Limited 

MONTREAL 



Now for Spring 



WE ARE READY WITH 
A FULL RANGE OF 

Marabou Capes 
Artificial Flowers 
Feather Trimmings 

Our sample room is conveniently 
located and you will find your complete 
needs in the above lines at this house. 
Prompt deliveries made. 

Fans of all the wanted styles at once. 

Dominion Ostrich Feather Co. 

LIMITED 
78 Wellington St. West, TORONTO 



So Many of Your Customers Know About 

BRITISH 

GOVERNMENT 

LINEN 

NO DOUBT YOU HAVE BEEN ASKED FOR IT. 
THERE ARE SEVERAL WEAVES. EVERY YARD IS 
OF THE VERY HIGHEST CLASS. NEVER BEFORE 
AND PROBABLY NEVER AGAIN WILL LINEN OF 
THIS ABNORMALLY HIGH QUALITY BE MANU- 
FACTURED. THE IDEA EMBODIED IN THE 
WEAVING IS LEAST WEIGHT WITH GREATEST 
STRENGTH AND DURABILITY. EVERY INCH OF 
THREAD WAS TESTED, EVERY YARD IS GOV- 
ERNMENT INSPECTED. IT IS THE FINEST PURE 
IRISH LINEN CLOTH THE WORLD HAS EVER 
SEEN. BLEACHED OR UNBLEACHED, IT HAS 
INFINITE USES FOR HOUSEHOLD AND DRESS 
PURPOSES. GOVERNMENT LINEN IS NOW BEING 
ADVERTISED IN CANADA FROM COAST TO 
COAST. THOUSANDS OF HOUSEWIVES AL- 
READY HAVE SAMPLE ORDERS. WE HAVE NO 
TRAVELLERS. WRITE FOR DEALERS' SAMPLES 
AND DISCOUNTS. 

William A. Lowry & Company 

Distributors British Government Linen 
New Birks Building, - Montreal, Can. 



/ ' I rood* Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



HO 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKp »piiiiiiiiiiiiirpiiiiiiiii ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^1 



Wyt Western leatjer #oobg Co,Xtfc 

255-257 Richmond St. W. - Toronto 

Jfflamtiacturers. of JftneHeatljer (Soobg 




We are showing for 
Spring selling a great 
variety of novelties in 
Beauty Bags, Canteen 
Cases, Vanity Bags, 
Silk Bags and Avenue 
Purses, in all the new 
f a n c y leathers and 
styles. 

Also a great range of 
staples in Ladies' Hand 
Bags and Belts, Men's 
Pocket Books, ete. 



An inspection of our line, either in our Toronto Show Rooms or our Travellers' Sample Rooms, 
will be of great interest to Dealers in Fancy Leather Goods. 




Our Old Motto Preoails- 
Honest Goods 

at Honest Prices 




The Oldest and Original 

Trimmings Establishment 

in the Dominion. 



THE SPRING 1921 

will be a Big Trimmings Season. QOur New Range of Patterns 
will surprise you. Q Beautiful Fancy Braids and Yard Trimmings, 
with Silk, Wool and Tinsel Effects. Q Cords, Fringes, Girdles, 
Drop Ornaments, Tassels in large variety of Chic Designs. 

THE MOULTON MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 

4 INSPECTOR STREET - MONTREAL 

REPRESENTATIVES: 
TORONTO : J. Rutherford, 23 Scott Street. MARITIME PROVINCES : F. L. Wright. MONTREAL : M. S. Adcock. 

WINNIPEG ; Cleat & Co., A. E. Partridge, 708 Builders Exchange. VANCOUVER : Cleat & Co., Robt. Cleat, Williams Block. 



150 



Dry Goods Review 



The Art of Fitting a Corset 

Of Greatest Importance in the Corset Department is the Service Provided — Every Model Sold 

Should be Fitted, and Every Fitter Should be a Trained Corsetiere Possessed of 

Intelligence and Charm — Features of Spring Trade. 



THERE is nothing alarming: in the 
frequent statement of corset buy- 
ers to the effect that business is 
dull just now; it is only the natural re- 
sult of the tendency to delay buying in 
the ready-to-wear departments which 
is now reacting on the retail trade. But 
notwithstanding this tendency to econ- 
omize and to indulge in repairs, the cor- 
set business is indispensable and every 
effort should be directed in 1921 towards 
building up a splendid Spring trade, 
which will attract and hold customers by 
reason of a policy of better service, wider 
range of goods and moderate prices. No 
one expects the corset department to 
do its usual amount of business prior to 
Christmas, but the latter part of De- 
cember was marked by unprecedented 
activity on the part of the manufactur- 
ers whose agents have been endeavoring 
to create an interest in this line which 
will result in dissipating the apathy ex- 
isting in the retail trade. 

One man in Montreal, who is a corset 
specialist and only undertakes orders 
made-to-measure, stated to'a representa- 
vi; of Dry Goods Review, that he did 
not think he could reduce his prices 
materially until June at least, for the 
reason that factories are for the most 
part running on short time and cannot 
promise prompt deliveries of any goods. 
Furthermore, orders for fabrics which he 
placed a month ago cannot be delivered 
until June next. Rubber parts, such as 
suspenders and inserts are hard to pro- 
cure, and labor is just as high as ever 
although fewer hands are at work. Pro- 
duction is inevitably slower as a con- 
sequence. As far as steels are concern- 
ed, this maker stated that whereas he 
formerly paid $3.20 per gross for a good 
quality, the price now was in the vicin- 
ity of $9.50, about three times as much. 
All these factors will keep the cost of 
the finished article up for some time to 
come, but it is said that the new models 
for 1921 will be better value than ever. 

It will indeed be a serious matter later 
on if orders continue to be sparingly 
placed, because the corset trade is one of 
the very few which depend upon steady 
business conditions. The manufacturers 
cannot afford to gamble upon possibili- 
ties, the cost of production in their line 
is much too high. Unless buyers place or- 
ders early and often, they cannot expect 
to see prices descend in high grade lines 
in keeping with other lines of merchan- 
dise. There appears little likelihood that 
lines will change radically before next 
autumn on account of the many diffi- 
culties incident to manufacture before 
noted, and every additional inch of 



lengthened skirt means just so much 
more extra cost in the finished article. 

The Art of Corset Fitting 

The Montreal maker above referred to 
is also an expert fitter, unusual as this 
may seem, and after an experience of 
some 33 years, gives it as his opinion 
that the fundamental basis of good cor- 
setry is to show a woman how to put 
her corset on. "I have often fitted wo- 
men perfectly only to have them tele- 
phone me in a day or so that they cannot 
put the corset on, and asking me to send 
out an assistant to see what is wrong. 
I always ask how they put it on, and : t 
always happens that they have just 
hooked it on any way without giving a 
thought to their waist line or whether 
the corset is cut in a totally different 
style to the one they are accustomed 
to wearing. It takes time to become ac- 
customed to the niceties of corset ad- 
justment and few women understand 
just where the psychological point for 
placing the corset waist-line really is. 
Let them put on and take off their new 
corset several times, until they under- 
stand its construction perfectly, so that 
they will remember to adjust the under- 
wear and fasten the supporters correctly 
and know which end of the laces to draw 
up first. In a word, a woman must be 
taught to be her own corsetiere, if she 
is going to be thoroughly satisfied with 
her purchase." This expert further 
spoke on the difficulty most makers have 
with their special orders which come 
in from doctors for their own patients, 
and how frequently their specifications 
are at faut. He believed that the ex- 
pert corsetiere should be able to design 
a corset suitable for a surgical case bet- 
ter than a doctor could, because most 
physicians cling to the idea that a corset 
is necessarily a stiff and unyielding 
garment and must be reinforced by all 
sorts of insets which make it ungainly 
and cumbersome. "Some of them are 
unaware that such a thing as a supple 
tricot corset, without any bones, exists, 
and they cherish memories of stiff whale- 
bone and wasp waists, which apparently 
dictate the choice of the average doctor 
nowadays," he concluded. 

Opinions of Experts 

In a series of interviews with promin- 
ent corsetieres Dry Goods Review has as- 
certained some interesting theories upon 
the present state of the corset depart- 
ments in the retail trade. One clever 
little woman who is famous throughout 
Canada for her corsetry was induced to 
impart some of her ideas as follows: 



"I always advise my assistants .when 
they are starting out to fit a customer, 
to take their time and select the right 
model. Furthermore, I insist that they 
fit the corset according to the height 
of the lady customer and to pay no at 
tontion to what she says about sizes. 
Customers don't know what is best for 
them, and a corsetiere can only fit with 
success when she measures up and down, 
not around. The manufacturers take 
care that their sizes shall fit all figures 
which approximate the average and 
therefore hip and waist measurements 
can be taken for granted as a rule, but 
no one can tell what length skirt or bust 
a customer requires until she is meas- 
ured. That is the main reason why I 
never sell corsets over the counter. I 
must see my customer sit down in the 
corset and if I have judged correctly 
and my measurements were correct, the 
fit should be perfect with the first model 
tried on. Never ask the customer re- 
peatedly if 'that feels comfortable,' but 
watch carefully all the different points, 
such as height of bust, length of skirt, 
position of garters, and height of back. 
If the customer unconsciously stands 
with greater ease and grace or sits 
down without any perceptible discom- 
fort, you have probably fitted her per- 
fectly. If possible, get the customer 
to keep on the old one before you begin 
to try on the new corset, and ask her to 
explain what she has found comfortable 
or satisfactory about it. If she does 
not like it because it was badly fitted or 
made her look too stout, etc., it will be 
all the easier to remedy this and to pre- 
vent such faults from recurring." 

Training the Staff 

According to this corset expert, she 
finds it most proftable to carry about 
eight lines of standard corsets with 
about ten models in each line. This num- 
ber should be sufficient for the average 
department or specialty shop, and the 
majority of models should be about $5 
in price, if the trade is according to av- 
erage. When new girls are taken on, 
she keeps them busy lacing corsets until 
they are able to do so quickly and ac- 
curately, and are thereby familiarized 
with the large variety of models in stock. 
She insists upon their memorizing the 
stock numbers and the features of each 
distinctive line of corsets, and will not 
permit them to fit a customer until 
they are quite proficient in these 
fundamentals. Then she lets them be 
present at fittings and points out the 
various points to be considered in the 
Continued on page 152 



Dry Goods Review 



151 



Features of the Spring Corset Lines 

Development of Corset Industry Leads to Manufacture of Comfortable, Appearance-improv- 
ing Models — Disposition Towards Greater Freedom Encouraged — Manufacturers 
Cutting Prices to Reflect Drop in Materials. 

Written for Dry Goods Review by a promin nt Canadian corset manufacturer 



THE "corset" as referring to the 
body-sets or stays, as they are 
still termed in England, is a mis- 
nomer to-day. The twentieth century 
product of the corset manufacturer bears 
no resemblance whatever to the models 
designed even a few years back. The 
modern corset is reflecting the change 
which characterizes modern dress, and 
which characterizes civilization as we 
see it — freedom is represented in every 
line and comfort is provided where sup- 
port is needed. 

The artistically inclined are disposed 
to refer to the body as "the human form 
divine." Woman with her usual keen 
intuition, passes up the divinity in the 
human form and gets a garment called 
a corset to smooth out, cover, redis- 
tribute, bridge, gently control this 
humanity with lines — mathematical and 
artistic conceptions of beauty — with the 
result that we see an ever changing sil- 
houette, a variety of beauty which proves 
a great relief to the senses which are all 
too easily tired of repetition or same- 
ness. 

People who buy and sell corsets for 
the consumer may well forget the body 
to some extent in handling their various 
lines for the problems which they will 
enoounted,in their business will be varied. 
For instance — what are you going to do 
when you are confronted with a customer 
who is clearly a subject for a 30 or 32 
inch waist with full bust, but who states 
quite emphatically, "I want a 23 inch 
long hipped high bust corset/' Your 
prospective customer may have been 
reading a magazine in which it was 
pointed out that there is a great deal 
of satisfaction for full figures in a 
moderately high bust corset, well boned 
and properly proportioned. She sighs 
with relief, remembering the discom- 
forts of the low models she has worn 
— hence the enquiry. But the customer 
is most likely thinking of bust heights 
as discussed seven years ago and of 
waist measures of 10 years or more 
ago, when women were loath to go 
beyond a 23 inch waist. 

What then will you do if such a cus- 
tomer comes to your department? Will 
you lose her patronage by saying: "We 
haven't got anything in a high bust," or 
"No, our stock is up-to-date!" Or will you 
approach the subject tactfully by a feel- 
er such as: "Is the corset for yourself, 
madam?" If it is and invariably it is, 
you will then in a business-like manner 
offer to measure your customer, waist, 
hips and bust, at the same time cheer- 




fully enquiring if she wishes a front or 
back laced model, etc. Then you pro- 
ceed to show her something the proper 
height and length with suitable propor- 
tions, all the time keeping her posted^ 
with intelligent information in which 
you explain that, "These are the high 
models this season made expressly for 
people of your build, and I am sure you 
will find that this particular pair will 
just meet all your requirements." 

Proper consideration should of course 
be given to the price, for on ;his IV. ure 
is based a very large percentage of sat- 
isfaction. A too cheap corset will not 
stand up or endure hard wear and re- 
flects unjustly upon the intelligence of 
the saleswoman and the purchaser. 

Lines This Spring 

Corset lines this season are running 
more strongly to lower models with 
elastic in the tops in widths ranging 
from 1V2, 2 and 3 inches. High bust is 
considered 4 to AVs inches and medium 
bust 3 to 3V2 inches above the normal 
waist line. 

There are the usual graduations in hip 
proportions to cover all needs from the 
slim lightly boned full hip models, which 
have proven such a boon to women who 
hold office positions at which they remain 
seated the greater part of the day, to the 
heavier boned, fuller proportioned mat- 
ron's corsets. 

Novelties abound in the topless elastic 
sided models and these are much better 
for skating, dancing and all recreations 
than the all elastic garment. Low and 
medium bust sports corsets, with girdle 
tops, in plain pink or white or in pret- 
ty broches are the order of the day. 

Pinks are very popular and dainty in 
the extreme, and while the staples are 
not selling to any greater extent in pink 
than 2 to 5 the novelties are much pre- 
ferred in pink. 



Many manufacturers are still holding 
off in the revision of their Spring price 
lists, but there are those who have chosen 
to take their medicine and get it over 
with quickly and these makers have cut 
their prices to reflect the drop in corset 
materials. Where corsets reflect the drop 
in the market, it is safe to buy reason- 
able requirements to cover sales until 
the end of May or the beginning of 
June. 

Prices for Fall may be even a little 
lower but this depends almost entirely 
on the extent pf the American recovery 
of confidence, and the amount of buying 
done by the big corset interests. 

If cloth users start enormous demands, 
prices will undoubtedly stiffen and it is 
altogether likely that such will be the 
case, for it would be most unfortunate if 
they should go below present levels at 
this stage. 

One concern of which I know has re- 
duced stocks to the basis of replacement 
prices, and is doing the biggest January 
business in its history. It is claimed by 
this particular firm that the public can 
and will buy if values are right and 
prices reasonable. 

In my opinion "pep" and optimism 
can make this the biggest year yet, and 
if you and all others in the trade look 
alive and work for it, success and pro- 
gress will attend your efforts. 



FRENCH LINGERIE 

Continued from page 144 

black jet, while a pink linen garment is 
threaded with black ribbons to stimulate 
checkerboard effects. Some amusling 
nightgowns are also shown in Paris, 
made of silk voile printed all over in 
soft colors, in flowered or scroll pat- 
terns. These are very simply cut, 
pleated softly and hang from little rib- 
bon straps on the shoulder. Red brocade 
is the curious choice of a famous dress- 
maker for a nightgown, which features 
a high buttoned choker collar, and a 
Russian closing trimmed with black but- 
tons. 

Quite the most marvellous creation of 
the month in Paris in lingerie was a robe 
of pale pink crepe turco, overhung with 
white georgette embroidered in tiny sea- 
shells and caught to the wearer's wrists 
with ribbons. Such garments are ex- 
pressive of the height of the creator's 
art, yet are scarcely likely to find many 
followers on this side of the Atlantic. 



OKS E T D K T A RTM KNT 



/);•'/ Goods Review 



Plenty of Novelty 
in Brassiere and 
Corset Lines Seen 

American manufacturers are on the 
alert this season, in the endeavor to de- 
vise new ideas in corsets or brassieres, 
which will be sufficiently novel and dif- 
ferent to attract the somewhat wavering- 
interest of the large body of consumers. 
This action is also copied to a small ex- 
tent by domestic manufacturers, who de- 
spite the difficulties of present day con- 
ditions, are offering more than their 
usual good range of models. 

Among the samples shown by several 
different makers recently were noted 
some new ideas in brassieres, including 
the side fastening model, which is quite 
new and very convenient. The side 
fastening is particularly well adapted to 
the bandeau type of garment. All the 
usual fabrics are being shown for 
Spring, including silk brocades, washable 
>atins, broches, batistes, heavy basket- 
weave fabrics, tricots, and lace combin- 
ation effects. Flesh color undoubtedly 
predominates, except, of course, where 
the lace garments are concerned, and the 
latter type are by far the most delight- 
ful offerings shown for Spring and Sum- 
mer. One exquisite model was made of 
ecru filet lace lined with net, and was 
designed in simple bandeau style with 
wide ribbon shoulder straps which tended 
in a yoke effect in front. Exquisite 
French rose-buds and forgetmenots were 
attached to each point of the yoke. Ano- 
ther lace model was of the torchon var- 
iety lined with heavy net and finished at 
the top with a ribbon drawstring. This 
model was designed to be used either as 
a camisole or vestee as desired. A third 
model made by the same manufacturer 
was of rare old Cluny lace, mounted over 
flesh wash satin, and gathered at the 
waist line with elastic. In all cases, the 
plain ribbon shoulder strap was prefer- 
red. 

Embroidered in Pastels 

Another new model shown by a Mont- 
real manufacturer, was of flesh tricot 
material in back fastening style, finished 
-imply across the top by a yoke effect 
of fine lace and satin ribbon daintily 
embroidered in pastel shades. More and 
more is the demand being felt f >r this 
brassiere which will combine camisole or 
vestee as required, and in this style the 
elastic gathered waist is easi'y most in 
demand. In such models, however, an 

tension shoulder piece of the lace is 
preferred to the simple ribMn strap. 

The Web Belt 

In the regulation models, especially 
intended for really stout women, the 
newest model show; an elastic or web 
belt, about three inches in depth which 
is said to reduce the diaphragm and at 
the same time eiven a flattening effect 



to the bust. The main portion of the 
garment is made of dainty rows of lace 
and flowered ribbon alternating, and the 
shoulder straps are made of shirred 
elastic in a color harmonizing with the 
ribbons employed. Altogether, it is a 
far cry to the old-time boned and dart- 
fitted armor-plate style which unfortun- 
ately formed the introduction to the com- 
forts of brassiere wear on the part of 
most women. 

Spring corset lines, as pointed out by 
the corset manufacturer quoted else- 
where in these pages, indicate a popular 
demand for the elastic topped models, 
or for models with a very short front 
bone. Flesh color is expected to go 
better than ever, and the front lace 
style is just about as popular as the 
back lace style. A large amount of 
business is being done on models for 
stout women this year, and the various 
patented arrangements such as inner 
belts, adjustable sections, webbed inserts, 
etc., are shown as usual. One of the few 
new features noted was the overlapping 
effect in suspender arrangement, which 
it is claimed holds down the skirt of the 
corset better than when the garter is 
stitched to the extreme edge. 

The slip-over style of corset is very 
popular in Paris just now but is not re- 
garded with favor by the majority of 
smart women over here. There is too 
much inconvenience in putting it on to 
ensure its enduring popularity. 

One of the most sensible improvements 
to be introduced by one or two Canadian 
makers of late is the perforated ring 
fastening which secures the bones in 
position. These small fasteners abso- 
lutely prevent the bones from riding up 
or down when the corset shows some 
signs of wear, and are meeting with 
general approval. 



THE ART OF FITTING A CORSET 

Continued from page 150 

fitting. Lastly, they are asked to fit 
her personally, and when this is done 
with the degree of accuracy and effici- 
ency which is expected of her staff, the 
beginner then becomes a full-fledged 
corsetiere. 

Brassiere Fittings 

Regarding brassieres, she has equally 
sound theories. "We never sell a 
brassiere without a fitting," she de- 
clare. I, and further stated that she always 
fitted a brassiere over a new corset with- 
out waiting to ask the customer if she 
would like one or not. If the corset se- 
lected is an evening model, a brassiere 
in one of the delicate flesh tricots, with 
just a touch of dainty floral embroidery, 
cut very low, yet durable and strong in 
construction, will delight any customer 
and will seldom fail to sell itself. It is 
•best to. fit on a back-fastening model at 
the present time, as bandeau types are 
holding the field in point of popularity. 
In any case the expert corsetiere will sell 
the customer at least two brassieres, 
either for day or evening wear, and 



should have a large range of different 
styles at hand. 

When questioned regarding her plans 
for the coming Spring, she stated that 
she intended to keep her stock up to 
normal, as it was at present, and that 
she was placing her orders now as 
needed. "We do not anticipate much 
change in prices until the Summer," she 
concluded, "and I believe that neither the 
public nor the manufacturers desii-e any 
change in lines at present." 

A feature of this corsetiere's very up- 
to-date shop is a large placard which 
sets forth the statement: "Tell us your 
corset troubles. We can correct them." 
In connection with this announcement, 
Dry Goods Review w r as informed that a 
large repair factory is run in connection 
with the shop, and with the assistance 
of a small corps of skilled operators all 
epair work can be done over night and 
delivered by noon the next day. Every 
sort of work is carried out by this cap- 
able woman, including the laundering 
and dyeing of corsets, re-boning, adjust- 
ing, enlarging, or mending as the case 
may require. This corsetiere also wel- 
comes any special orders, such as sur- 
gical corsetry frequently demands, and 
believes that although there may be little 
money in this end of the business, yet 
such service is the highest expression 
of the art of corsetry and should be fea- 
tured by every woman who is ambitious 
of making a success in this profession. 
"Co-operate with the medical and surgi- 
cal profession if you would lay the 
foundation of success," she declared. 
"But such co-operation can only be at- 
tempted after years of experience in 
practical work, coupled with an exhaus- 
tive study of anatomy and physiology 
and at least a slight knowledge of art, 
as it affects the lines and posture of the 
human body. Finally I should lay the 
greatest stress upon the personal appear- 
ance of the corsetiere herself. She, above 
all others, must radiate the glow of 
health, must have both poise and correct 
carriage, and be as well groomed as cir- 
cumstances will permit. If she can add 
the qualities of cheerfulness and a well 
informed mind to all the above requis- 
ites, the result will be the ideal cor- 
setiere." 



A STRIKING STORE FRONT 

Woodstock. — A new store front for the 
dry goods establishment of T. W. Gray 
& Bryan, Ltd., Dundas Street, has re- 
cently been completed, and it has effected 
a wonderful change in the appearance of 
the premises. The old windows were 
entirely removed, and the large new ones 
put in their place. The new windows are 
more than ten feet deep, double the size 
of the former ones. A handsome metal 
marquee has taken the place of the old 
cotton awnings and a t marble doorway 
has been put in place. Gray & Bryan's 
is now one of the most handsome stores 
en Woodstock's main street. 



/>,•// Goods Review 



153 



Gloves, the Veil and a Jaunty Bag 



Charmi 
Mod 



ing Effects in Lovely Lace Veils and Neat Designs in Yardage Meshes Are Equally 

i s h Contrasting Effects Good — Gaily Tinted French Pocketbooks and Large 

Leather Bags Are Shown. 



THE Spring hat will be very partic- 
ular as to veils. Considerable 
leniency marks Dame Fashion's 
attitude towards this very important ac- 
cessory, for this season will see her favor 
shared by both the yardage mesh and the 
made veil which has enjoyed such hon- 
ors during the past two seasons. The 
made veil for Spring will achieve even 
lovelier effects for the Spanish influences 
sponsored by Paris are encouraging more 
lavish use of lace, and many hats even 
for street wear in the early Spring will 
feature exquisite lace and drapes or tiny 
"curtains" falling over flower brims or 
crowns. The fabric hat which usually 
precedes the all straw model each spring- 
is considerably enhanced by an artistic 
arrangement of a draped veil. Many so 
called strictly tailored silk and satin 
shapes rely altogether upon the veil 
for their decorative note. The veils this 
season vary widely in design and pattern 
— ranging from the plain black octagonal 
mesh with a border tracery in geometric 
design, to the elaborate real lace models 
imported from abroad. 

The chenille dotted veil is very chic. 
Black cobwebby meshes in very fine 
thread are shown with soft chenille dots 
in henna, copper, bronze blue, tan and 
even grey. Traceries are also done in 
contrasting shades and combinations of 
bronze and brown, grey and silver, black 
and steel are shown. Tiny paillettes gar- 
nish some of the more extreme models 
and bead borders are featured with those 
bound in straw or cut leather. But these 
last named of course are included in 
the novelties designed for the exclusive 
trade. 

Grey veils are to be very fashionable 
and in yardage meshes a beautiful assort- 
ment in shadow effects is being offered. 
Lace edges on fine meshes are shown and 
conventional borders on coarser veils. 

Many of these veils are designed so 
that they should he permanently draped 
over the chapeau, and never worn over 
the face, as their designs are apt to give 
an unnatural effect to the features. It 
should be remembered that the decorative 
veil is best worn off the face by the ma- 
jority of women and when a face veil is 
wanted, the saleswoman should do her 
best to sell one that will not render the 
face of the wearer bizarre or unreal. A 
dainty mesh with a pretty motif or a 
smart border is always an effective com- 
plement to the street attire of the smart- 
ly dressed woman. Encouraging the 
customer to purchase a veil that is be- 
coming as well as modish will bring her 
back to your counter again. The effect- 




An Artistic Coiffure 

A lovely arrangement of the tresses is 
invariably enhanced by a pretty ornament. 
A large gold rose with bunches of silver 
grapes and silver leaves makes this par- 
ticular coiffure one of the prettiest possible. 

ive display of becoming meshes or pretty 
wax models will also add to the sales at 
the veiling counter, and in this respect 
the head of the department should insist 
on being supplied with the smart hats 
available from the millinery department, 
for the arrangement of a smart veil 
over a mediocre hat does more harm 
than good to the department and makes 
the shopper class it with the out of date 
sections that she had tabulated in her 
mind as "places not to shop." 

Bags 

An advice from Paris says that inter- 
esting collections of pocket books are 
being shown in a wide range of colored 
kid, including bright greens, oriental 
reds, sand color and cream. 

One especially attractive pocket book 
is in a bright green, with gold burnished 
design of tiny flowers, the centers being 
in black. It is an envelope shape and 
unfolds disclosing two large side pockets. 
It is fastened with a strap and there is 
a band of leather to slip the hand through 
to hold it easily. 

This same shape is repeated in cream 
with gold burnished design in conjunction 
with black. on a "tooled" surface similar 



to repoussee ground work. These are 
offered at 18 francs each. 

Another variety to be seen is envelope 
shape in sand or natural leather color, 
with a "wheel medallion" or "motif" in 
openwork revealing red and green leather 
effects. 

A few card cases are shown, among 
the most interesting one in Oriental red 
with a "tooled" circular design. The 
pockets, instead of being sewn, are held 
by a strip of sheepskin threaded in a 
wide tacking effect, similar to the ancient 
Sienese craft still seen in Tuscany. 
These are priced at 7 francs each. 

Some large bags with a cord, to be 
worn slung over the shoulder, are shown 
in brown leather with designs in gold and 
colors blended, and are fringed with long 
strips of leather. 

Gloves 

The vogue for grey has spread to the 
glove counter — the mousquetaire in grey 
kid is the glove of the moment in Paris, 
and it is reported that gauntlet gloves 
in silk and kid will be very prominently 
featured on this side this season. 

Gauntlet styles held snugly at the 
wrists with dome fastened straps have 
become very popular in white and in 
pale "dust, and ashes" shades and the 
fashion authorities in Paris are pronounc- 
ing these gauntlet gloves with contrast- 
ing trimmings on the flare sections as the 
very last word in chic accessories. 

Tiny strips of leather, in black, are 
seen on white and grey models, and 
many of the imported models show the 
wrist slit so that the soft leather goes 
through like a ribbon and ties in a 
saucy bow on the top of the hand. 

Silk and fabric gauntlet gloves are 
also very strong and light shades with 
black backs and stitching are very smart. 

Coiffure ornaments continue to pre- 
sent new novelties of distinction. Gold 
and silver combinations are among the 
Spring offerings for Easter festivities, 
and beautiful circlets as well as clusters 
of fruit and flowers in combination are 
shown. 

The Spanish comb is featured in cut 
jet. tortoise and pale tinted opalescent 
shell brilliantly studded. The combs are 
cut very high again and add a char-m- 
ing note to the new formal dinner gowns 
which show graceful draperies and trains. 

Leather, fabric and metal bags all 
have a showing this Spring. The silk 
bag in grey moire or grosgrain, trimmed 
with cut steel beads, will be very smart 
especially if grey gloves, grey silk hose 
and grey suede French shoes with tiny 
cut steel buttons are worn. 



154 CORSET DEPARTMENT Dry Goods Review 



Before Buying Your Corsets for 
Spring — See the Warner Line 

Someone in your town will soon be carrying Warner's Rust-Proof 
Corsets, so before committing yourself for another six months or so, look 
over these new Canadian-made Corsets, duplicates of the Warner style 
so famous in the United States. 

Dollar for dollar there is unexpected value in a Warner's corset — 
the kind of value that you like to give your customers. 

Jfjorrier's 

Corsets- 

Made in Canada 

Our Canadian-made line runs from $12 to $36 per dozen, Back 
Lace and Front Lace. Do you want pink corsets, in brocade or plain coutil ? 
We have them. Do you want models for the full figure — for the young 
girl — for the average normal figure? You will find excellent styles in the 
Warner line. Rubber tops and semi-rubber tops — they are there as well. 

But see the corsets and judge for yourself. Tell us the types and 
prices in which you are interested, and our representative will call or send 
you samples. 

Be one of the first. Show Warner's for 102 1 
and Watch Your Corset Business Grow 



The Warner Brothers Company, Inc. 

of Bridgeport, Conn. 
Canadian Factory and Sales Office : 

St. Ambroise and Turgeon Streets Montreal, P.Q. 



Dry Goods Review 



C R S E T D E P A K T M E N T 



155 





STOCK LIQUIDATION 

Present economic conditions are again emphasizing to dealers everywhere 
the importance of stocking only merchandise of unquestioned and well 
known quality. 

To-day, the vital subject confronting the large majority of merchandise 
managers and corset buyers is "stock liquidation." 

Too many merchants are being compelled to seek unusual means for the 
proper handling of this most unfortunate merchandise situation — a situa- 
tion that could have been avoided easily had the departments not been 
stocked with an unnecessary number of lines. Particularly is this true of 
the average corset department. 

Recent investigations made by this Company, established the fact that in 
many corset departments the insistent and steady demand for 



F rout 
Lac in g 



had reduced the dealer's stock of models and sizes until it would no longer 
take care of his needs. Instead of filling in his Gossard stock (which 
the sales proved to be the fastest selling and consequently the most profit- 
able line carried), the merchant was endeavoring to fill his calls for Gos- 
sards with inferior, slow moving and unsaleable merchandise. 

Not only will such short-sighted merchandising react immediately on to- 
day's business, but if continued will inevitably spell disaster to the mer- 
chant in the loss of that public good will and confidence that must form 
the backbone of all permanently successful business. 

As a safeguard against a re-occurrence of the present merchandising situ- 
ation we suggest: First, reduce permanently the number of lines now 
carried in your corset department. Second, keep your stock of Gossard 
Corsets well filled in, and remembei that any merchant carrying a repre- 
sentative stock of these original front lacing corsets is in a position to 
successfully corset from this line alone, any woman of any figure type 
who may come into his store. 

The Canadian II. W. Gossard Co., Limited. 
166-378 West Adelaide Street, Toronto, Canada 



15G 



Dry (roods Review 



The Joys of Toys in Paris 

French Children and French Parents Like the Children and Parents All Over the World Pay 

Homage to Santa Claus — Young Hands Clap in Ecstasy and the Eyes of Their 

Parents Shine With Happy Memories as Child and Adult, Hand in Hand, 

Wander Through the Toylands of the French Capital at Holiday 

Time. 



PARIS.— He who has not visited 
Paris at this time of the year has 
lost one of the prettiest sights of 
the French capital. 

December is the month when the 
streets look their nicest, for it is then 
that all windows are displayed in their 
gayest colors to tempt the Christmas 
shoppers. Days may be short, the sky 
dull, the rain may pour down, or it' may 
be cold — it does not matter: the windows 
are luxuriantly lighted and a warm shel- 
ter can always be found in the shops. 

Nothing could induce me to leave Paris 
at this time. I derive too much pleasure 
from such gay sights and too much de- 
light at seeing children happy, especial- 
ly the poorer ones who are more apt, 
perhaps, to enjoy the beauties of all the 
treasures which they cannot really pos- 
sess. 

I therefore have had more than one 
ramble already in the stores where toys 
are shown and sold. ^ 

Displays Are Gorgeous 

Great care is taken in the display of 
windows of these shops and the rivalry 
is very keen between them as to who 
will have the richest show. 

They are very successful, as a rule, 
for any amount of grown-ups as well 
as young people and children gather in 
patient crowds in front of these win- 
dows. While the former enjoy them- 
selves in a more sedate manner, the 
youngsters clap their hands or stamp 
with pleasure, and pass all sorts of re- 
marks. I can quite understand them all: 
the joy of the little ones reminds me 
of the far-off days when I was a little 
girl, always eager to admire the big 
doll with real hair, that closed its eyes, 
could speak and walk alone, and be 
dressed and undressed, or the doll's fur- 
niture, the stove in which it was pos- 
sible to make a real fire, the grocer's 
shop, and the working basket, with the 
fine silks, scissors (that never would 
cut), etc. 

Now that my time for such toys is 
gone forever, I still rejoice in them, and 
am glad to find every year that chil- 
dren of the present day are just the 
same as they were in my time. 

As to grown-ups enjoying- the sight, 
outside of the pleasure they may derive 
at hearing the children, they may well 
admire the taste and skill that were 
displayed in the making- up of these 
windows. 

As a rule, it is - «cene of real life 



which is reproduced with full particu- 
lars. 

A Vivid Setting 

At one of the biggest dry goods stores 
was represented a Japanese village, 
with people dressed up in kimonos, 
walking about, others entering a tea 
house, others chatting near one of these 
tiny bridges to be seen in Japan, while 
small Japanese lanterns were actually 
lighted by means of electric lamps fit 
for a doll's house. 

Another setting showed one of the 
seaside resorts at the Riviera. In the 
background, painted on a big canvass 
panel, was the blue sea, with the beach 
and bathing people. Closer was a ten- 
nis court with people playing, while oth- 
ers watched the game, chatted or walked 
about. On a terrace, all surrounded 
with mimosas, roses, and all the luxu- 
riant flowers of the country, some peo- 
ple were lounging in comfortable arm- 
chairs. Every doll was dressed up in 
the latest style, and every little detail 
of hats, bags, sunshades, etc., was care- 
fully observed. 

The Mail Coach 

Still another pretty scene depicts the 
arrival of the mail coach on a winter 
evening 200 years ago. The ground is 
covered with snow, as well as the trees, 
and the fountain is frozen. The coach 
lamps are lighted, and the scenery is 
exactly the same as seen on the pic- 
tures of that time. People arriving, 
greet each other, those that depart are 
sad, in some instances, or have a last 
chat full of practical advice (if one is 
to guess from their looks). A man is 
trying to climb the ladder to reach the 
top of the coach, and as he cannot get 
there, the porter is pushing him behind. 
Another one vainly tries to get in his 
dog, that has made up its mind not to 
stir. This for the travelers. The inn 
people are busy getting dinner ready. A 
big fire is blazing in the kitchen; a cook 
is seen with a chicken in his hand, ready 
for the frying pan. A washerwoman is 
busy brushing linen in spite of the cold; 
a groom tends a horse in the yard, and 
many other details of a similar nature 
are carefully observed, even the shape 
of the feet of the travellers in the snow. 

Of course, all of them are dressed in 
old time costumes, the man with knick- 
erbockers, three cornered hats, and coat 
tails, the women with pannier gowns, 
fancy hair dressing, shawls, etc., in the 
shades then in vogue. 



If you can realize all these dolls mov- 
ing as the people did in those days you 
will not be surprised to hear that so 
many people enjoy the sight. 

The Village Fair 

Somewhere else I saw the *air at the 
village. 

Here, again, a full display of country 
pleasures is correctly shown. You see 
first the peasants in their best Sunday 
clothes entering the church, while the 
bell ringer exerts himself (and you actu- 
ally see the movement of the bell and 
rope). Then, there is the place' where 
cattle are sold; scores of cows, calves, 
horses, sheep, pigs, etc., are shown and 
peasants discuss prices exactly as they 
do in real life. In fact you feel you 
could follow their conversation. 

Then, the Fair itself with the candy 
shops, circus, swings, wooden h »rses, 
merry-go-rounds etc. 

The First Christmas 

Another shop has two different kinds 
of window shows: one represents the sta- 
ble where our Lord was born; He is seen 
in His cradle, with the Holy Virgin 
close by Him, and the ass and ox watch- 
ing. Outside come the Wise Men, the 
worshippers bringing presents, either on 
foot, or with loaded camels. It is a 
very touching sight. 

A Practical Demonstration 

The other window is a very interest- 
ing display of the use of water-falls. 
The question of coal being most impor- 
tant here, a great deal has been said 
and done to get hold of this force known 
here under the name of "Houille 
Blanche." 

Therefore they have wisely thought 
people would be interested to see how 
it worked, and they have shown a fac- 
tory in the mountains, which, by the 
way, are of a lovely coloring, with the 
turbines and various electric machines 
and a real electric train running on rails 
to show what can be obtained. 

The Toys Featured 

The halls reserved for toys are always 
fine. The most beautiful I saw was one 
where a huge lampshade was hanging 
from the ceiling with colored lighting, 
around which were big Japanese lan- 
terns of different shades always lighted, 
which was exceedingly pretty. 

Amongst the toys there are, as usual, 
the dolls and everything connected with 
Continued on page 157 



Tfrn Goods fit rn ir 



157 



Plenty of Linen Stocks Available 

Very Little Buying Has Been Done, But Importers Urge Advisability of Avoiding Too Big 

a Rush Later — "Buy Now" is Urgent Slogan — Renewed Interest in Dainty Styles 

of Household and Table Linens — Do Not Expect Big Drop in 192 1 — Only 

25% of Flax Needed is in Sight. 



IN discussing the prospects for 1921 
as regards the flax and linen in- 
dustries with a prominent Montreal 
wholesaler, Dry Goods Review was in- 
formed that only about 25 per cent, of 
the supply of flax needed for 1921 was in 
sight, and furthermore that most of the 
world's supply of flax, as derived from 
Belgium, Japan and Canada, is required 
for seeding purposes, in view of the total 
ruin of the Russian and Irish yields. To 
quote this well informed authority, it ap- 
pears that "there are certain salient fea- 
tures that govern everything else in the 
linen industry and the first great funda- 
mental fact is the potential shortage of 
'raw material, a shortage that will 
develop if there is a normal demand. The 
word 'Russia' spells the whole thing. 
There is no flax in sight from that coun- 
try, and even if there were, the shipping 
facilities are such as to make it almost 
imposible to get the flax out. A second 
important consideration is that if the 
price of flax is not guaranteed, farmers, 
particularly Irish farmers, will not plant 
it, because things like oats and potatoes 
would be more profitable. A good deal 
will depend on what food stuffs do— if 
they should drop, the relative value of 
flax would change. Nobody is anxious in 
Belfast, or going out of his way to ask 
people to buy. They are just waiting 
for things to improve and if the mills 
close down for a few weeks there is 
bound to be a big shortage of goods." 

When asked whether he thought it 
would be possible for the Belfast market 
to do business at present levels, this 
wholesaler explained that they were do- 
ing a good business before the dull period 
came and he saw no reason why they 
should not do so again. What they will 
have to pay the farmer and labor must 
be taken into consideration, and) the 
farmer wants about five times the pre- 
war price for his flax. Belfast manufac- 
turers are hiding behind the linen assoc- 
iation, and are not dealing freely with 
their distributors, from what can be 
gathered. Not that this is done wil- 
lingly but the linen trade in general in 
Ireland is apparently controlled to such 
an extent that the buyers on this side of 
the Atlantic often feel they have been 
discriminated against. 

"Prices, generally speaking, are firm," 
this wholesaler continued, "and I under- 
stand that few cancellations have been 
accepted and these only in cases where 
the firm that bought the goods would not 
be able to pay for them. Prices are 
about on a level with those of last De- 



cember and January, with the exception 
of goods made from tow yarns, which 
are somewhat lower. If there is a de- 
cent demand, they should continue fairly 
firm after the present agreement ex- 
pires." 

From reliable sources also it is learn- 
ed that continental yarns are being of- 
fered in Belfast, and are 15 per cent, 
less than the native made goods, also a 
drop of 40 per cent, is announced in the 
price of London yarns. 

One linen agent reports a drop of 30 
per cent, in linen crashes and 50 per cent, 
in cotton towellings, but these conces- 
sions on peak prices are almost negli- 
gible. Prices cannot fall appreciably in 
1921, especially if the demand from the 
American market keeps on increasing. 
The only price concessions possible will 
be from results of sacrifice or liquida- 
tion sales, but nothing of this descrip- 
tion will be forthcoming from the manu- 
facturers. 

As far as stocks in the hands of Cana- 
dian wholesalers and retailers are con- 
cerned, the opinion has been given that 
owing to high prices and poor deliveries, 
present stocks are excellent. Inability 
still counts, and on all sides it is stated 
that good cottons are selling better than 
poor linens. Most retailers are frankly 
uninterested in anything except jobs and 
undoubtedly are not replacing goods 
sold. Such a policy, however general it 
may be, cannot continue indefinitely, and 
the advice of those in close touch with 
conditions is "buy as you require as soon 
as possible; not heavily but frequently." 
"There is a decided advantage in buy- 
ing as soon as stock-taking reveals the 
necessity," stated one importer, as con- 
ditions in the linen industry are by no 
means similar to other branches of trade. 
"One wholesaler told me," he continued, 
"that he hadn't bought a dollar's worth 
of linens since May, 1920, and he believed 
there wasn't enough goods in the country 
to supply every one when the demand 
does come. Therefore I warn all retail- 
ers to buy before they run short." 

A contemporary European publication 
devoted to the interests of the textile 
trade recently announced that an import- 
ant meeting of the International Feder- 
ation of Flax Producers took place in 
Brussels in November, when nine distinct 
countries participated. 

The situation in the flax industry all 
over the world was carefully discussed 
by the delegates, and measures were pro- 
posed whereby flax producers shall be 
enabled to regulate the price of raw flax 



and control the supply. Such measures, 
it is anticipated, will have a far reaching 
effect upon the linen industry in the not 
distant future. 

A revival of interest in the luncheon 
set is promised for 1921 and reports 
from abroad state that sets comprised of 
centre piece, tea cloth and matching nap- 
kins of colored linens embroidered in 
contrasting colors or ecru are among the 
-most exclusive novelties. The old rose 
linen was used for one set embroidered 
in ecru and the cloth was in runner style 
with an irregular border. Canary yel- 
low developed in blue is another effect- 
ive combination which promises to be 
particularly popular for country house 
use during the summer. 



JOYS OF TOYS IN PARIS 

Continued from page 156 
them, and in that line I must say that 
there is a great tendency towards re- 
turning to the rag dolls of olden days. 

Dolls' furniture is very rich, and the 
prices accordingly high. 

"Le plaisir le plus delicat est de faire 
celui d'autrui," says a French writer, 
and this must be true, for I have always 
found people look happy when they buy 
what they intend giving their relatives 
and friends for Christmas or New Year's 
Day, which is the Boxing Day here. 



Trade 




'Mark 



BUTTONS^ 

Our travelers are now out with our full 
line at considerably reduced prices; it will 
pay you to wait before placing your orders 

A. WEYERSTALL & COMPANY 
Head Office: TORONTO 

"Canada's Exclusive Button House" 



Travellers Are Out Now With 
Complete Lines 

French Ivory 

Greeting Cards and Post Cards for all 
occasions 

Purses and Wallets 

Pennants, Cushions and Textile Novelties 

Supplies for Celebrations, Old Boys' Re- 
unions, etc. 

Souvenir Novelties (a tremendous variety) 

Christmas Stockings 

Conservo Lunch Sets, Splashers, Table 
Sets, Infants' Bibs and Sets 

The product of five factories we own or control 

PUGH SPECIALTY CO., Ltd. 

38 to 42 Clifford St., Toronto, Canada 



158 



Dry Goods Review 



How About Your Book Department? 

Departmental Stores Which Devote Space and Study to Literature Suitable for Their Cus- 
tomers Are Finding Excellent Response -- Henry Morgans, of Montreal, Have 
Splendid Stocks Under Supervisionof Thoroughly Competent Manager. 




An Attractive Book Department 



Splendid display tables arranged so that the maximum of aisle space may be utilized. Stationery and amateur photograph 

departments in background. 



THAT the progressive department 
store of to-day must cater to the 
intellectual needs of its customers, 
no less than to their physical require- 
ments is part of the belief of the Colonial 
House of Montreal. Realizing that good 
literature is as essential to the well being 
of Canadians, no less than is the question 
of clothing, a, large portion of the ground 
floor space was set aside for the purpose 
of serving the needs of book lovers who 
might be numbered among the many 
patrons of the firm. And this was done 
over fifteen years ago when book depart- 
ments were few and far between, and 
people looked askance at bookshelves 
amid such frivolously feminine environ- 
ments a> hosiery or neckwear counters. 
But the books stayed and multiplied, and 
added unto themselves still other ex- 
tensions in the shape of stationery and 
engraving departments, photographic 
sections, etc., until now, in an area 
roughly approximating 90 feet by 45, 
one of the most important booksellers' 
and stationers' businesses in the city of 
Montreal is carried on. 

"We cater to the whole family," ex- 
plained Mr. Milne, manager of this 
department, to a representative of Dry 
Goods Review, "and we carry books for 
everyone from the youngest child to the 
most advanced scholar." 

A glance at the well-filled tables and 
laden shelves corroborated this state- 
ment, while investigation showed what 



careful forethought underlay the selec- 
tion. Close to the western entrance is a 
large children's section, comprising both 
English and French reading matter for 
juveniles of tender age. ABC books in 
delightfully vivid colors, fairy tales, 
Mother Goose, etc., are all spread out on 
wide shelves so "he who runs may read." 
Near at hand are the tables holding neat 
rows of books for older children, separ- 
ated as to boys' and girls' stories. Else- 
where are the school books, which by the 
way is a most important feature of a 
book department. 

By keeping careful watch over the 
reading matter published for the young 
nowadays, Mr. Milne is exceedingly care- 
ful to avoid buying any of the trashy 
class of sensational fiction, the results of 
which are so detrimental to youthful im- 
aginations. Instead, he supplies the best 
books by British writers, including all 
the stirring and powerfully written fa- 
vorites of olden times, such as Captain 
Marryat, etc., which embody true British 
ideals with a marked absence of cheap 
sensational writing. 

Standard Works in Sets 

Besides the extensive juvenile section, 
there is an equally large part devoted to 
standard works of all sorts, including 
complete sets of authors such as Scott, 
Dickens, Thackeray, etc., and also poets. 
Equal attention is given to the selection 
of both gift and ordinary editions so that 



the department is always ready to serve 
the casual buyer as well as the seeker 
after prize books or Christmas gifts. 

The popular novel is not neglected 
either, and several display tables are 
piled high with "best sellers," neatly 
placarded as such. The advancing cost 
of book-making is not proving to be in- 
jurious in so far as sales are concerned, 
according to Mr. Milne, as he rarely 
needs to reduce lines which are not mov- 
ing readily. 

Still other tables are covered with 
miscellaneous reading matter, appealing 
to cultivated people of eclectic tastes, 
which covers a wide range of subjects, 
including biography, history, theology (of 
a more popular type), art, criticism and 
essays in an enormous range of editions 
and prices. The latter question is imma- 
terial where a new book is concerned, ac- 
cording to Mr. Milne, who cited the fact 
that a certain popular autobiography 
which was priced at $7.50 sold by the 
hundred at Christmas time. 

The book shelves at the sides of the de- 
partment are crowded with the popular 
pocket edition fiction and the ever popu- 
lar British reprints. Later on, the man- 
ager expects to add a French shelf for 
grown-up readers in response to a large 
demand. 

Mr. Milne and his staff of over fifteen 
assistants are thoroughly aware of the 
fact that book buyers must not be ap- 
proached by the ordinary methods of 



Dm Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



159 



salesmanship. They are aware that 
"May I serve you, madam" is an entirely 
superfluous remark, and instead they 
concern themselves with other duties un- 
til such time as it shall be wise to hover 
discreetly near and assist the purchaser 
in locating a volume or answering- ques- 
tions. "We never trouble our customers," 
explained Mr. Milne, "but we frequently 
receive requests for help from them in 
selecting books." 

Study Stocks Carefully 

Mr. Milne insists that his assistants be 
fond of reading and attentive to the 
needs of customers -as though they were 
librarians themselves. He encourages 
them to study the range of authors and 
familiarize themselves with the works 
of each, by name at least. 

Not only does the department carry 
books, but its magazine section is also 
most popular, including as it does a sub- 
scription agency which handles orders 
for hundreds of subscribers. A careful 
system of double checking is maintained 
by the department in this respect so that 
few errors ever occur. Magazines in 
themselves are not particularly profit- 
able but are an unfailing means of at- 
tracting customers to other departments, 
and it has been often proved that once 
a woman buys a magazine she invariably 
makes other purchases later, but if she 
fails to find her favorite journal she is 
apt to go out elsewhere in search of it. 

Stationery Business Big 

Across on the south side of the depart- 
ment is the stationery and engraving 
section. This is by far the most profit- 
able line carried by the department and 
is a most important branch. All grades 
and qualities of writing- paper, boxed 
and in bulk are set forth here and in ad- 
dition a very artistic line of greeting 
cards for every season of the year is 
featured. Engraving of personal greet- 
ing cards, visiting cards and wedding in- 
vitations is also done by this department, 
although in another section of the store. 
In this regard, the volume of business 
done is enormous; the only serious com- 
petitor in Montreal being a prominent 
Canadian engraving firm. In the work- 
shop where the engraving is done are 
filed away vast numbers of copper 
plates, which are carefully preserved al- 
phabetically for customers' future use. 
Every order is registered also on a time 
clock so that a record of its making is 
preserved for later checking up. 

The same minute attention to detail 
is carried out with each and every part 
of the department, not excepting the 
photographic section which, although the 
latest addition to the book section, al- 
ready threatens to grow up into a parent 
section, so greatly has it expanded. 

During the summer months, as many 
as 500 films a day are received for de- 
veloping and printing and the work is 
all done by the store itself. Enlarge- 
ments are also made here and all trou- 
bles incidental to amateur camera enthu- 



siasts are cheerfully explained away and 
helpful advice is given. By the same 
careful system of checking orders which 
prevails throughout the department, an 
accurate account is made of each and 
every order taken in, so that errors are 
practically impossible. 

That the buyer of a book department 
shoulders a heavy responsibility is fully 
realized by the manager of this well 
equipped example. He must know books 
himself, and be a well-informed and up- 
to-date student of the world's best liter- 
ature, and with the responsibility of se- 
lecting the reading matter of the entire 
family, he has need of singular qualities 
of shrewdness and balance. 



Money Prizes 

Given For New 
Knitted Stitches 

Writing from London, on activities in 
British knitted goods lines, a fashion 
correspondent describes a recent novel 
competition by which interest was stimu- 
lated to a most gratifying extent. 

Twenty thousand jumpers vied for 
honors in a knitting contest which was 
inaugurated by the "Daily Sketch." 
Prizes were offered for upwards of £'240. 
In addition to this amount offered by the 
London daily, prizes were also offered 
by companies selling the yarn. 

The knitters competed in six different 
classes, representing knitted woolen 
jumpers, crocheted woolen jumpers, silk 
or silk substitute jumpers, blouse jump- 
ers for afternoon or evening made of 
fabric, boys' woolen jumpers, and girls' 
woolen dresses. 

An exhibition of the jumpers was held 
at Barker's,* one of the largest London 
stores, and was attended by thousands of 
people, showing the great amount of in- 
terest that is taken in this form of hand 
knitted attire. 

Beautiful Stitches 

The majority of the models were of 
the slipover variety, an exception being 
a white silk crocheted sweater with silk 
crocheted buttons straight up the front, 
and the back with high collar, and long- 
close-fitting sleeves. The model was 
slashed at the sides nearly to the waist- 
line. This model is especially interest- 
ing because of the beauty of the stitches 
employed, a combination of shell stitch 
with stripes of plain crochet and fagot- 
ing. The sleeves are inset with the 
fagoting stitch. 

Included in the crochet numbers was 
a short jumper of Irish lace with a filet 
lace border at the bottom and ulso form- 
ing the round yoke. There were also 
several interesting wool crochet num- 
bers. However, the majority of the com- 
petitors submitted knitted jumpers and 
these were extremely interesting be- 
cause of the novelty of the stitches. 

Winning the first prize in this class 
was a Saxon blue slip-on reaching the 



waistline, and tying on the side. The 
sleeves which were rather full at the 
shoulders in kimono style fitted very 
snugly at the arms just above the elbow. 
The distinguishing feature of this blouse 
is the design of fleur de lys in white an- 
gora wool. 

Intricate Designs. 

Several of the jumpers had most in- 
tricate designs knitted in contrasting 
yarn, some of them resembling the Scan- 
dinavian designs. There were jumpers 
combining knitting and crocheting. 

Among the crochet numbers in wool 
was a model with the front longer than 
the back and crocheted in the form of 
horizontal stripes and buttoned to the 
chin. One of the numbers especially 
admired was a silk and metal number 
formed of backs of rose silk with centre 
of metallic thread in a very lacy stitch. 

There was little new in the line of 
most of the models. An exception is a 
sweater with fancy border, high neck 
and tight sleeves, the novelty lying in 
the opening on either side to the bust 
line in the form of a square piece. 

A sweater combining knitting with 
crocheting has a yoke and border of cro- 
chet in the form of a loose filet stitch 
and raised designs in clusters of grapes 
and foliage. 

Among the children's knitted frocks 
of distinction was a model in yellow with 
fulled pieces at the sides edged with 
white angora yarn. Another model also 
in yellow for an older child has the sides 
knitted in the form of pleats and applied 
to the bodice in the form of cartridge 
pleats. 

In addition to the knitted jumpers and 
frocks, there was also a class devoted to 
jumpers of fabrics, more interesting as 
specimens of fine needlework than for 
designs. The prize winner was a mahog- 
any crepe de Chine overblouse edged 
with a three-inch band of fine knife 
pleating with an embroidered panel in 
self tones, back and front outlined on 
either side with curved designs of the 
crepe de Chine fagoted together. 

These are but a few of the many in- 
teresting models which were displayed 
by mannequins for two days and were 
viewed by many thousands of people. 



CHAMPION KNITTER: AGED 

MILTON LADY IS CALLED 

BY DEATH 

Mrs. Christopher Curry, the old- 
est resident of Milton, died on Sun- 
day, January 16, in her ninety- 
eighth year. Though born in Ire- 
land, she had lived here practically 
all her life, settling on a farm near 
Milton in the early pioneer days. 

All her life Mrs. Curry was a 
champion knitter, and carried off 
prizes at many of the Fairs in the 
district. Some five years ago she 
won the prize for knitting at the 
Canadian National Exhibition. 

Mrs. Curry is survived by three 
sons, John, James and Christopher, 
and by one daughter, Mrs. Walsh. 






Dry Goods Review 



Canadian Toy Industry Advancing 

Over Million Dollars' Worth of Toys Imported by Dominion Last Year — Many German Products 

on the Market — Cheaper But of Inferior Quality — American Industry Making Great 

Progress — Where Canadian Toys Can be Improved to Meet Popular Demand. 



CONDITIONS in the toy markets of 
the world will undoubtedly be 
typified in the coming American 
Toy Fair to be held in New York in Feb- 
ruary next. The features which are 
spoken of as outstanding- this year are 
unusual and are indicative of the fact 
that 1921 will witness a practical demon- 
stration of the principle of the survival 
of the fittest, so far as toys are con- 
cerned. 

In every country, financial pressure 
has weeded out those concerns which are 
not really fitted or properly equipped 
for the manufacture of toys. War con- 
ditions made it possible for toy manufac- 
turers of a certain class to get by when 
they could not possibly do so under nor- 
mal conditions. 

Novelties will not be a pronounced fea- 
ture of the 1921 showing for the reason 
that few manufacturers feel justified in 
introducing anything new in the strictest 
sense of the word just now, nevertheless, 
many of the best lines have been so sta- 
bilized and standardized by the experi- 
ence of the last few years that they are 
practically new goods. Progress is con- 
stantly being made in all popular lines of 
toys, such as dolls, for example. The 
walking doll is expected to attract much 
attention during the coming year, and is 
being shown in a large variety of styles 
and prices. The outstanding feature of 
the American jointed doll is good model- 
ling, strength and proper proportions. 

The mechanical toy is another line to 
show remarkable improvement of late. 
The range is now so wide as to include 
practically everything that will be 
wanted at prices varying from a few 
cents to many dollars. 

German Toys 

With regard to the anticipated influx 
of German-made toys into the Canadian 
market, much information of interest is 
given in an article in "Playthings" which 
considers the situation from an Amer- 
ican standpoint, quite in keeping with 
the views of Canadian buyers. 

"There is no doubt whatsoever that a 
very considerable quantity of German 
toys reached the American market dur- 
ing 1920. These toys came in strange 
ways and in many cases the toys were 
strange and unreal to those who saw 
them. The toys came, they were seen, 
and in vast numbers of cases were sim- 
ply smiled at. It was quite apparent 
that Germany had given more attention 
to world conquest than to toy designing 
since 1913. There was nothing new and 
the toys were flimsy to an outrageous 
degree, toys that were smothered in 
;. int until their usefulness was utterly 



destroyed, mechanical toys whose mech- 
anism failed and whose construction was 
faulty. 

"A record is made of one case where 
twelve German toys were bought and 
where reductions had to be made on 
seven of them because of imperfections. 
The modern child has progressed far 
beyond the things that amused children 
of even half a generation ago. Toys with 
a meaning, toys with a purpose, toys 
that have an educational value and that 
can be used to some real advantage are 
the things that children want. Dealers 
will find that it is not the mere question 
of price which will decide — it is the atti- 
tude of the children. In the last analysis 
it is always the consumer that creates 
the market. It is not the buyer whose 
memory goes back to years gone by and 
whose recollection of a pleasant ocean 
trip and a congenial sojourn in Nurem- 
burg might tempt him abroad this year. 

"The modern boy can become what he 
chooses; he can be an engineer, a doctor, 
a mechanic; he can be anything, and the 
life of the girl is parallel with it. The 
little foreign child who is born in the 
household of a carpenter, a bricklayer or 
a hodcarrier expects to grow up and be a 
carpenter, bricklayer or a day laborer. 
His play is confined to those lines as his 
future seems to be. Perhaps that is the 
reason why German toys have stood still 
and American toys have gone forward." 

Lower Prices 

As regards buying for the coming 
season, there is undoubtedly a tendency 
among toy men to look for lower prices 
and to postpone buying indefinitely in 



the hope of securing price concessions. A 
few are working on the principle that if 
raw materials in general have gone 
down, toys must inevitably follow suit in 
the near future. As one expert puts it: 

"If the toy buyer will figure out the 
price of clothing, of shoes, of almost any 
such article, and then alongside these 
figures let him place the prices of toys in 
1913, 1919 and 1920, it is probable that 
the result will surprise him, and he will 
be sure to discover that the prices of 
toys in the Spring of 1920 did not show 
as much advance over the 1913 prices as 
the prices of cotton, wool and leather 
goods, even at the reduced rates in the 
last months of 1920, showed over the 
1913 prices. In other words, many lines 
went up with a tremendous bound and 
came back with a corresponding slump, 
but, taken right straight through the 
market, toys showed no such advances 
and cannot possibly show any corre- 
sponding decline." 

Here is where the insidious danger of 
the return of the German toy lurks. 
Whether or not Germany will succeed, by 
underselling, in getting back a large 
share of its outside toy business remains 
to be seen. Labor is the chief problem 
confronting the industry in this country, 
but if this difficulty is overcome and the 
cost of production is kept at anything 
like the German level, the toy industries 
in the countries of the Allies should in- 
crease rather than suffer a loss in their 
business. 

It has been found difficult to make 
dolls with faces at all comparable with 
those turned out by the Germans before 
the war. The Japanese, for example, 




From Merry England 



This group of precocious personalities from Toy land were created in the Old 
Country by men occupied in the art of making "funnies" for the junior world, 
and imported by Jas. Ogilvy & Co., Montreal. 



}>rij Goodi Hi i'" (V 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



L61 



manufacture dolls cheaply, but the faces 
have not been attractive, although some 
improvement is noticed) this year. But 
British, French, Japanese and Americans 
arc confident that their dolls will soon 
have laces as pretty as the German 
product; and it is also contended that 
their materials are stronger and more 
satisfactory than those employed in the 
German factories. The doll industry is 
SO important and so profitable and the 
demand since the Armistice has so far 
tied the supply that hopes of suc- 
are well founded. 
It was estimated recently that four- 
fifths of the toys shown by retailers in 
the United States during the Christmas 
season were of American manufacture. 
It was estimated that more than 1,500 
large and small toy factories were oper- 
ating in the republic and that their total 
business this year would amount to be- 
tween $30,000,000 and $50,000,000. In 
1914 it was $20,000,000, less than that 
figure. The American toy factories are 
consuming 50,000,000 feet of lumber this 
year and this lumber is the choicest in 
the market. 

Canada's Toy Industry 

Canada has made considerable advance 
compared with pre-war times, in this re- 
gard, but the domestic demand is by no 
means fully met by Canadian factories. 
There are at present about 15 factories 
in operation which turn out products 
whose selling value at the works is esti- 
mated at $405,369. But the Dominion 
required during the past year an addi- 
tional $1,500,000 worth of toys to supple- 
ment the output of Canadian factories. 
Last year Canada exported $139,052 
worth of domestic dolls and toys. 

Dry Goods Review has interviewed a 
number of toy department managers this 
month with a view to ascertaining the 
prevailing conditions following the 
Christmas season. In every case the re- 
ports were of a favorable nature, indi- 
cating that sales were quite up to normal 
despite the wave of economy prevailing. 
One manager reported that the higher 
priced toys did not sell so readily but the 
cheaper lines went very quickly during 
the last week before Christmas. One 
curious aspect of the pre-Christmas sell- 
ing was mentioned by this buyer, which 
threw a new light upon the attitude of 
the buying public. He stated that little 
or no Christmas toy buying was done in 
his store during the daytime but that 
every night the department was crowded 
by parents or more particularly fathers 
in search of the needful articles for the 
tree or the stocking. In other years, the 
store "Santa Claus" had his hands de- 
cidedly full looking after the youngsters 
who crowded in to meet him, but this 
year, the same enthusiasm was not so 
manifest. And furthermore, when the 
fathers came to make their purchases 
there was little evidence of the open- 
handedness and extravagant buying 
which formerly characterized other sea- 
sons. Instead they candidly informed 




the manager that business was poor with 
them and they were obliged to curtail 
their Christmas expenditures this season. 
In this respect most toy sections suffered 
somewhat, although all kinds of toys are 
fairly well reduced in quantity. 

Another store interviewed stated that 
educational toys and children's furniture 
were very slow, and that toy phono- 
graphs, so popular in 1919, were a drug 
on the market this season. 

For All Year Round Trade 

All the buyers emphasized the fact 
that it would be greatly to the advantage 
of all concerned if Canadian manufac- 
turers could adapt themselves to the 
making of toys all the year round and. 
not confine their efforts to one or two 
lines, which have only a seasonal appeal. 
One of the biggest forces to set the Can- 
adian toy industry on its feet is the 
movement for all the year round toy 
selling. Hitherto, manufacturers have 
quoted prices in February for toys de- 
liverable in the following October, or in 
time for the Christmas season. This has 
resulted in many cancellations of orders, 
as in the months ensuing between Feb- 
ruary and October costs of materials are 
subject to considerable change. 

With all the year round manufacture 
and sale of toys the industry would be 
stabilized and expert toy makers and de- 
signers would be given employment 
throughout the year. 

One of the first things the Canadian 
manufacturer has to learn is to finish 
his toys with the best materials and con- 
struction possible. His paint should be 
of the glossiest and most vivid shades; 
his wheeled goods should be solidly built 
to stand the strain of motion; his metal 
work should be smooth and free from 
sharp corners. Another minor fault, 
which nevertheless prejudices buyers in 
favor of imported goods, is the habit of 
Canadian makers to leave the bottoms of 
toy carts, cars, etc., unpainted. This 
means very little saving in the end but 
is frequently the factor which makes or 
spoils a sale of a certain toy. A cleverly 
designed and strongly built tank model 
would have been exceedingly popular 
with parents this season had it been fin- 
ished underneath. As it was, the major- 
ity of shoppei*s chose an American made 
toy cart or car because it was enamelled 
in several bright colors all over and had 
a surface as smooth as satin. 

As all the buyers interviewed agreed, 
the toy department is the one essential 



section in every progressive store nowa- 
days. It is the best and only means of 
bringing into the building the many 
youngsters who will be the customers of 
the future. Take the example of the 
James Ogilvy store in Montreal. Until 
1920 the toy section in this busy store 
was quiet and not as popular during the 
greater part of the year as it should 
have been. The general manager decided 
to move it down to the first floor, incor- 
porate it with the baby's section and 
close at hand to the kiddies' hair cutting 
shop, so that everything appertaining to 
children would be all together. Within 
twelve months the section has expanded 
and is now among the largest upon the 
floor. Each section of the juvenile de- 
partment has a beneficial effect upon the 
others and sales in all three have jumped 
amazingly. An inspection of the several 
aisles following the installation of the 
new toy section demonstrates the fact 
that playthings are an essential and in- 
tegral part of any store, and the careful 
arrangement of seasonable goods will 
keep interest constantly at concert pitch. 
It is the intention of this manager to 
clear out left-over Christmas stock and 
display wheeled goods and outdoor toys 
for Easter selling. Later on, in May and 
June, there will be a delightful showing 
of seaside and summer play toys includ- 
ing sporting goods, and finally when 
school opens again and evenings draw in. 
he will feature all the newest games and 
educational toys which will lead natur- 
ally up to the Christmas season again. 
Demonstrations of various types of toys 
are features of this active dspartment, 
and undoubtedly do much to awaken in- 
terest on the part of the youthful cus- 
tomers. Demonstrations tend to create 
a more informal spirit and establish a 
closer bond of interest between the chil- 
dren and the sales staff. 



WALMER'S CASTLES 

The work of disabled ex-soldiers is be- 
ing given much prominence in many of 
the shops which feature a wide range 
of toys. Not only are there hand-made 
toys from the Old Country convalescent 
depots, but the products of Canadian 
ex-service men are also on sale. Most 
of these toys are wooden and their main 
quality is originality and novelty. In 
one instance, the idea of the well-known 
metal "Meccano" and an Australian 
method of house construction in the 
"bush" are combined in the production of 
a toy which is educative, conducive of 
mental development, and requires exacti- 
tude in its application. Known as "Wal- 
mer's Castle," these toys are made by 
Canadian veterans and featured in the 
wonderful display at G. A. Holland & 
Son Co. 



SHARP DECLINE REPORTED 

Prices showed sharp declines the open- 
ing days of the New York Fur Auction 
Sales. Average prices showed a drop 
of from 40 to 60 per cent, as compared 
with April figures. 



102 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry Goods Review 




Let This Big Factory Make Money For You 



THE De Long factory is making money 
for thousands of retail merchants — be- 
cause it greatly increases their stock turnover. 

Why not let it do this for you? It can start 
putting profits into your pocket the day you 
start carrying the De Long line — De Long 
Snaps, De Long Hooks and Eyes, De Long 
Hook and Eye Tape, De Long Safety Pins, 
De Long Toilet Pins, and De Long Hair Pins 
— the notions women know. 

Advertising in the Ladies' Home Journal, 
Butterick Quarterlies, Elite Styles, Needle- 
craft, etc., is constantly reminding women of 
De Long notions. 



In addition, great numbers of women who 
are already satisfied users of De Long pro- 
ducts couldn't be switched from them under 
any circumstances. 

Of these two great groups of buyers and 
prospective buyers there are bound to be 
enough right in your neighborhood to bring 
you considerable trade — if you put De Long 
products on display. 

Begin now. Order from your jobber or 
send direct. When ordering, ask for our 
latest price list, which describes and illus- 
trates everything we make. 



DeLong 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 



Hook 
&Eye 



Company 

ST. MARYS, ONTARIO 



/// •// Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



L63 



Knitting Wools 



WE HAVE ALL QUALITIES 
IN ALL SHADES 

at 
RIGHT PRICES 



Shetland Floss 
Sweater Wool 
Golf Wool 
Andalusians 



Saxony 
Fingerings 
Utility 
Zephyrs 



BUY THREE BEE and GLORIA BRAND 
WOOLS 

Spring Range of Stamped Dresses 
and Rompers Now Ready 

Instruction Books on Knitting and Crocheting 

HAMBLY and WILSON 

LIMITED 

11 WELLINGTON ST. W. 
TORONTO 



Specializing in 

House Dresses, Children's Dresses, 

Apron Dresses, Rompers 

and Creepers. 

Spring Samples now in hands 
of our representatives. 

. Better made garments . 

— > c i & < — 

tor less money. 

"Prompt Delivery our Motto" 

Canadian Perfect Garment Company 

MANUFACTURERS 
513-515 College Street. Toronto Tel. Coll. 8928 





WM. E. WRIGHT SAYS 

" There are five good reasons 
why the quality of 



SI 



has been steadily maintained and why it will be 
kept at the same high level for many yeai's to 
come. These five reasons are my five sons, all 
of them directors in the company and devoting 
their whole time to its welfare. 




W. F. WRIGHT F. W. WRIGHT H. L. WRIGHT 



Vice-Pres. 



Sec'y and Treas. 



Sales Mgr. 





J. T. WRIGHT 

Factory Sup't 



C. A. WRIGHT 

Ass*t Factory Sup't 



It may interest some of our friends to know 
that a third generation of Wright boys is 
growing up and will in time be able to carry 
on the business." 



Wm.E.Wright&SonsCo., Mf rs . 

315-317 Church Street New York 

Stock* carried at all Agencies 
CHICAGO ST. LOUIS 

R. C. TAFT CO. GEO. F. ANDERSONS SON 

223 W. Jackson Boulevard 613 North Broad war 

PHILADELPHIA 

JAMES F. McCARRIAR 
1011 Chestnut Street 



WRIGHT'S 

BIAS FOLD TAPE 

k . It (urns itself . 



In U.S. Pat. Off. 



lt'.l 



DRY HOODS UK VIEW 



Of Interest to Every Canadian 

Number One of a Series of Advertisements 

Efficient service is the keynote of membership of 

DRY GOODS REVIEW 

—IN— 

Canadian National Newspapers and Periodicals Association 

— a highly constructive service — absolute ly dependable and devoid of prejudice and 
personal bias. It means much to you! 

The policies and principles back of this irr portant service enable you to secure prac- 
tical and impartial information of great value in business and in the home: and 
they assure a ready fund of literature of exceptionally high standard at all times. 
To read the Association's Standards of Practice listed herewith is to understand 
what this Association means to you. 



Standards of Practice 

Canadian National Newspapers and Periodicals Association 



THE Members of this Association 
shall dedicate their best efforts 
to the cause of business, and public 
service, and to this end shall pledge 
themselves: 

To consider first the interests of 
the Subscriber. 

O To work for truth and honesty 

• ' in all departments. 

2 To eliminate, in so far as pos- 
sible, their personal opinions 
from their news columns, but be 
leaders in thought in their editorial 
columns, and make their criticisms 
constructive. 

J. To refuse to publish puffs, free 
reading notices, or paid write- 
ups, to keep their reading columns 
independent of advertising consider- 
ations, and to measure all news by 
the standard "Is it real news?" 



C To decline any advertisement 
which has a tendency to mis- 
lead, or which does not conform to 
business integrity. 

/C To solicit subscriptions and ad- 

* vertising solely upon the merits 
of the publication. 

7 To supply advertisers with full 
information regarding character 
and extent of circulation, including 
detailed circulation statements, sub- 
ject to proper authentic verification 
Q To co-operate with all organiz- 

* ations and individuals engaged 
in creative advertising work. 

Q To avoid unfair competition. 

1 A To determine what is the 
* highest and largest function 
in the field which they serve, and 
then to strive, in every legitimate 
way, to promote that function. 



This is Number One of a series of advertisements regarding an Association that typifies 
thorough-going Canadian stability. Read the forthcoming advertisements in the Maga- 
zines, and Agricultural, Business, Religious and Educational newspapers, and Technical 
newspapers. 

Canadian National Newspapers and Periodicals Association 

Office - 70 Lombard Street - Toronto, Ontario 




osiery. 



high quality silk hose — 

sheer enough to delight 

any woman. Butterfly Silk 

Hosiery is handsomely packed 

—a strong selling feature. 

G( A range of 1 5 perfect shades 
— three grades of silk. 

Q The best fitting hosiery made 
today anywhere. 

Q And it sells at a moderate 
price. 

Now made 111 Canada by 

THE BUTTERFLY HOSIERY 
CO. LIMITED 

DRUMMONDVILLE 
QUE. 






A 




Complete Range 










Butterfly Silk Hosiery 

How many sales are lost because your sales 
people cannot satisfy a customer with a cer- 
tain make of goods in the exact, shade, size 
and quality desired? 

This is one of the strongest appeals of Butter- 
fly Silk Hosiery to the modern dealer. Under 
the one name "Butterfly" (registered trade- 
mark), which a woman grows to know and 
appreciate, you can meet her demand for three 
grades, 15 shades, and all sizes from 8K up. 

You can supply Butterfly in pure Japan 
Silk, in Art Silk, and in a mixture of the 
two — all grades unquestionably the best 
in their class. 

The fifteen shades give you a range more 

complete than you could find in any other line of 

good quality silk hosiery in Canada. 

There are four greys alone, so that you can give 

just what your trade wants. 

And "Butterfly" Hosiery is a Canadian product. 

throughout. 

YOUR JOBBER CAN SUPPLY YOU 

Made in Canada by 

THE BUTTERFLY HOSIERY CO. LIMITED 

DRUMMONDVILLE, QUEBEC 




Sole Selling Agents : E. H 

TORONTO MONTREAL 



Walsh fe? Company Limited 

WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLA Y 



167 




Burrows & Sanborn believe in keeping 
Store Service equipment up-to-date 



BURROWS & SANBI )RN recently installed a com- 
plete system of Lamson Improved Cable Carriers 
in their up-to-date department store in Lynn, 
Mass. Sixty-seven stations are arranged -to handle cash, 
charge, and all other ^ales in their selling departments. 

In giving his reasons for installing this Lamson equip- 
ment, Mr. Sanborn says: "We have used Lamson 
Service for over a dozen years with entire satisfaction, 
but when the Lamson brought out their new and im- 
proved Crossover Cable Carrier we realized that it was 
just what we needed in our store. 

"Our system was laid out by the Lamson Company to 
give us maximum service everywhere. In the busy 
first floor counters, three to five stations are provided in 
each 40-foot fixture. Equally ample service is installed 
at bargain tables and wall counters so that our clerks 



are always near a service point, and can handle our 
business quickly and easily. 

'"We particularly like the way our carriers reduce our 
difficulties of supervision and make our entire business 
safe and easy to handle. All cash and charge slips are 
in the central desk before the merchandise is delivered 
to the customer, so that our losses from shortages of 
cash and lost charge slips are negligible. In addition, 
the clerks like the service, as they are not bothered 
with making change and do not have to worry about 
bow their cash is coming out at the end of the day. 

"We cheerfully recommend Lamson Improved Service, 
as we believe that it will enable any merchant with 
a^store like ours to handle his business easily and with 
fewer losses tban where the cash is scattered about the 
store." 



The Lamson Company 

100 BOYLSTON. BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston 100 Bovlston St. 

New York 11-11 East 37th St. 

Philadelphia 210 North Broad St. 

Pittsburgh 319 Third Ave. 

Baltimore Equitable Building 

Rochester 194 East Main St. 



New Orleans, 227 Bourboru St. 



Branches and Service Stations 



Detroit 525 Woodward Ave. 

Cleveland 2063 East 4th St. 

Cincinnati 119 East 5th St. 

Indianapolis. Cor. Washington and Illinois 
Los Angeles 221 San Fernando Bldg. 



Chicago B North Michigan Ave. 

Omaha 418 McCague Bldg. 

Minneapolis 320 Tribune Annex 

San Francisco 617 Mission St. 

St. Louis 709 Pine St. 



Additional Service Stations 

Albany, 22 So. Pearl St. P.uffalo. 194 Main St. 



Toronto 136 Simcoe St. 

Vancouver, B.C 603 Hastings St. 

Dallas 905% Elm St. 

Seattle 215 Stewart St. 

Washington. DC. .....426 Colorado Bldg. 

Atlanta 30 Moore Bldg. 



Kansas City. 210 New Untge Bldg. 



Lamson it*mm> Service 



Flexibility Economy 



ics 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



Dry Goods Review 




Fair-weathers, Ltd., of Toronto 

can claim on< of the highest aggregations of effective window display s-f or 1920: F.G.R. 
Lacey, display manager for tliis exclusive Toronto firm, introduced during the year a 
series of remarkable lingerie and corset windows, a number of which hare been repro- 
duced in Dry Goods Review to show what con be accomplished by the artistic handling 
of dainty undergarments and the various accessories of boudoir attire. Several of these 
vindows captured prizes in contests held daring the year. 

The accompanying illustrations show two of the effective Fall Opening windows ar- 
ranged by Mr. Lacey, in which afternoon and evening models arc featured, accompanied 
by effective grouping of exquisite accessories. Handsome furnishings and incidental 
appointments chosen with the utmost care male the winpldws of this exclusive Yonge 
Street store among the most attractive in the city. 




/>/•(/ Guods l!< 



L69 



Boosting the Average Size of a Sale 

(leorge Hutchings, General Manager of Stanley Mills Ltd., oi Hamilton, Explains How His 
, Firm Established Three Big Records in the Year of Depression, 1920. 



"I 



F you send for the people they will 
come." The late Timothy Eaton 
as a merchant made few mistakes. 
His accuracy in the psychology of selling 
was unrivalled. It is little wonder that 
many of his^ comments made during a 
long and spectacular career should have 
been accepted by other merchants as 
part of their business creed. But the 
above statement characteristic of the 
grand old merchant prince is one which 
has been heeded by many men who are 
now marshalling big businesses to great- 
er success. The Stanley Mills Company, 
of Hamilton, is one of the up-to-date 
stores of Ontario which puts great faith 
in this adage. 

Three Records This Year 

On this conviction the Stanley Mills 
firm has defied discouraging influences, 
pessimism and long periods of reluc- 
tancy on the part of the buying public 
during the past twelve months, and as 
a result when there were plenty of mer- 
chants complaining about bad business 
and "rotten conditions" this enterprising- 
organization emerged from the gloom of 
the 1920 depression with three genuine 
records to their credit. Here they are: 

In December the firm had the largest 
day's business in the year. 

December was the biggest all round 
month of the year. 

And in 1920 the Stanley Mills Com- 
pany enjoyed the largest volume of busi- 
ness the firm has ever known. 

Dry Goods Review was permitted to 
see the records of the house. On the 
second day before Christmas 19,000 peo- 
ple shopped in the Stanley Mills store 
and this day's sales returns registered 
$24,000. Before the war the avei-age 
sale per person was 40„ cents — an in- 
crease of 212 1 / £ per cent. Even taking 
into consideration the increased scale of 
prices which did a continuous climb dur- 
ing the war, this store admits that it 
required some hustling to create this 
new sales standard. 

Psychology of Selling 

"You can't sit down to business," said 
George Hutchins, general manager of the 
store, when discussing the year's busi- 
ness with a representative of a Dry 
Goods Review staff at the first of the 
month. "We can't say anything but 
that business has been simply wonderful 
— depression or no depression — but we 
certainly wouldn't for one minute infer 
that we didn't work hard to establish 
the records referred to." 

"How did you do it?" he was asked. 

Secret No Secret 

"By practising consistency, giving 
value and introducing goods," was the 
reply. "We did not make one sacrifice 
reduction on any line. At Christmas 



time we did not reduce the price of one 
toy. While other firms reduced their 
toys to half price, we priced our toys 
fairly and kept them there, and Christ- 
mas Eve we had the biggest sale of 
toys in the history of the store. It was 




J. P. STEEDMAN 

President of the Stanley Mills Company 

of Hamilton, Ont. 




GEO. HUTCHINGS, 
General Manager of the Stanley Mills Store, 
who established three big records for his 
firm in 1920. 



the same in all our lines. \\ • told the 
public in our daily ads what we had and 
what it was selling at. When they 
reached the store they found that things 
were as they had been represei ted. The 
prices were what they had expected and 
good value was given. When we got 
them in the store we had no difficulty^ 
keeping them there. Our sales staff 
work hard and deserve the utmost credil 
for their excellent co-operat- 

Mr. Hutchings explained in detail the 
stores policy in getting more business, 
in effecting increased buying on the part 
of the customer, or in other words, in 
"boosting the average size of a sale." 

"Every member of our. sales staff — 
which numbers 300 with 400 at the rush 
holiday seasons — is taken into the firm's 
confidence. They are instilled with a 
sense of responsibility, and appreciate 
that efficiency, intelligence and a willing- 
ness to apply themselves brings recogni- 
tion and promotion. Our conferences 
and courses of instruction are one of our 
biggest selling factors, and in this re- 
spect we impress the value of a personal 
interest being established between the 
salesman or woman and the customer. 
We try to have men and women who have 
made good in some particular way — in 
Canada — speak to our sales staff at our 
regular meetings which are held in the 
Stanley mills building. All the sales 
problems of the day, week and month are 
studied and thrashed out. The individ- 
ual case is given special consideration, 
and the art of selling is held up as an 
art to the men and women in our em- 
ploy." 

Studying Types in Customers 
"In this way." continued Mr. Hutch- 
ings," we get our staff personally inter- 
ested in their own personalities, and en- 
courage them to try out possible capa- 
bilities that they may not have known 
existed. 

"We instruct them in the proper way 
of approaching the customer. (You see 
there are all kinds of customers, and 
what may be good for one customer will 
not be good for another. Let me explain 
this point farther. Supper a very irate 
old gentleman walks up to a rather 
pretty clerk who is inclined to be 
friendly. He will in all probability work 
himself into a temper over her 'forward 
attitude' and perhaps resent the manage- 
ment employing 'such a type of girl.' This 
same little girl greeting a rather shy 
young housewife with her winning- smile, 
would in all probability win a customer 
for life. We try to teach this physho- 
logy of selling to all our clerks from the 
youngest to the most trustworthy em- 
ployee on the staff. 

Continued on page 199 



170 Dry Goods Review 

Canadian Women's Wear Windows 

Effective Displays Noted in Leading Cities of the Dominion Representing Kxpert Work of 

Prominent Display Men Employed on the Staffs of Large Departmental Stores — 

The Appeal of the Well-trimmed Window. 



THfc: following descriptions briefly 
given by Ernest A. Dench, a fre- 
quent contributor to Dry Goods Re- 
view, are taken from reports made on a 
recent tour by the writer of many of the 
leading cities of Quebec, Ontario and the 
The displays described give many 
excellent suggestions for Spring opening 
windows and describe in detail effective 
backgrounds, required equipment and the 
arresting placing of forms and garments 
displayed. 

Effective Suit Trim 

Henry Morgan & Co., Montreal, exe- 
cuted an attractive display of women's 
suits. The 'permanent green rear and 
side panels were left untouched save for 
a Gainsborough painting hung at the 
rear center. At the right rear stood a 
blue shaded stand lamp, while near the 
lamp was a blue" and cream colored jar- 
diniere, in which a potted palm was set. 
Over to the middle was a brown suit on 
a headless figure. A little to the left was 
a long walnut table, with a potted palm 
in a green jardiniere on right end of the 
table. The jardiniere was draped with 
billows of blue satin, while a pair of 
brown kid gloves was placed over the 
palm. On the left end of the table was a 
tall stand, on which rested a hat. The 
brim of the hat was of brown and the 
frame of blue, with chocolate brown veil- 
ing running over the sides of the hat. 
At the far left rear was a brown suit on 
a headless figure. Stationed at each 
front side near the center was a walnut 
• ■hair, upholstered in blue. On the seat 
of the chair, over a pedestal, was a brown 
hat, with its blue and green veiling 
draped over the chair seat. Laid over 
the other chair at the front right was a 
dark brown suit, with gloves and foot- 
wear to match. Headless figures in suits 
of brown were located at each far front 
side, near which the following cards were 
laid: 

''Distinctive Suits for the Winter 

Season." 

"Suits of Supreme Quality in 

Shades of Brown." 

The Scenic Setting 
Goodwins, Ltd., Montreal, adorned the 
rear of one of their show windows with 
a large painted set of a rural harvest 
moon scene. Blue satin curtains were 
draped at each side to impart a stage 
setting effect. Green painted steps led 
up to the stage setting, with an orange 
lounge bolster and a brown fur neck 
piece laid at the foot of the second step. 
Pillars at each side of the steps were or- 
namented with gilt tops. Near the side 



of each pillar was a green stand, sur- 
mounted by a bronze lamp. The rear 
panelling at each side of the painted set 
was executed in alternate oblong blocks 
of grey and apple green. Such was the 
effective setting arranged for a display 
of coats and suits for present wear. The 
garments were exhibited both on head- 
less figures as well as over blue brocaded 
pieces of walnut furniture. 

A Study in Blue 

Darwin's, Ottawa, Ont., placed a white 
brocaded gilt chair at the rear center of 
a trim devoted to blue dresses. Hung 
across the chair was a navy blue dress 
on a coat hanger. The dress was laid 
in such a manner as to suggest that it 
was being worn by a girl while sitting 
down. The illusion might have been com- 
pleted by placing a pair of silk hose and 
shoes by the hem of the dress, which 



escaped the floor by about a foot. Behind ■ 
the chair was a tall pedestal, on top of 
which rested a maroon duvetyne hat. 
The crook end of the dress hanger, on 
which the blue dress hung, was fastened 
to the pedestal, about six inches from 
the top. At each rear side was a full 
length headless figure, clad in a blue 
dress. Down in front were blue dresses 
on stands, the garments falling to the 
floor. 

A French Effect 

J. Pharand, Hull, Que., enclosed a win- 
dow at the back with a lattice-work set- 
ting, the architecture of which suggested 
open French windows with a roomy bal- 
cony outside. The glimpse of the bal- 
cony that could be seen through the open 
window was covered with trailing flow- 
ers. Inside the lattice-work opening, at 
the middle, was a brown costume suiting 




A Canadian-made Figure 

One of the lines of -wax mannequins new being designed and 
manufactured in Canada which formerly had to be imported. — 
Shown by courtesy of Messrs. Del fosse & Co., Montreal. 



Dry Goods Review 



KQUH'MKNT AND DISPLAY 



171 




Shown on Christmas Eve 



This beautiful and impressive tableau was conceived and executed by Chalmers Nicholls, the well-known display man- 
ager of the Cressman Company, Peterborough, and was the subject of many complimentary comments by those who passed 
before the store on Christmas Eve. The lighting effects were lovely and the figures, which are not done justice in the repro- 
duction, were remarkable. The scene represents the Wise Men being guided by the star to the manger, where the Christ 
child lies. 



<^n a T-stand, which was poised on an up- 
right fixture, the base being- draped with 
billows of the brown suiting. 

Art With a Capital "A" 

R. E. Walker & Co., Fort William, 
Ont., had a three-wing screen at the rear 
center. The screen was painted in silver, 
with circular insertions of each wing- 
executed in emerald green, bordered with 
black. A drape of green chiffon hung 
at each side of the screen. The middle 
wing of the screen contained a broad 
black velvet bow, with three ends of 
various lengths extending to the floor. 
The first reached a little beyond the floor, 
while the second hung a little further 
ahead of the first, and the third extended 
to the left front corner, where there was 
a low cassock. The sides were painted 
in silver, with a green chiffon top, plus a 
narrow border of black velvet. In the 
middle of this attractive bit of furniture 
was a gilt stand, surmounted by a black 
yelour hat, trimmed with green feathers. 
On the left was a small wicker basket 
of metallic berries, chiefly of silver. On 
the far right end of the hassock was laid 
a drape of green chiffon, coming from 
the top right rear, forming billows across 
the end and running in a circle to the 
left rear, where it caught up the other 
rear drape at the side of the screen. In 
front arranged in between the left and 
middle wings of the screen was a tubu- 
lar vase, executed in green with a black 
border and filled with tapering sprays of 
silver painted berries. At the front cen- 
ter the card announcing the latest fash- 
ions was cut out of silver cardboard, with 
a portion removed in the middle to per- 
mit of the admittance of a piece of green 
chiffon, over which the announcement 
was painted in black. 

At the top of the card were a few 
sprays of silver leaves, bunched with a 
head of black ribbon reaching to the 
floor. At the front right was a dark 



brown wicker lounge, relaxing on which 
was a wax model, attired in a stylish 
green evening dress, with her black rib- 
bon sash reaching to the floor.' The win- 
dow was floored with a plain apple green 
carpet. This artistic display was con- 
ceived and executed by Mr. It. C. Hall. 

A Sale of Six Suits 

Chappies, Fort William, Ont., solved 
the problem of cleaning out six suits of a 
particular kind by a window display. The 
card calling attention to this limited sale 
announced: 

"WEDNESDAY— Suits, $39.75. There 
are only six of them." 

At the rear center came two full- 
length wax figures, one garbed in a dark 



BIEGE AND GRAY REGISTER 
AS RACES AT NICE BEGIN 

Paris. — The opening of the racing 
season at Nice has been character- 
ized by cool and rather cloudy wea- 
ther with the result that few light 
colored frocks and hats have made 
their appearance. Among the 
lighter shades that do register, 
however, are gray and biege for the 
leading colors. 

Short box coats are very pop- 
lar, trimmed with fur and embroid- 
ery, while in millinery toques with 
the highpointed front treatment 
are still holding great favor, de- 
veloped in both straw and crepe, 
in light colors. On black straw- 
hats is noted the repeated use of a 
veil to the nose. 

Some fur hats are seen, with 
many fur coats, worn with the 
light dresses. Among dresses of 
this type, the Chanel crepe types, 
with double pleated skirts are still 
strong. 

Among the suit models, Renee 
and Lanvin interpretations of the 
shortcoated type are good. 



blue suit and the other model in a grey 
specimen. Veils and hats to correspond 
were added. Additional models, one at 
each rear side, showed off nut brown and 
chocolate brown suits to excellent ad- 
vantage. The space at each front side 
was taken up by a blue serge skirt 
draped over a hanger. A blue serge coat 
was laid over a hanger at the front 
center. 

An Example From the West 

Hudson's Bay Co., Edmonton, Alta., 
had an attractive window exhibit of 
women's coats. There was a very tall gilt 
stand, lamp, topped by a purple shade, 
at the center rear. A rosette was formed 
in the middle of the stand part of the 
lamp with folds of dark grey taffeta. 
The grey was relieved by an occasional 
yellow flower printed on the taffeta. The 
taffeta parted ways to each front side. 
At the front left was a full-length head- 
less model, attired in a very becoming 
nut brown coat with a fur collar. At 
the center front there was a nigger 
brown coat draped over a brass hanger, 
the tail ends of the garments lying over 
the floor. On the floor each side of (.he 
coat was a pair of shoes, one of black for 
evening wear, the other of brown high 
footwear. At the front right was a black 
velvet hat, with a handbag placed here 
and there on the floor. 



OPEN STORE IN MONTREAL 

The R. L. Steel Company have opened 
a store at the corner of St. Andra and 
St. Catherine St. E. Montreal. 



ELECTED TO AD CLUB 

H. H. Clark, of the C. Kenyon Com- 
pany, has been elected president of the 
newly organized advertising club of the 
Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce. 



172 



Dry Goods Review 



Keep the Window Clear of Frost 

Merchants in all Parts of the Country are Now Confronted With One of Their Worst Annoy 
ances — Every Precaution Should be Taken to Do Away With "Freezing'' of One of 
the Most Valuable Advertising Assets the Store Has. 



NOW that the winter months are at 
hand merchants in all parts of 
the country are faced with the 
old trouble of window freezing. As 
this is one of the worst annoyances the 
store keepers have to contend with in 
the winter every precaution should be 
taken. Windows that are covered with 
frost are as bad as no windows at all 
and. realizing this, a number of mer- 
chants in different parts of the coun- 
try have asked Dry Goods Review for 
pointers on the art of keeping the win- 
dows clear. Herewith are presented 
some tips which the merchant who is 
troubled with frosted windows might 
find useful. 

The methods usually advised to pre- 
vent the deposition of moisture and frost 
on window-panes are the employnent of 
double windows, or the coating of the 
glass with some one of the various 
liquids which have been recommended 
for the purpose. Another very efficient 
measure is said to be a small fan, and 
so placed as to blow directly upon the 
glass. 



Same years ago a correspondent of the 
''Scientific American" reported to that 
journal a number of experiments he had 
made to remove ice or congelation of 
water from window-panes. He placed 
the efficacy of the remedies he employed 
in the following order: 

Remedies Tried and Tested 

(1) Flames of an alcohol lamp; (2) 
sulphuric acid; (3) aqua ammonia; (4) 
glycerin; (5) nitric acid; (6) hydrochloric 
acid; (7) benzine; (8) hydriodic acid; (9) 
boric acid; (10) alcohol (11) cobalt ni- 
trate (12) infusion of nutgalls (13) tinc- 
ture or solution of ferrous sulphate. 

Some years ago H. F. Ruhl, of Man- 
heim, P., read a paper before a State 
association in which he declared that the 
only really effective way to avoid window 
frost was to have the window properly 
constructed in the first place, and to use 
suitable methods of heating and lighting 
in the second. He had remodelled his 
window in accordance with his particular 



ideas. To quote a portion of Mr. Ruhl's 
paper: 

"It is a well-known fact that where 
illumination is produced by kerosene, 
gas, or gasoline, the condensation of 
moisture on the glass is worse at night. 
This shows that illumination has some- 
thing to do with the frost on the window. 
Heat supplied from a stove, a hot-air 
furnace, or a steam boiler also causes 
more or less condensation of moisture. 

"In the writer's store the window is 
left open at the back, except that a mir- 
ror back is used; this is 30 inches high, is 
hung on a Pullman car spring sash bal- 
ance, thus permitting it to be raised or 
lowered at will. At night, when the tem- 
perature ranges somewhat lower, Jhe- 
mirror back is raised, thus admitting 
warmed air to the bottles of the window 
and entirely preventing frost during the 
night. The store is heated with a hot- 
water heater. With this heat the radiat- 
ing surfaces do not become so .hot as 
with stove or steam heat and there is no 

(Continued on page 184) 



An Effective Plan For Preventing Frosting of Windows 



An 
cxcep 



absolute I 
o/ 



/ton 



el/ 
fhe 



air- tilt window with the 
ventilation wmdoW will^ive 



absolutely perfect selection, and will even preven 



Our method is <3 small window nhich 
tve open to let in cold aifj prevent in f( 
moisture and free^inA 









1 ' 


f 

I 1 ' 


ii 


' //'/y ///A 


\*z, 


/ // | 














dir-tile, with the etceolion of the window above, 
we hod no trouble whatever. One other feature i % /hoi m the 

Hot bummer the Utile window affords perfect circulation and 
our windows are never so hot 

.1 great many plans have been tried out by merchants to prevent the frosting of the windows in the cold weather. A great 
many so-called solutions of the trouble have given relief when put into practice. Herewith is outlined a plan as adopted by 
the Stanley Mills Co., Hamilton, Ontario, which has proved very effective in overcoming this difficulty. The lettering fully 
describes the plan. Dealing further with this subject, May Bros., West Toronto, advise that an air-tight, dust-proof window 
will not freeze. The temperature in the windows of this store is about the same as outside. If, by accident, the door to the 
window is left open the windows become frosted. 



J),-*; Good* Fi< vh 



173 



Floor Coverings in Window Displays 

Humble, Domestic Linoleum May Be Arranged by the Clever Display Man to Bring New- 
Business to the Housefurnishing Department — Merchants Should Plan in January 
To (jive Fair Advantages to All Departments. 



IMMEDIATE results invariably fol- 
low the well-planned, well-dressed 
window. This is true especially in 
the town or city where many hundreds 
of thousands of people — prospective cus- 
tomers — pass daily. Every well-man- 
aged store will appreciate this point, 
and will, if a fair policy be observed, 
permit each department manager to take 
his full share of the benefits. No oi.e 
department should be allowed to mon- 
opolize the window space. True, certain 
departments carrying lines which show 
greater variety and therefore demand 
more frequent changes in both depart- 
ment and window display, will make a 
■claim for more frequent representation on 
the list for store display, but the other 
departments carrying staple lines should 
never be sacrificed as a result. They 
should have timely, regular and frequent 
periods for display allotted to them, and 
the manager should be consulted on the 
time and space he will require for his 
■display to render it most efective. 

Bolster Up Slack Departments 

Even in the larger stores this error 
•of over-doing certain departments is too 
widely practised. 

"How is it you show so few windows 
In draperies and curtains," one merchant 
■was asked, recently. 

"Oh, our housefurnishing department 
"hasn't been doing very well lately, and 
we are playing our lines that are sell- 
ing," was the reply. 

This is all right to a certain point, 
but after that it is all wrong. Lines 
that are selling well should undoubtedly 
l>e kept prominently before store cus- 
tomers, for the very fact that they are 
selling, proves their value. But a de- 
partment that through some reason or 
other is falling behind a little, should 
not be deserted and allowed to die a 
slow, painful death. This is bad busi- 
ness, and reflects adversely on the other 
departments. Instead, additional effort 
should be exercised, new appeals tried 
out, attractive stocks completed and ar- 
resting window displays frequently used. 

Feature Floor Coverings 

All branches of the housefurnishing 
department can supply the nucleus for 
an effective window, and the humble but 
attractive sanitary fl oor covering, for 
example, lends itself to display most 
admirably and economically. If business 
in your housefurnishing department is 
slack, try the window display that will 
attract the capable housewife — the 
woman who wants her home to look its 



best always and who wants quality and 
beauty in everything she pays for. 

Dry Goods Review has secured the 
following practical suggestions for a 
floor covering display from a window 
trimmer who has specialized in the treat- 
ment of displays in housefurnishing 
lines. 

"They can be very difficult, and they 
can be very effective, so I tackled them 
early in the game," said this display 
manager. "In the window display of 
sanitary floor coverings — that is, oil 
cloths or linoleums — few fixtures are 
required. It is essentially an economical 
display of an economical material. 

Fixtures for the Display 

"Having planned for several rolls, or 
portions of rolls of as many patterns 
as one desires to show, and a few lin- 
oleum or floor oilcloth rugs, it will be 
advisable to pick out the few necessary 
fixtures. Upon the selection and use of 
these the success of the display depends, 
for unless a few finishing touches are 
made, here and there, the showing will 
fail of its object. 

"Perhaps the most easily obtained ma- 
terial will be handles of discarded 
brooms. Saw them off full length, hav- 
ing first prepared square pieces of wood, 
say, 8 inches by 8 inches. Through the 
centre of these drive a two-inch wire 
nail, connecting the handle and wood 
square. Now taper the other end of 
the handle off at an angle of 45 degrees 
and to this attach a piece of wood, sim- 
ilar to that used for the base, or make 
a round piece of 9 or 10-inch diameter. 
When finished, and the other similarly, 
up to any desired number and length, 
you will be able to place these a little 
later. 

The All-Important Background 

"The ever-important background will 
now be made of a selected linoleum or 
oilcloth rug. This may be attached to 
the back of the window with small brads 
of about 18 gauge so as not to injure 
the rug. Once in place, and with one 
at the end of window — a narrower one 
according to the window's width, you 
have an important part of your job com- 
pleted. It also will have been well to 
have placed a rug on the floor, first. 

"The rolls, or part rolls of linoleum 
and oilcloth may now be placed. Those 
that are widest will be placed well to- 
ward the back of the window, on end. 
Those narrower may be placed in such 
a manner as to show each to the best ad- 
vantage, and the "stepping" arrange- 
ment will, when completed, lend an at- 



tractive effect. Across the top of some 
rolls it will be in order to place hori- 
zontally rolls of stair-stepping or pas- 
sage cloth. 

Finishing Touches 

"Now comes the small fixtures. Plac- 
ing these at desired intervals, small 
samples may be pinned or tacked, over- 
lapping each other at right angles, and 
affording the interested pedestrians 
something different to look at, and a 
small sample of each pattern that is 
carried in stock. The object will have 
been, of course, to make as attractive a 
window display as possible, and there- 
fore a sales-provoking one. Each of the 
cards will look best if tacked to one of 
the small stands just described. 

"Before calling this window complete 
two or three-neatly-lettered cards will 
have been prepared: 

LINOLEUMS ARE DURABLE AND 

SANITARY 

WE SELL MANY PRETTY PATTERNS 

DEPARTMENT DISPLAY FIRST 

FLOOR 

might be lettered on cards, and on the 
others prices may be given and a few- 
facts outlined regarding the stocks avail- 
able, prices, etc. 

"To reap the fullest advantages of 
this display it will be well to arrange 
some special advertising copy for use in 
the local paper, making a little cam- 
paign. The effort will pay." 



An Electric Fan 
Going in Winter 
Draws Attention 

Nothing retards sales so much as 
a window glazed over by "Jack 
Frost." First board the inside of the 
windows, or have tight-fitting sash- 
es to prevent the warmer air of the 
store entering. Next bore a row of 
holes at the base of the window and 
a similar set at the top. This will 
permit a free flow of air to keep 
the temperature down. A simpler 
plan is to start an electric fan run- 
ning first thing in the morning and 
keep it running all day. This keeps 
the warm air on the move and 
lowers the temperature so that frost 
will not have a chance to collect. 
The sight of an electric fan working 
in winter also will help to attract 
attention to the windows, especially 
if it be made to blow upon a small 
flag. 



174 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



Dry Goods Review 





CUT DOWN EXPENSE 
INCREASE SALES 

A Lesson from a Village in Quebec 

Beauceville is a village with the usual population and local .manufacturing interests, yet it 
a merchant with a vision. 

His vision was a department store so complete that every inclination to purchase in larger- 
centers would lie eliminated, that his establishment would be not only his pride but the pride 
of the community and that the establishment would be the last word in efficiency and service. 

This man was Mr. P. P. Renault, and to accomplish bis aim be called in the assistance of 
the service- department of done- Bros. & Co., Ltd., with the result, as partially shown above, 
a village store completely equipped with The New Way System that has increased his sales, 
efficiency and service to the public and has cut down his expense and overhead. We can 
do the same for you. 

JONES BROS. & CO., LIMITED, 

Sole Canadian Manufacturers' of The New Way System 

29-31 ADELAIDE ST. WEST :- :: TORONTO, ONT. 




Dry Goods Review 



KQUIPM EN T AND DIS PL A V 



175 




Let him help you 




There is a better way to keep 
the store records you need 

In your province there are representatives of The 
National Cash Register Company of Canada, Limited. 
They are students of business systems. They have 
been trained to be of service to merchants — to help 
merchants solve their problems. 

Let one of our representatives show you how you 
can get the store records you need without working 
overtime on day books, pass books, ledgers, and 
memorandums. 

He will show you the easiest way to get the records 
you need every day to control your business. 



We make cash re^istefrs for every line of business 

NATIONAL 

CASH REGISTER CO. 

OF CANADA LIMITED 



176 



EQ l' I I'M E N T A N D D I SPL A Y 



Dry Good's Review 



r 




No. 2040 
Narrow Shoulder Dress 
Forms — Enamel, Wood 
i i Metal Base. 



UP-TO-THE-MINUTE STYLE 

Made in Canada in our own factory 



We make six styles 
of Enamel Dress 
Forms with droop- 
i n g o r narrow 
shoulders — these 
latter are the com- 
ine stvle. 



Our Folder sent 
upon request. 




No. 3000W 

Hat Stand, 

Louis XVI Rtvlo: 

ol, I Ivorj or Cold 

Finish. 



Before buying' see our 
ornamental wood stand. 
This new line is now 
almost complete for 
displaying- all kinds of 
high-class goods. 

Finished in beautiful 
Old Ivory, Gold, Ma- 
hogany and Walnut fin- 
ish. This will interest 
the wide-awake dealer. 

Our next month adver- 
tisement will be on high 
class wax figures. The 
ready - to - wear mer- 
chants are specially in- 
vited to visit our 
sample room. 

Beside our own made 
models we are in pos- 
session of samples of 
Parisian Wax Manne- 
quins of Pierre Imans, 
Paris, of which we are 
the exclusive Canadian 
representatives. 



DELFOSSE & COMPANY 

247-249 Craig St. W., Montreal 




No. 3001 W 
Sew Waist Form in Louis XVI 
style. Old Ivory or Gold Finish 



Store Windows 



artistic, modern and business producing 
— that's what our special glass used in 
conjunction with Zouri Metal Store 
Fronts will give you. Let us prove it. 

Send for our latest catalogue. 




CONSOLIDATED 
PLATE GLASS CO 

OF CANADA LIMITED 

WINNIPEG TORONTO MONTREAL 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



Dale Wax Figure Co., Limited 

86 York Street, Toronto 

Canada 9 s Leading Display Fixture House 



Wax 
Figures 



Faultlessly 

true to life iti 

correct 

proportions. 

Pleasant, 

natural 

expressions. 

Graceful 
positions. 

Prevailing- 
smart styles. 

Art and utility 

in displays are 

ideally met in 

DALE Wax 

Figures. 

Send for 
Catalogue. 




No. 4035 

Waist 
Stand 




A Beautiful Reclining Wax Figure 




Art 
Fixtures 

Fixtures that do 
more than dis- 
play vour goods 
- DALE Fix- 
tures enhance 
their attractive- 
n e s s through 
the artistic 
touch they lend 
to the display. 

Dale Fixtures 
are all that de- 
signs of Art and 
skilful work- 
manship can 
make them. 

There is a DALE 
Fixture for 
every line of 
merchandise. 

Send for 
Catalogue. 



^ 




No. 3001 

Hat 
Stand 



MONTREAL 
P. R. Munro 

259 Bleury St. 



WINNIPEG 
O'Brien, Allen & Company 



Phoenix Block 



VANCOUVER 
E. R. Bollart & Son 

501 Mercantile Bldg. 



17S 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



Dry Goods Review 



Walker Medium-priced Fixtures 




Sections for Dry Goods, Gloves, Hose, Skirts, etc. 

Show Cases, Counters, Tables, Shelving and 
Wall Cases to Order for All Purposes 

Send Floor Plan with measurements and your ideas — ■ 
we will work out plan and quote you 

THE WALKER BIN & STORE FIXTURE CO., LTD. 

KITCHENER, ONTARIO 



Gipe - Hazard 
Store Service 

Co., Ltd. 

113 Sumach Street 
Toronto - Ont. 




Every Merchant is concerned in a greater or less degree as to 
the best method of recording Sales and conveying money be- 
tween Salesmen and the place where it is to be deposited. We 
have a circular which explains some of the advantages of our 
Carrier System. Would you care to profit by reading ? If so, 
a Post Card to us will bring it to you. 








May we write you and send photo* ? 

CREELMAN BROS. 

Manufacturers ESTABLISHED 1872 

Box 1737 A, 






Rib-Tops, Leggers, Sleevers, Sweater, Toque, Mitt and Special Machines. 


GEORGETOWN, ONT., CANADA 



"The Weil-Dressed Man" 

Points on how Haberdashers and Men's Wear merchants have attracted the man 
who buys "The Best." — A salesman travelled seven thousand miles and interviewed 
many hundreds of merchants before he obtained the information and ideas he has 
put into this article in February MEN'S WEAR REVIEW. The methods are. prac- 
tical, usable, and will prove intensely interesting to every wide-awake Men's Wear 
merchant. ^re you f acec j w ith a local advertising 

'm7vs~ w^ar rIviIw; ~. ~. .". ." .". .' 92" "I P roblem ? ' Eric W^ Gibbard, advertising 

143 university Ave., Toronto. i manager of the R. H. & J. Dowler btores 

rm interested in men's wear review, send me a sample j s p-ivinp; another talk on the subject in the 

r«-oruary issue if possible. If I decide not to take it I will ' Y ° . TT . . . . ■, 

write you within 6 days otherwise you will bill me for *2, February 1SSUC HlS experience IS Wlfle 

the subscription price for one year. I and thorQugh> He haS Written H REAL 

Namfc ' article for you. 

Addre=« | 



Dry Goods Revieu 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



179 



For the Year 1921 



We have planned to make this year the 
most memorable one in our history for our 
trade. For instance: 

Our latest wax models: will include a dis- 
tinctively new flapper line, which fills a very 
definite and long-felt need. Many new and 
beautiful wax models are being produced in 
our studios by our sculptor, Mr. Irwin G. 
Culver. 

Our display forms: are not only true to style 
and superior in material and construction, but 
embody many essential features, which are 
solely of Palmenberg origin. 

Our metal fixtures, manufactured by the 
most improved modern methods, are as stand- 
ardized in the excellence of their quality as in 
their size and style. 

Our New York Salesroom: 63-65 W. 36th St., 
is centrally located for the visiting trade. 
When in the New York Market, our salesmen 
will be glad to show you at any time the new 
features being constantly brought out, and 
assist in every way to solve your store equip- 
ment problem for the New Year. 



J. R. Palmenberg's Sons, Inc. 

63-65 West 36th St., New York 



Could you retire m 20 years? 

Perhaps you don't want to — but all the same it is 
a very pleasant feeling to have enough gilt-edged 
securities tucked away that if business does get 
troublesome you haven't the slightest worry. 

The big point is this — profit is not profit until it 
is safely invested and bearing interest. There is so 
much of the average merchant's earnings that are 
frittered away in non-essentials, when he might 
create an estate separate from his business load. 

THE FINANCIAL POST points the way to safe, 
sane investment in sound securities. Through the 
Investors' Enquiry Service you get the bed-rock 
facts behind any and all investments. Before you 
buy — write. 

The $5.00 invested in THE FINANCIAL POST 
service for a year will mean hundreds of dollars to 
you, if you follow the hints, tips and suggestions in 
the investment of your profits. When so many mer- 
chants have found its pages valuable to them, will 
you not fill in the coupon and find out for yourself 
just how valuable THE FINANCIAL POST can be 
to you? 



THE FINANCIAL POST, 
143 University Ave., 
Toronto, Ont. 



.1921 



On the understanding that THE FINANCIAL POST holds 
just the facts I need for safe investment, you may send 
me a recent issue. If I decide not to take it, I will write 
you within five days — otherwise you may bill me for $5, 
subscription price for one year. 

Name 



Victor H. Canham Co. 

Guelph, Ont. 

for HANGERS for every use 

For Retail For Stock Use -For Advertising 



Your Name and Address printed on each 

Hanger, if desired, in lots of 100 and over, 

FREE OF CHARGE. 




Canham 
Felt -Padded Hanger 

FOR SKIRTS OR TROUSERS 
6 inches wide 

Price — $8.00 per hundred 

Canham 

Star Skirt or Trouser No. i 

Hanger No. 7. Same as No. 1, only orange color 
and 7 inches wide. 

Price — $8.50 per hundred 



Canham Wood 





No - 9 Combination Hanger 

(In two sizes, 17^j inches and 15 inches) ] 
Price — $11.50 per hundred 

Canham 

Felt Grip 

Combination 

Hanger 

Price— $15.00 per hundred No. 11 



Canham 

Wishbone 

Hanger 

Price 

$15.00 

per 

hundred 




No. 13 



Guelph Factory in Operation 17 Years. 
Buffalo Factory in Operation 12 Years. 



180 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Review 



"THE JAMIESON LINE OF CANADA" 




^7 CAAtr (MMVff&Si 

/ ALEXJAMCO. TORONTO 

. ■ . - 



ADELAIDE 681 







SlfXaNDERjaMIESON&l 




55 Ba y Street 



Tc 



OJf^OJWTO. 




Introducing to the Wholesale 
and Retail Trade of Canada 

The New Drapery and House- 
Furnishing Firm of Toronto 

* 

Formerly the Parent Company, of which the above firm is an offspring, was repre- 
sented by an Agent who solicited and received many large Import Orders from 
the leading Wholesale and Retail Merchants of Eastern Canada. 

To meet the demand for Scottish-made Cream and Colored Madras, Curtain Nets, 
Lace Curtains, Vitrage and Brise-bise, it has been considered advisable to establish 
a Canadian company under the style of ALEXANDER JAMIESON & CO. at 
Toronto, where Wholesale and Retail Merchants can purchase their requirements 
either in Sterling or Canadian Currency from a large and well-assorted stock. We 
will be in the favorable position of being able to supply your needs at all times, 
and cordially invite your esteemed patronage and support to our new enterprise. 

Representatives will call on the Trade early in February, but we earnestly advise 
you to make your selections as soon as possible as we consider our stocks will not 
meet the demand we expect for these World-Renowned Goods. 

We anticipate large business and are hoping that the provisions we are making 
will enable us to render you good service and prompt deliveries. 

Yours faithfully, 

ALEXANDER JAMIESON & COMPANY 

Archibald McCaig, 

General Manager for Canada 
January 15th, 192 1. 



Dni Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



LSI 




Improve Your Opportunity 

This year it is important that you anticipate an early and heavy demand for lino- 
leums, oil cloth and feltol. Our Dominion-wide advertising now appearing in 
leading newspapers, magazines and agricultural papers is successfully inducing 
the user — the Canadian Housewife — to buy. 

Do not disappoint the many prospective buyers who may be marking YOUR store 
as the best place to buy. When these interested prospects call, have an array of 
designs of Linoleum, Floor Oilcloth and Feltol that will mean a sale every time. It 
is the dealer with the stock — the varied range of patterns — who will reap the 
business and therefore the profits. 

Have you that completeness of variety in Linoleum and Floor Oilcloth Rugs that 
will pile up sales for you? These attractive, sanitary, long-wearing floor coverings 
are meeting with increasing popularity everywhere — all over Canada. Many 
dealers are getting the business. What share of it comes your way? 



PLAN EARLY— 

RE-ARRANGE YOUR WINDOWS- 
DRESS UP YOUR DEPARTMENT- 
THINK BIGGER AND BETTER BUSINESS. 



AND 
SELL OUR MADE-IN-CANADA FLOOR COV- 
ERINGS-MADE BY CANADIAN WORKMEN 
TO WITHSTAND CANADIAN CLIMATE 



Linoleum Floor Oilcloth Feltol 
Linoleum and Floor Oilcloth Rugs 

Sold Through Wholesale Jobbing Trade 

DOMINION OILCLOTH & LINOLEUM CO. 

LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



CANADA 



182 



Dry Goods Review 



What Canadian Drapery Houses Offer 

Merchants Carrying Housefurnishing Lines Will Need to Choose Stocks Carefully This 

Spring — Manufacturers Have Provided Tasteful and Varied Range of Drapery 

Fabrics, Curtains and Cushions — "Put Your Dollars to Work," Says One 

Draper\ Expert, Who Says There is Money in This Department. 




Cretonnes That Will Be Seen 



A group of handsome drapery fabrics, including a floral, a bird and a Japanese scenic design in superb colorings ideal 
for many interior uses, and which have the added feature of being able to withstand continued exposure to the light. — 
Shown by courtesy of Geo. H. Hees, Son & Company. 



DURING this coming Spring it will 
be difficult for the drapery de- 
partment to make a good turn- 
over as the general tendency is to limit 
the buying, and naturally this will not 
be an "importing" year. It is necessary 
for the drapery buyer who wishes to 
overcome this difficulty to pay particular 
attention to the stocks carried by the 
Canadian drapery houses and to become 
acquainted with the different patterns so 
that they will be in a position to replen- 
ish their stocks as fast as sales are 
made. 

A fine display of goods for customers 
to select from is the biggest single fac- 
tor in interesting the consumer. Women 
care nothing about how much stock there 
is in reserve in the stock-room; it is the 
assortment of well chosen and varied 
fabrics they see which attracts tiade and 
makes sales. 

Dry Goods Review interviewed one of 
the leading drapery men in Toronto this 
month and his advice to those merchants 
desirous of boosting sales in the house- 
furnishing department was set forth as 
follows: 

A dollar is a piece worker — it only 
earns while it works. Turn the dollar 
into merchandise, put the merchandise 
on your counter, sell it and turn it back 
into a dollar again — a dollar, plus a 
little for freight, overhead, selling costs 



and profit. Then turn the dollar back 
into merchandise — put it back to work 
again. 

But how about the merchandise— the 
dollar — in the stock room? They're "lazy 
dollars." They're not working, not even 
making savings bank interest. Put the 
stockroom loafer to work. Make Canadian 
drapery houses furnish the lazy dollar by 
making them carry your stock, by using 
their reserve stock as your wareroom 
supply. Buy the goods you need for a 
big display assortment but none for re- 
serve 

Splendid Range of Curtains 

The goods available for Spring from 
Canadian manufacturers and wholesal- 
ers provide a wide and interesting range 
of splendid lines which will prove the 
sales getters in the live drapery depart- 
ment 

Included in the new assortments being 
especially featured are curtains made up 
from scrim materials with colored bor- 
ders These are a great convenience, be- 
ing the ready-for-sale sort, made up two 
and a half yards long They have been 
very successfully done in English Bunty 
cloths, in cream and putty shades, with 
brightly colored borders. 

Irish Point Curtains 

For the first time for some years there 
is a range of very beautiful Irish point 



Swiss curtains on the market. The de- 
signs are entirely new and are worthy of 
being placed in the most beautiful of 
homes. 

Panel nets, according to the best 
sources of information, which were 
slightly sampled last year and proved 
such a huge success, are going to be a 
big thing this season. To the Nottingham 
and filets are now added a splendid range 
of Irish point Swiss. 

Nets of fine design and all over pat- 
terns are now being offered in a wide 
assortment and will prove very popular. 

Novelty curtains made from scrim, 
voile, and marquisette have become a 
very staple line and are firmly estab- 
lished with the consumers. 

English Cretonnes 

This Spring will introduce again a 
wonderful variety of English cretonnes. 
For the past few years the market has 
been flooded with bright pattern designs 
of very light material which will look 
attractive when purchased but soon show 
the lack of quality. English designs 
printed on real cretonne cloths will be 
largely featured. Some of the designs 
shown are entirely new and the color 
effects very harmonious. Most attractive 
looms can be made by using these cre- 
tonnes for curtains and over hangings on 
the windows and for slip-covers or up 



Dry Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



188 



holstery of furniture. In verdure pat- 
terns the colors range in brown, wood, 
an(i green shades give a good assortment 
for the draping of the living room and 
library, while for heavier work in dining 
room and doorways the wonderful Eng- 
lish shadow-cloths are most appropriate. 
These cloths are not printed but are 
actually woven. The great advantage is 
that they are the same on both sides, 
there is no reverse, and when used on the 
windows or as lamp shades, where the 
light shows through, they retain, their 
full color value. The shadow cloths are 
in 30-inch and 50-inch widths. 

Plain casement cloths are being shown 
in a great variety of qualities and colors 
and will have a big sale at this time of 
the year for the decoration of the sun 
room. Most of these fabrics are guar- 
anteed sunfast, which is a very desirable 
feature. 

Velours and Tapestries 

There is no heavy drapery* fabric to 
take the place of plain velours. This 
material, because of its rich pile, imparts 
a soft luxurious effect to the room in 
which it is used and for that reason will 
always be an important factor in the 
drapery department. 

Sunfast silk poplins are again on the 
market and are proving very successful. 

A very welcome addition to the up- 
holstery fabrics, which has been missing 
for some years, is the French verdure 
tapestry. Many original and beautiful 
designs are now available. The French 
mills have not lost their art in producing 
the soft color combinations for which 
they were so famous. The range is so 
large that there should be no difficulty in 
choosing the styles and colors that will 
please your customers. 

The Vogue of the Cushion 

Nowadays when the negligee and all 
manner of lounge attire is so much ex- 
ploited there is a host of possibilities for 
the clever drapery buyer. The "lounge" 
cushion is only a beginning and, accord- 
ing to the beautiful illustrations of the 
fashion journals, the lounge cushion has 
become a regular part of milady's bou- 
doir in the scheme of decoration and 
utility. Some of these cushions are ex- 
ceedingly elaborate, not only of cre- 
tonnes, but plain, printed and brocaded 
silks and satins shirred and finished with 
tassels. Some are decorated with silken 
ribbon flowers and buds and some lace 
trimmed. In rooms where the back- 
ground is neutral, cushions are particu- 
larly good. 

It is a wonder sometimes where the 
demand can possibly come from to justify 
the manufacture of some of the bizarre 
patterns that are now on the market, but 
it comes from unconsidered sources — 
lamp shades, box covers, back rests, 
shopping baes, table scarfs and particu- 
larly cushions not of the old type, but of 
the new vogue — cushions for the feet, 
and cushions of all conceivable shapes 
for the back. This applies especially to 



cretonnes. There is a wonderful range 
of cushions now available for the retailer 
and they certainly help to decorate the 
drapery department and show window. 

Brasses in Wide Ranges 

Just a word about drapery brass 
goods. There are a great number of 
lines now being manufactured by con- 
cerns in Canada, and it will not be nec- 
essary from now on to place big orders 
with firms outside. Flat extension rods 
are made in great variety of sizes and 
patterns from which it is possible to 
select all that is needed. Brass tubing is 
now being made by domestic manufac- 
turers for the first time, and is sold at 
prices much lower than the imported 
goods. 



Costume 

Accessories 



R. C. McLean, head of McLean's de- 
partmental store, Prince Albert, has re- 
turned from Eastern Canada and the 
United States. Mi\ McLean spent sev- 
eral weeks making extensive purchases, 
the benefits of which will be given the 
patrons of the store in advantageous 
merchandising. 



French women are as enthusiastic 
over the vogue of bracelets and bangles 
as they were last season, and just as 
fastidious in their choice of these pretty 
vanities, according to a recently re- 
turned buyer who has brought back 
many remarkably pretty examples of 
European art in novelty jewellery. 

The women in Paris wear many brace- 
lets, and it is the opinion that the bangle 
bracelet has come to stay. These are 
worn in great quantities and it is often 
noticed that two of these are worn to- 
gether, one in ivory and the other in 
tortoise shell. 

There is another novelty which is quite 
interesting and is on the order of the 
little silver bead chain that was an inno- 
vation last season. This is a chain per- 
haps 90 inches long, made of tiny pearl 
beads placed close together on a small 
(Continued on page 198) 




Handsome Shadow Cloths 

Two rich materials which reveal handsome floral designs on light grounds 
included in the Spring lines of the Geo. H. Hees, Son & Company. The bolster 
cushion is in black satin with dull gold embroidery centre section and gold tassels. 



1M 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Rt view 



Reed Furniture 
Popular Again 
At Lower Prices 

Reed furniture has not lost any of its 
appeal — it is being more generally 
adopted each season and from being 
purely a sun room or verandah furnish- 
ing has gradually become recognized as 
a splendid and practical line for general 
household use — living room, dining room 
and bed room, as well as sun room, now 
the most serviceable and attractive 
suites and for those who desire suites in 
reed or reed and enamel the merchant 
will be able to quote prices between 15 
and 30 per cent, lower than last summer. 

Dry Goods Review recently talked with 
the head of one of the foremost houses in 
Canada engaged in the manufacture of 
this furniture, who stated that while 
October had been a dead month in so 
many lines, their firm had done the big- 
gest business of the year during that 
period. 

"Things are quiet however just now in 
our business," said • this manufacturer. 
"But we are looking for an improvement 
and we feel that the attractive and gen- 
erous reductions which we have had to 
make in all our lines will help us to pick 
up more rapidly." 

Reed furniture is being manufactured 
to give practical service, it is strong, 
well-built, and graceful. It is adaptable 
to all types of interiors in the moderate 
home, and when daintily upholstered in 
one of the numerous effective new cre- 
tonnes, it makes an idea*l complement to 
any room that does not aspire to the 
pretentious or formal in treatment and 
furnishing. 

Among the new lines for Spring are 
suites in the rattan shade, a soft green- 
ish grey which is most useful and har- 
monizes with any upholstery that might 
be chosen. Enamel and reed combina- 
tions are still very fashionable, but the 
merchant will do well to stock in the 
popular lines in natural, brown and rat- 
tan, so that well-built lines in an ex- 
cellent range will be available at prices 
that will appeal to the consumer who is 
expecting and demanding more reason- 
ably priced commodities. 



KEEP THE WINDOW CLEAR OF 
FROST 

(Continued from page 172) 
doubt that hot-water heat is a strong 
factor in preventing frost on the window. 
The store is lighted with electricity, and 
this, because of the absence of an open 
flame, is without doubt another factor 
in preventing frost. 

' 'The proof of the pudding is in the 
eating,* and here's the proof of the stora 
with the frost-proof windows: The writ- 
er's windows were entirely free from 
frost during the past winter, while the 
windows of the other stores in town 
were covered with frost for months at a 
time." 



















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A Very Neat Design 

This narrow panel is among the new de- 
signs being shown by Geo. H. Hees, Son & 
Company, Toronto, and features a repeti- 
tion of four identical patterns. 



Results of Research 

Quite a formidable list of glycerin and 
soap mixtures are employed for the pur- 
pose of preventing the condensation of 
moisture on the screens and windows of 
motor cars. During the war one of the 
Research Committees of the United 
States investigated the subject anew 
with the object of finding out the best 
"anti-dimming" preparation for gas- 
respirator eye-pieces. The official for- 
mula is as follows: 
Sulphonated castor oil (85%) 100 parts 

Sodium hydroxide 15 parts 

Water-glass syrup 5 parts 

Paraffin oil (heavy) 5 parts 

The following two formulae are im- 
provements on the above: 

(1) Sodium salt of 65% sul- 
phonated rape oil containing 

35% water 100 parts 

Sodium hydroxide 20 parts 

Water-glass syrup 5 parts 

Glycerin 3 parts 

"Marine" oil 3 parts 

Dried to form a solid stick when com- 
pressed. 

(2) Potassium salt of 62% sul- 
phonated cotton oil contain- 
ing 38 per cent, water 100 parts 

Sodium hydroxide 15 parts 

Water-glass syrup 3 parts 



Prominent British Firm 

Opens Toronto Offices 

Alexander Jamieson and Co.. Ltd., Ap- 
points Archibald McCaig Canadian 
Representative. — Offices 
Opened Jan. 3rd, at 55 
Bay Street 

Archibald McCaig, formerly with the 
firm of Geo. H. Hees, Son & Co., Ltd., 
Toronto, has resigned his position of 
overseas buyer for that firm and has 
opened offices at 55 Bay street, where he 
will be Canadian general manager and 
representative of the well known British 
firm of Alexander Jamieson and Com- 
pany. 

The lines carried will be known as the 
Jamieson Lines of Canada, and will in- 
clude large stocks of Scotch made lace 
curtains, Scotch madras and curtain nets 
which will be held at Toronto for the con- 
venience .and accommodation of the re- 
tail merchants throughout Canada. 

The firm of Alexander Jamieson and 
Co., Ltd., the parent house, from whom 
the Canadian concern will draw its 
stocks, is widely known to the trade 
all over the world, having branches es- 
tablished at London, Glasgow, Melbourne, 
Sydney, Capetown, Durban, New York, 
Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels, Zurich, Con- 
stantinople and now at Toronto. 

"It pays to-day to purchase in Great 
Britain," said Mr. McCaig, when seen 
in the new offices this month. "The Can- 
adian dollar is depreciated at about 18 
per cent, on the American market and 
besides there is a difference of 10 per 
cent. on customs duties. In addition 
Sterling can be purchased with Canadian 
currency at a discount of 20 per cent., 
making a total difference of 48 per cent, 
in favor of British merchandise." 

The new premises which were opened 
January 3, 1921, are spacious and hand- 
somely equipped with the most modern 
display devices and show cases. Light 
oak wood work and furnishings are used 
throughout. 



Glycerin .3 parts 

"Marine" oil 3 parts 

Dried to form a solid stick when com- 
pressed. 

The "marine oil" referred to is heavy 
paraffin oil. The surface of the glass is 
first polished until clean and dry, then 
a little of the composition applied, 
rubbed in with the hand, and polished off 
with a soft rag until the surface is 
clear. 



BRITISH DYESTUFFS ACT COMES 
INTO FORCE 

London. — The British Dyestuffs Act 
prohibiting the importation of dyestuffs 
came into force January 15. In future 
all importations- of dyestuffs will be sub- 
ject to license, with preference to pro- 
ducts from the British dominions. 



, 



Dry Co,,, is Review 



Fine New House Furnishing Department 

Hamilton Co., of Montreal, Issue Smart Little Folder Announcing Fnlargment ana Im- 
provement of Carpet and Curtain Department - "Low Prices Greatest Selling 
Factor," Says Manager. "More effective Than Fquipment or Novel 

Store Features." 



183 



IN order to more conveniently ac- 
quaint their many customers with 
the fact that the house-furnishings 
department had been moved down one 
floor and considerably enlarged and im- 
proved, the Hamilton Co., of Montreal, 
i vi ently issued a particularly attractive 
folder which was mailed to a very large 
number of their friends. 

The folder was designed so that it could 
be opened out into a perfect square 
about twelve inches each way and was 
divided off into some 22 spaces, each of 
which contained news regarding a cer- 
tain feature of the department. In the 
centre was a splendid reproduction of the 
department itself, demonstrating more 
graphically than any amount of written 
description could do the fine equip- 
ment and wide selection afforded by the 
section in question. The change in ^ie 
location of the department was made 
during the summer months, so that when 
country houses were closed and city 
ones opened the Hamilton store was all 
ready with its Fall showing of floor cov- 
erings, curtains, draperies, etc. 

Through the courtesy of Mr. Brown, 
manager of the department, Dry Goods 
Review was enabled to reproduce some 
of the features of the advertising cir- 
cular in question, and to obtain partic- 
ulars regarding the equipment of the 
new third floor, which covers an area of 
approximately 7,000 square feet. 

The walls have been kalsomined white 
like the ceiling, and the floor is entirely 
of polished hardwood, which shows off the 
beauties of the large collection of rugs 
to perfection. The lighting is provided 
in two ways, by large windows at the 
front and back, and by a novel method 
of artificial lighting, which provides a 
soft, mellow illumination by means of a 
new form of indirect lamp fixture, paint- 
ed deep cream. 

The curtain department is situated at 
one end of the floor and features artistic 
displays of fine marquisettes, scrims, cre- 
tonnes, Scotch nets, Nottingham cur- 
tains and portieres, etc. Along the sides 
are shown the many varieties of oil- 
cloths and linoleums and an important 
service rendered in this section is the 
correct measurement of all floor cover- 
ings which is always insisted upon, so 
that waste is minimized and accurate 
quantities determined promptly. 

Splendid Stock Carried 

All along the floor are piled many 
varieties of handsome rugs, including 
Tekee Wiltons, Brussels, tapestry and 




Two New Panels 

"Stripe" effects are very new in the.fine lace panels being shown and for higher 
class window treatment have to a large extent replaced the allover effects in which 
large inset motifs were featured. 



Balmoral squares and the newest Japan- 
ese grass rugs, all in at least half a 
dozen sizes. Here too, are found the 
numerous sundries which properly belong 
to a house-furnishing department, such 
as door mats, hearthrugs, stair pads, 
carpet sweepers, poles, etc., as well as a 
popular remnant section, which no house- 
furnishing department should ever be 
without. 

Chairs are provided at intervals down 
the department for the convenience of 
customers wishing to examine many var- 
ieties without the usual strain of stoop- 
ing constantly, and are a much appre- 
ciated feature. 

An Effective Suggestion 

According to the manager, the public 
is entirely satisfied with the convenient 
appointments afforded by the change and 
the growth of the department has been 
due largely to the keen understanding 
of the various problems encountered in 
the business by the staff in charge. Most 
women like to have their homes a little 
different from anything else in town, and 
consequently appreciate the suggestions 
offered by the Hamilton store, as for in- 
stance, the following little hint from the 
drapery section: 

"The custom of changing the 
draperies to bring them into har- 



mony with the new season is a 
growing one. If you've planned a 
change see the cheery designs now 
showing on the third floor of the 
Hamilton store." 

Mr. Brown is especially proud of his 
showing -of imported Scotch nets which 
he displays in snowy piles upon tables 
at one end of the floor, and which have 
proved to be an unusual source of inter- 
est to Montreal women. Emphasis is 
justly laid upon the fact that the store 
contracted for its curtains from 1 to 3 
years ago and is consequently selling at 
prices which are reniaricably low. Ac- 
cording to the manager this is the main 
reason for the store's success in this 
department, and argues that there is no 
equipment or store feature so produc- 
tive of results as the low price no mat- 
ter what inducements are put forth to 
the contrarv. 



ST. JOHN MERCHANT DIES 

James F. Robertson, president of the 
Manchester, Robertson, Allison, Limited, 
large dry goods house in St. John, N.B.. 
died Saturday, January 15, at his home, 
4 Carleton Street, after a brief illness. 
He had been confined to the house for 
the past ten days. He was in his 
eighty-second year. 



!>•; 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Review 



Credit Sound in Australia 

James Gardiner States that Embarrass- 
ment Was Only Temporary 

dit in Australia ami New Zealand, 
which has been causing Canadian ex- 
porters concern and loss of business 
lately, is in a sound condition, says 
James Gardiner, a member of Hodgson, 
Sumner & Co., Ltd., of Montreal, and 
formerly on the council of the Montreal 
Board of Trade. Mr. Gardiner has just 
returned from a pleasure trip to those 
Dominions, but took a keen interest in 
business conditions out there, and found 
that retail business was active, but 
wholesalers were rather stocked up, and 
retailers not buying much. Conditions, 
he said, are somewhat similar to those 
in Canada, but are more acute. 

A clear explanation of why Canadian 
exporters have difficulty in financing 
shipments to those Dominions was given 
by Mr. Gardiner, the primary reason 
being that shipments, particularly from 
Great Britain, had been excessively 
heavy, and exhausted the resources of 
the Australian banks, and there was no 
corresponding increase in their exports. 

This occurred very soon after the 
British Government, which had been pay- 
ing spot cash for Australian wool, as 
shipped or warehoused in Australia, 
ceased to buy wool. It meant, said Mr. 
Gardiner, that instead of the British 
Government bearing the p ur den of the 
lengthy financing of the wool crop, it 
fell, perhaps somewhat unexpectedly, on 
the Australian banks, which were no 
longer able to carry on financing heavy 
imports. 

Mr. Gardiner went carefully into this, 
however, and believes that it is only a 
temporary condition, and will right itself 
within the next two or three months at 
most. An important factor in its better- 
ment will be the sale of the wool crop. 
Prices broke, and there was no buying, 
but banks will be in funds again as 
soon as the crop begins moving. 



Working People 

Have the Money 

Scotch Firm in Communication with 

Canadian Customer Comments on 

Conditions in Old Country 

A Toronto wholesaler recently re- 
ceived the following advice from a 
Scotch firm commenting on the buying 
problems of the day: 

"We wrote you fully on this subject 
last week, and do not wish to repeat 
ourselves further than to say that every 
day the position is becoming more crit- 
ical here, we do not know whom to give 
credit to. The quotation you give from 
one of your newspapers is rather inter- 
esting: 'The public have gone on a buy- 
ing strike and refuse to loosen up until 
prices reach what they consider a proper 



basis.' It would be useful if this news- 
paper could inform its public what a pro- 
per basis would be, always bearing in 
mind that labor all over the world de- 
mands three to four times what it did 
in pre-war days. 

"In this country we think the trouble 
is going to resolve itself into one single 
issue, namely, that whereas before the 
war the manufacturers and distributors 
possessed the capital necessary to con- 
duct their businesses, to-day that cap- 
ital has been transferred to the working 
classes. Up till now they have had the 
spending capacity, but the newspaper 
propaganda stopped the purchases. Now 
the people hold the money, and the 
manufacturers and merchants are sud- 
denly pulled up. 

"Meantime the Government have been 
taking a huge toll for taxation, and this 
has been taken from the merchants and 
manufacturers in the first place. We 
do not see any relief until another fiscal 
policy can be adopted. People who have 
been paying taxes until now no longer 
have the money to pay, and the Govern- 
ment have not got the organization to 
get the money from the people who now 
have it. Until this is adjusted we do 
not see any possible relief from our 
difficulties. It means a new type of 
financier, and a new party in politics." 



Furniture and 
Draperies Shown 

At Exhibition 

On Saturday, January 8, the Toronto 
Furniture Exhibition was opened in the 
John Kay building, some fifty Canadian 
manufacturing concerns being repre- 
sented. 

The exhibition, which is the beginning 
of a series of annual displays, was en- 
thusiastically supported by the furniture 
men and curtain manufacturers from the 
beginning and it is the hope of those who 
originated the idea and put the scheme 



into effect that the exhibition -will soon 
become . a permanent fixture, and ( some 
day rival such huge displays as those 
shown in the Bush Terminal, New York. 
Enterprises such as this, it is claimed, 
will greatly improve the relations be- 
tween the manufacturers and their cus- 
tomers, and will at the same time enable 
the Canadian public to appreciate to 
what extent the manufacture of furni- 
ture, carpets, floor coverings and draper- 
ies has grown in this country. 

The exhibitors were keenly attentive to 
enquiries at all times during the exhibi- 
tion, and did everything possible to ac- 
commodate their visitors, furnish details 
concerning their particular lines and as- 
sist in every possible way to make the 
first exhibition a success. Firms from 
Toronto, Montreal, Owen Sound, Kincar- 
dine, Hanover, Renfrew, Waterloo, Wind- 
sor, N.S., Napanee, Elora, Milverton, 
Southampton, Lucknow, Hespeler, Win- 
chester and Cornwall occupied space on 
the five floors, balconies and basement of 
the old Kay building which lent itself 
admirably for the numerous and varied 
displays. 

The furniture shown was representa- 
tive of the best products from the 
various companies manufacturing all 
classes of furniture in Ontario and Que- 
bec, and some very beautiful examples 
characterized each exhibit. 

Bedding, linen, draperies, blinds and 
curtains were also artistically displayed, 
while fixtures, picture frames, mirror 
frames, Florentine vases and book rests 
and even refrigerators were on view. The 
entire exhibition presented a most inter- 
esting review of articles being made in 
the Dominion for domestic consumption, 
and it is reported that considerable im- 
petus has been given to the trade dealing 
in these lines through the establishment 
of the exhibition and the excellent "get- 
together" spirit which it engendered. 

The manufacturers tendered a banquet 
to the retail trade at the King Edward 
Hotel on Friday, January 14. The an- 
nual meeting of the Retail Furniture 
Dealers' Association was also held at the 
hotel the same day. 



FLOOR COVERINGS HAVE 10% FURTHER REDUCTION 

Things are very quiet in the floor covering lines, including linoleum, oil 
cloths and carpets. A drop of 10% has followed a previous drop on Decem- 
ber 1st in floor oils but the dealers are now assured of no further reductions 
till after April 1st. By that time it is expected carpets will have experi- 
enced a further drop of from 10 to 20%. 

The following table includes the price list for December 1st, 1920, and 
the later revised list for January 1st, 1921, showing the further drop of 
about 10%. 

REVISED PRICE LIST 

DEC 1920 JAN. 1921 

Width No. 2 Quality 'No. 3 Quality No. 2 Quality ' No. 3 Quality 

90-in 70 65 64 58 

72 " 70 65 64 58 

54 " 71 66 65 59 

45 " 71 66 65 59 

36 " 71 66 65 59 



Dvi (loads Review 



187 



Baxter's Way With Floor Coverings 

Takes Charge of Run Down Department and Makes it Hum in Six Months -- Reorganizes 
Entire Policy and Builds Up Splendid Reputation For His Firm — Cranky Patrons 

Won Over and Record Sales Made. 



WANTED — A real salesman to take charge 
floor-covering department in large store. 
There is a man somewhere who may have 
an opportunity to make a name and salary 
for himself. If you're the .'man we'll make 
the opportunity. 



SUCH was the unusual advertise- 
ment that caught the eye of Harvey 
Baxter as he glanced over the 
Evening Times. He was not looking for 
work but the unique advertisement 
seemed to suggest an opportunity, and 
if there was one thing that he could not 
stand it was a "dare you" proposal. Here 
was one and he resolved to investigate. 

Making a Survey 

Harvey had always kept his eyes and 
ears open. In the 15 years' experience he 
had as a salesman he found it paid. Con- 
sequently, when looking over this large 
departmental store, ana the department 
that sought a new manager, he was quick 
to note the many improvements that 
could be made. As a matter of fact he 
was unable to see how a store so large, 
and apparently successful, could tolerate 
the disregard shown in the window now 
filled with floor-coverings. His surprise 
was similar regarding the department it- 
self. If it sold goods it was not, he 
concluded, the attractiveness of arrange- 
ment that accomplished it; that could 
not be. 

"What do you think of our proposi- 
tion?" asked the merchandise manager, 
as Harvey returned to the office. "Think 
you are the man?" 

"That depends on you as much as 
the man whom you choose to assume 
charge. If you really want to know 
what I think I'll tell you. 

"In the first place, if you are not get- 
ting the turnover you think you should 
have I am not surprised. I have handled 
several departments of this nature in 
the past fifteen years, but this is the 
most poorly-arranged, with as little ap- 
parent attention paid the selection of 
patterns, as I have seen. 

"You have put this proposition up to 
me, Mr. Bland, and I am ready to come 
on under the distinct understanding that 
you give me complete charge of the de- 
partment for six months. By complete 
charge I mean that I am going to direct 
the arrangement and purchase of stock, 
the selection of assistants and what goes 
into the advertising space we use on the 
lines carried in my department. At the 
end of six months I am willing to let 
you say whether I am to remain. But I 
would not undertake to swing success 
out of this mess in any shorter period 
of time." 



"A New Broom Sweeps Clean" 
Of course Harvey was appointed. His 
talk to the merchandise manager was 
perhaps the most frank he ever had 
"taken" from any applicant, and at first 
he was inclined to think Harvey imper- 
tinent. However, as Harvey proceeded, 
Bland could readily see that the man 
knew what he was talking about and he 
made prompt decision. 

For the next week things were turned 
upside down in the floor-covering de- 
partment of Bovay's Limited. Harvey 
had carefully planned, after hours, just 
what he could do, so that he lost no time 
in making the desired changes. 

Of course there were inquiring- 
glances from the heads of other depart- 
ments as the new manager went about 
his work. An occasional giggle was 
thrown in from a distant group of sales- 
men, and although this reached Har- 
vey's ears he was not perturbed in the 
least. Straight ahead he went and at the 
end of ten days he had wrought a won- 
derful change. Among other things he 
had, himself, dressed a most effective 
window of floor-coverings. With the sev- 
eral suitable cards that had been lettered 
and well-placed, it began to draw many 
people, and half a dozen had accepted 
the suggestion on one of the cards to 
"Take Elevator to Third Floor and View 
a Complete Range." Better still, four 
sales were recorded the first morning 
the display was in. 

Turning the Tide 

Of course the "new broom" continued 
to sweep clean. The cynical glances 
from other department heads stopped. 
Friendly voices called at the department 
to speak a word of commendation and 
appreciation concerning the department 
improvements. A little friendly rivalry 
was springing up with regard to both 
departmental and window displays. 

"Bovay's Limited," was fast becoming 
the shopping Mecca. The long battery 
of display windows have undergone a 
great change. Each is now changed twice 
a week and so attractive are the average 
displays that they form the subject of 
many a conversation. Nearly every de- 
partment has considerably increased its 
weekly turnover; some of them doubling 
and others trebling. Not only this, but 
the store "atmosphere" is entirely dif- 
ferent and the sales staff is happier than 
before. 

A Typical Sale 

Mrs. Henry James came in one morn- 
ing. One of the store's oldest customers, 
the clerks had learned to dread her ap- 
proach, for she was generally described 
as a crank. Passing toward the rear 



she took the elevator to the third floor, 
thence to the floor-covering crepartment. 
"Good morning, madam," came from 
the new manager. 

"You have some linoleum rugs in one 
of the display windows this morning. I 
do not want one to-day but would like 
to see your stock. Have you any new 
patterns this year?" began the much- 
disliked customer. 

"These rugs on this rack," came the 
prompt reply, "have been received from 
the factory recently. They are selected 
with a view to suiting almost every type 
of room and are supplied in several 
color combinations. The materials of 
which they are made are selected so as 
to give the purchaser a long-wearing 
rug. These will last for years, the basic 
wearing materials being cork, ground 
fine, and then mixed with linseed oil and 
other ingredients that science proves are' 
wear-resisting. These materials are 
subject to tremendous pressure between 
huge steel rolls, being actually 'built' 
over a base of selected burlap. And, 
very important to the mistress, these 
rugs look ever new, all the care required 
being that of passing a damp cloth over 
the surface once a clay. You wiTT see, 
madam, that this ensures cleanliness with 
a minimum of work. What rooms do you 
wish to cover, and do you know the 
s:zes?" 

"I trust you will pardon me, sir, but I 
have been trading with this firm for 
eighteen years. 1 hav2 bought exten- 
sively. But if the courtesy you have 
5-hown this morning in telling me what 
you have about the good points of these 
m.cr? had been exorcised years ago it 
would have secured a greater share of 
my patronage. I thins you may send 
me one of that design (pointing to a rug 
she admired) and will you please send a 
man to take measurements?" 

"We will have a man call this after- 
noon, and if you wish any other rooms 
measured, please advise him. Good 
morning, and thank you." 

During the first three months Har- 
vey's department had made a good show- 
ing. At the end of the fourth month the 
merchandise manager sent for him and 
said he was astonished at the progress 
which had been made. Furthermore, he 
was prepared to make a three years' 
agreement with the new manager at a 
salary double that agreed upon when he 
came. That is two years ago. Since 
then he has been made assistant mer- 
chandise manager and is receiving $400 
a month, with an immediate prospect of 
promotion to the position of merchandise 
manager. 






HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Review 



■H. 



SMSIal* 



on &~co7nnwiTFn ^ 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Monarch Linen Tint, Royal Standard, Colonial, 

Acme and Alberta Window Shades 

York Draperies, Sleepwell Comforters, Pillows, 

Davenport Brass Goods 







Keep Full Displays 

The biggest single selling factor is having full assortments of goods on 

your -helves, from which your customer can make a selection. 

1 1 i.- not necessary to carry a big stock in reserve but you must make 

a fine display to gel business. 

This is no time to import and have the surplus stock lying idle. Buy 

u'h.il you want, when you want it. 

Our Representatives arc now going out with their Spring linos. See 

them and make your selection-. 

GEO. H. HEES, SON & CO. Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 






■■■ G EO« H. HEEJLiiON A CfH 



•1311! 



D 



/),•'/ Goods Review 



HOUSE F U R N 1 S II I N (J S 



L89 



."■"TTi rr-;. 



_i «. 




Prime & Rankin Limited 



w 



E announce our readiness to meet 



you with New Prices, and have our 
entire line repriced full}- in keeping 
with present Market quotations. 

Our Salesmen are on their territories, with 
a complete range for Immediate Delivery, 
in Curtains and Drapery Goods — values 
that will at once stimulate trade in these 
lines. 

Advance orders, now in hand, will, in every 
case, be billed at lowest prevailing prices. 



Handkerchiefs 



We are now showing our new range of 
Christmas Handkerchiefs, for usual Fall 
Deliver}'. Every pattern is new — not one 
old number. Our prices are such that we 
solicit your orders in the confidence our 
values are unequalled. 

fe> Prime & Rankin, Limited 



22 Warser Gate 
Nottingham, England 



74 York St., 
Toronto 



>.<>.,<». >: .'■< .■.■■. 






II U S E FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Review 



a 



^Da/snor Cretonnes 




No. 4099—34" wide 

This design comes in three color 
combinations: blue, rose or green. 

3234 c per yard 




No. 4101—36" wide 

A floral pattern coming in four combinations 
with black, fawn, brown or blue background. 

S7}4 c per yard 




No. 4158 37" wide 

This line is an imitation block print 
Jetign and comes in six color combinations. 

49 c per yard 



THREE SPECIAL LINES 
SUGGESTED FOR 
SALE PURPOSES 

The Cretonnes here 
illustrated are of our 
own manufacture. 

The prices are based 
on to-day's lowest 
quotation for grey 
cotton. 



GOODS IN STOCK 

FOR IMMEDIATE 

DELIVERY 



DALY & MORIN, Limited 

Manufacturers of Window Shades, Etc. 
lachine- MONTREAL, que. 



Dry ('on, Is Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



191 



You'll Sell More 

Curtains 

The "(Da/jpOr" Line of Voile, Mar- 
quisette and Scrim Curtains for 
SPRING, 1921, is now ready. It 
contains the finest range of beautiful 
designs, manufactured in the most 
approved manner you could wish to 
see. The new prices are exceedingly 
attractive, and combined with the high 
standard of excellence embodied in the 
curtains, will surely enable you to 
sell more curtains at splendid profit. 

SEE THEM WHEN OUR REPRESENTATIVE CALLS 




PRODUCTS 

Novelty Curtains and 
Piece Goods 

Sectional Window 
and Door Panels 




DALY & MORIN, Limited 

lachine - MONTREAL, que. 



192 



HOUS E FURNISHI N G S 



Dry Goods Review 



■ 1 
It 

$ Those whose pride is in their homes- 

They are the customers that a fuUy-equipped DRAPERY DEPARTMENT will 
attract with an irresistible appeal of interest and inspiration. They appreciate 
draperies of artistic and "quality" appearance thai will set their homes apart for 
distinctive effect-. 

You will find the selection of distinctive rirapings an easy matter in our .-how rooms, 
for our stock ha- Keen mosl carefully chosen. 



PREPARE X()W FOR SPRING SALES 
ALL PRICES KKVTSED 



Nottingham Curtains 
Shadow Cloths 
Aurora Casement Cloth 
Mercerized Poplins 
White and Ecru Madras 



Novelty Curtains 
Muslins 

Bungalow Nets 
Self Color Madras 
Mixed Color Madras 



VISIT US -- 

In the Heart of the 
Dry Goods District 



W'm. Strang & Son 
Glasgow, Scotland 



AGENTS FOR 

Hood. Morton & Co. 

Xcwmilns, Scotland 



Stirling-. \uld & Co. 
Darvel, Scotland 



J. B. HENDERSON & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

ESTABLISHED 30 YEARS 

8o Bav Street :: Toronto 




Pattern 410 24 in. and 36 in. in Stock 

COTT-A-LAP RUG BORDERS, SURROUNDS and FLOOR COVERINGS 

• patterns in stock, 24-in., 36-inr, and 72-in. wide, for Immediate Delivery. 

Our Salesmen are showing samples of Oott-a-!an products which are growing in popularity. 
Inquiries solicited and samples cheerfully submitted. 

SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS 

GREENSHIELDS LIMITED 

Wholesale Distributors of Carpets and Draperies 

MONTREAL 




Dry Goods Hi 



HOUSE F U R N I S II I X G S 



193 




r 

1*** 

IN 
m 






>4 

F 

H 

I 

I*' 

I 



j£ ■ j*l' * *- »i. a & — S. ^^j*s j^j^*-' 



BILTMORE CURTAINS 

Quicken Drapery Sales 
Because Timely and Washable 

Spring is a Biltmore season. With the house- 
wife they appear prominently under the heads 
of Beauty and Economy by reason of (1) their 
charm and originality; (2) their moderate cost 
and long life of service. 

The objective of the Biltmore Curtain Company 
is to maintain in the future, as in the past, a first 
quality line of up-to-the-minute novelties. 

Our line is well known throughout the country 
because of it- long-wearing and easy-washing 
qualities. 

Our Spring showing is a most delightful collec- 
tion of artistic and exclusive patterns. 

Be sure to see our samples. You will not fail to 
recognize the leadership of Biltmore's and their 
possibilities as trade-winners. 



BILTMORE CURTAIN CO., LIMITED 

332 CRAIG ST. W. MONTREAL 




"FOUNTAIN BRAND' 



Satisfaction Plus Economy 

through using 

"FOUNTAIN BRAND" 

PURE IRISH LINEN THREAD 

Manufactured by 

ISLAND SPINNING COMPANY 

LISBURN : IRELAND 



With •'Fountain Brand'' there is no snarling and no broken ends to contend with — 
NO WASTE, ALL VALUE. 

This is what Manufacturers of Clothing and Leather Goods have been wanting. We have it. 
Let a trial convince you. 

Y 2 lb. and 1 lb. Patent Wind Cops; 

1 . 2 and 4 OZ. Spools 

Colors- -Black. White, and Whitey-Brown 



Sole Agents for Canada 

WALTER WILLIAMS & CO., LTD. 



MONTREAL 
308 Read Building 



QUEBEC 
553 St. Valier St. 



VANCOUVER 
217 Crown Building 



TORONTO 

20 Wellington St. W. 



19-1 



K R ADY-TO- VV E A R 



Dry Goods Review 




Models From Paris 



Designed by Ch. Drecoll 



Upper— Exquisite j/rey velvet 
ning wrap with hem formed of 

self tabs "ml wrappy collar of 

squirrel. 

Right- Distinctive street cos- 
tume in pearl grey cloth vevealing 
high choker and deep cuffs smart- 
ly trim inn! with largt /'lack 
buttons. 










Dnj Goods Review 



L95 



Smart Features of One Piece Frocks 

Circular Effects Seen in Skirt and Sleeve — Denned Waist Still Prevails, Though Natural 
Lines Are Invariably Encouraged — Dark Shades Lead for Afternoon Frocks — Brown, 

Navy, Grey and Black Shown Preference. 



INTEREST in new season styles has 
not for a long time now been stim- 
ulated by circus press agent meth- 
ods! New and lovely things are brought 
out, but one season's styles simply merge 
into another, and it almost seems safe to 
say that fashion designers have for ever 
abandoned the idea of changing the shape 
of the female form divine or even ap- 
pearing to change it by the introduction 
of bizarre and freakish styles with "sil- 
houettes" that bulge and flare or nip 
in as did never the human figure. One 
may, therefore, say that there is nothing 
about this Spring's frocks which is rad- 
ically different from last season's. 

Time was when designers seemed to 
feel that they must usher in a new sea- 
son with styles that were so different 
from the ones of the immediately pre- 
ceding season that every woman would 
be compelled to discard her entire ward- 
robe or feel herself hopelessly out of 
style. 

Lower Prices For Spring 

For the coming Spring, two or three 
points stand out when the question of 
dresses comes under consideration. In 
the first place, perhaps price should be 
mentioned. Unquestionably, all apparel 
for Spring will be a great deal cheaper 
than it was last Spring or even this 
Fall and Winter. Then the increased 
width must be borne in mind. Skirts are 
definitely wider, but, except in the cir- 
cular models, there is little flare, and 
the increased width of the straight skirt 
is •not so much greater than that at 
present visible to the casual observer. 
Circular skirts have flare and very ma- 
terial width increases, one separate skirt 
recently seen measured four and a half 
yards at the hem. 

Generally speaking, chemise modiels 
built on straight, simple lines in full 
tunic effect dominate in tailored styles. 
These are of slipover type and are worn 
"over a simple scant slip in a contrasting 
fabric, generally of charmeuse. Coat 
dresses and redingotes are featured" in 
tricotines, serges and taffetas in two- 
fabric combinations, notably georgette, 
and Canton crepe satin or serge. 

In the new frocks, skirt fullness is 
generally drawn in at either side of the 
waist, a flat front and back line being 
sought, if the skirt is of the straight 
type. The circular skirt naturally has 
no extra fullness to be disposed of at 
the waist line. The chemise frock this 
season is often robbed of its severe 
straightness of line by being drawn in a 
little at either side. This has the effect 
of bringing about a trifling hip flare 
which is approved in the season's selec- 
tions of silhouettes. 




A Spring Challenge 

Spring sunshine could not fail to shine 
nor Spring flowers to bloom when they be- 
come aware that Dame Fashion has created 
such frocks as these to grace the thorough- 
fares during the early season. Grey gab- 
ardine, of course, is the fabric chosen and 
grey soutaohe is used for the conventional 
trimming motifs. The draped hat is grey, 
grey are the suede shoes, silk hose and 
gloves. A grey fox scarf is carried. — 
Designed for Dry Goods Review. 



Sleeves 
Flare effects are frequently introduc- 
ed into sleeves as well as in skirts this 
Spring, the latter, however, presents a 
more varied effect than the description 
"circular" conjures up. Sometimes the 
literally circular line is worked out, 
but more often the effect is brought 
about by the use of the godet or V- 
shaped panel set into an otherwise 
straight skirt. However, genuinely cir- 
cular sleeves are frequently employed 
both in dresses of silk and in wool fa- 
bric frocks of the tailored type. For ex- 
ample, a circular cap or cape may top 



a full length sleeve, or the sleeve may 
fit from the shoulder to elbow and be 
finished with a flaring circular ruffl : 
that reaches to the wrist. The three- 
quarter or below the elbow length sleeve 
is pre-eminent, and the flaring cuff ap- 
pears in a thousand variations. 

Adjustable collars are numerous, that 
is, a collar that may be worn high and 
snug about the neck or left open with 
equally good effect. The high neck fad 
appears likely to predominate for street 
dresses. 

Afternoon Models 

Very few models of afternoon or semi- 
evening frocks have yet been seen in Can- 
adian show-rooms, but a few smart mo- 
dels from American style centres have 
been imported which indicate the trend 
of the style apparently in an authorita- 
tive manner. Crepe meteor, crepe de 
Chine, in fact, all the silks available 
with crepe weave, are in high favor for 
the coming season, both for frocks and 
blouses. The heavier crepe fabrics are 
used lavishly for suits and wraps. Lace, 
both black and colored, will take pre- 
cedence over silks, however, for the 
smartest afternoon frocks, and to judge 
from the newest importations, every 
color of the rainbow will be represented. 

Embroidery is to be as strong as 
ever, and vividly colored versions will 
probably predominate, such as henna 
silk braiding or solid embroidery upon 
black grounds or the application of odd 
novelties like acorn tops, celluloid ovals, 
leather scraps, etc., amidst a tracery of 
other embroidery. The liking for tinsel 
effects will continue until the Summer, 
and beading is finding an outlet even 
upon Spring suits of navy tricotine. Eye- 
let embroidery is promised upon wool- 
len fabrics and many novel arfd smart 
galons and braids are cleverly utilized 
to vary the conventional lines of the 
dresses. 

Among the afternoon dresses noticed 
this month was one of golden brown 
crepe meteor, embroidered in peacock 
feather motifs in natural colors. The 
ribbon girdle was of green velvet rib- 
bon. The hem of the frock was of un- 
even length, a style feature which is 
quite in evidence in the Spring models. 
A very stunning cloth dress noticed 
was of navy tricotine with a vest and 
entire front section heavily braided with 
red silk soutache braid, and with motifs 
of red broadcloth appliqued on. This 
frock buttoned right up to the chin and 
had flaring three-quarter sleeves. 

The Defined Waist 

With a few smart exceptions the 
French and American clothes show the 
Continued on page 199 






Dry Goods /»'• view 



Spring Blouses are Colorful 

Enjoy Freedom in Style as to Length, Fabric and Ornamentation — Paris Furnishes Manx- 
Smart Novelties and Still Sponsors the Smart Yestee in Suit Costumes. 



FROM Paris comes the following 
note regarding: the prevailing and 
coming- style in blouses, sponsored 
by one of the most important of French 
fashion houses: 

"Two distinct types of blouse will be 
favored this season; first when it is a 
question of a dressy affair, worn under 
a long coat or wrap, the long cassock- 
blouse of printed silk, jersey or brocade 
is excessively smart when glimpsed 
through the coat opening. These cassock 
blouses must be absolutely straight, be- 
ing inspired after the lines of the chem- 
ise-gown yet with a "volant" effect of 
pleating at the hips, or an ornament ad- 
justed in such a way as to convey the 
new idea of hip fullness. Nevertheless, 
pronounced puffy effects, which are not 
draped with the utmost art must be care- 
fully avoided; the hip drapery needs to 
be skilfully handled above all things. 

Of course any of the new embroidered 
fabrics, and soft, dull brocades may be 
used equally well for these charming- 
conceits. It is such a practical fashion 
for women wha have not a great number 
of afternoon gowns and should be em- 
phasized during the coming Spring, for 
with a skirt of velvet or black satin, a 
variety of smart effects may be achiev- 
ed. 

Under the coat of the tailored suit, the 
shirt-waist is now preferred to the sheer 
blouse. The former must not be an 
over-skirt effect, it must be worn inside 
the skirt and with a leather belt, or it 
may conceal the skirt belt by a clever 
fold of • itself, which however, does not 
descend upon the hips even so much as 
one inch. The skirts are smartest when 
quite plain in front and behind, the ne- 
cessary fullness being drawn to each 
side and held if necessary by buttons 
or elastic. At present the very high 
neck is in favor, but the open style will 
doubtless have its devotees a little later. 
The white crepe-de-Chine blouse is al- 
ways accompanied by its cravat of black 
moire ribbon. 

The Vest Survives. 

Paris is showing an increasing interest 
in the "gilet" or vest as the season ad- 
vances. Every season it is announced 
that no more vests will be worn but 
they appear just the same in a delight- 
fully novelty variety, which always 
seems; different than the preceding sea- 
son's showing. Vests are shown with 
both open and closed neck lines, but 
it must be confessed that the majority 
of women remain faithful to the open 
line, shaped in V-fashion, which is infin- 
itely more becoming than the choker 
style. The rage just now is the Rus- 



£& 




IK* 



Handmade Model 

A lovely blouse of heavy cream crepe de 
chine showing inset sections of tucking 
fagotted to the model. A tie of black moire 
is run through slashes. — Shown by courtesy 
of American Waist Co., Montreal. 



sian style gilet which closes down the 
right side from chin to knee. The more 
dressy vest comes with sleeves of a con- 
trasting fabric, say of crepe-de-Chine or 
of silk voile. Brocaded silks are much 
liked for the superb vests "Louis XV" 
style, with shawl collar crossed very low 
and fastened by jewelled buttons. 

A modification of the vest is the sep- 
arate collar which is so useful trans- 
forming the neckline of blouses just now. 
These collars come in all sorts and des- 
criptions of models but those for Win- 
ter are best made of tulle, lace or silk, 
whilst 'organdies, linens, etc., are pre- 
ferable for the Spring costume of tail- 
ored lines. All the pretty ribbons and 
bandings of silk and wool, embroidered 
ribbons or velvets are being much used 
to make these odd little collars which 
add an amusing note to the usual conven- 
tional costume." 

The above communication is of inter- 
est in view of the fact that few blouses 
are being worn in Paris nowadays — all 
the attention being given to one piece 
dresses. With the unpleasant shortage 
of coal which prevails still in France, 
Parisiennes are glad to adopt such extra 
accessories as will combine with warmth 
and hence the universal acceptation of 
the vest. 



But the fact remains that the long- 
blouse has yet to create interest for it- 
self in Canada; the semi-long blouse is 
undoubtedly popular but the very long 
chemise model lacks the appeal which 
was anticipated. From American man- 
ufacturers the word comes that except 
in the range of lingerie or severely tail- 
ored mannish blouses, few waist-length, 
tuck-in models are shown, the majority 
by all odds being about hip length, 
or "volant" as the makers term it. There 
is a tendency to feature uneven lengths, 
and some of the new blouses are short 
at front and back with longer side sec- 
tions, while others have front and back 
panels that are somewhat elongated 
with the sides more than waist length, 
and so on. 

Slip Over Kimona Styles 

One such model noted was a smart 
b'ouse of henna georgette, with the pep- 
luin in uneven length. The blouse was 
designed on kimona lines as a slip-over 
model and was embellished with black, 
jet bead embroidery done in an all- 
over scroll design. 

Sleeve lengths are varied, some hav- 
ing the extremely short lengths, while- 
others end just a trifle below the elbow. 
The long tight wrist buttoned closely 
up the arm is also shown, but it is un 
certain how they will be accepted. The 
average woman's elbow is the least at- 
tractive part of the arm, and both dress 
and blouse designers seem to have taken 
this fact into consideration when design 
ing apparel for this Spring. Very few 
extremely short sleeves are seen. 

Collars are rarely . seen except upon 
the tailored lines, in which cases the con- 
vertible neck predominates. In fancy- 
blouses there is a tendency to get away 
from the low round neck-line and adopt 
a more oval outline deepening into a V 
in front for slip-over styles and a square 
neck softened with a touch of white 
in the vestee models. When collars are- 
used, they are small and the modified 
Peter Pan style is used a good deal for 
young girls' blouses. 

Spring Materials 

Materials for Spring show great lati- 
tude as might be expected after the re- 
cent declines in cost of so many different 
fabrics, and although many authorities 
affect disdain of the ever popular georg- 
ette it nevertheless reappears under 
many fascinating new guises, beaded, 
embroidered and inset with plaques of 
contrasting color. One house which 
specializes in hand made blouses an- 
nounces its leading fabrics as follows: 
Continued on page 199 



J)ni Goods Review 



191 



Suits that Will Make a Spring Debut 

Present Conditions Influencing Manufacturers of Women's Costumes — Models Developed 
Principally in Navy and Tan Tricotine — Box Coats and Slightly Fitted Styles Pre- 
vail — More Serviceable Ideas Being Observed in Trimmings and Linings 

to Meet Present Requirements. 



JUST as dignity and richness were 
the dominating- notes of the pre- 
sent winter's style trend, so na- 
turalness and youthful charm find fitting' 
expression in the array of models chosen 
by the designers to represent the coming- 
season's fashion. Beneath the surface ap- 
peal of jaunty cut and clever ornamen 
tation, however, a singular similarity 
becomes distinctly apparent. Not a 
similarity of idea in so far as monoton- 
ous repetition of styles are concerned but 
more of an unconscious endeavor to- 
wards conservative style in keeping with 
the economy of the times, wherein such 
important factors as exquisite workman- 
ship, high quality and absence of useless 
ornament are a pleasant change from 
the over elaborate conceptions evolved 
in. the name of fashion in the past, with 
little care for anything- else but the sell- 
ing- price. 

Few Montreal makers of better class 
suits are showing anything but navy 
blue or tan tricotine in their advance 
models. They state that this is only 
because of uncertain conditions but one 
is tempted to hope that the women of 
Canada will at last recognize the per- 
ennial and undying charm of navy blue 
and will accept the tentative offerings of 
their own manufacturers without turn- 
ing- aside after strange gods. 

Two Distinct Styles 

After one has become accustomed to 
■the conservative note of color and fabric, 
one is next impressed by the fact that 
there are two distinct styles in suits. 
Roughly speaking, the divisions may be 
classified as girls' and matrons' styles, 
but a close inspection reveals the fact 
that girls may wear the tailored, close- 
fitting suits offered for more mature 
figures while slender matrons may don 
the jaunty short jacket suits with grace. 
However women may feel about it, the 
fact remains that no ready-to-wear de- 
partment should be without representa- 
tive models of each style. 

Perhaps the short coat suit is the new- 
er and more Spring-like in character, 
featuring as it does the hip length box 
style, loose-fitting and unbelted in most 
cases. Boleros with vests and semi- 
fitted effects with belts are also shown. 
In the latter style curved underarm 
seams or inverted pleats in the skirt 
give the proper flare at the lower edge. 
Bloused over effects in cape-back effect 
are also very popular and often fasten 
at the throat in front with a double but- 
ton on a cord. The collars are exceed- 
ingly unobstrusive, usually in low turn- 




The New Influence 

This jaunty Spring model is developed in 
navy tricotine and exploits the curved 
under-arm seam, the narrow shoulder and 
smart sleeve novelty. Silver embroidery 
mounted on black satin forms the vest sec- 
tions and simulates large patch pockets. — 
Shown by Greenberg, Smith & Co., Mont- 
real. 



over effect or in narrow military styles. 
In strictly tailored models, the mannish 
notched collar is again seen. 

Speaking generally, the silhouette for 
Spring emphasizes the uncorseted effect, 
with a modified dropped waistline and a 
tendency to eliminate all curves. 

The majority of sleeves in suits in- 
tended for Canadian women are set in 
plainly with a narrow shoulder, all full- 
ness being eliminated. In the dressy 
models, and those intended for the de- 



butantes, the three-quarter sleeve is 
shown, but in tailored models the full 
length and snugly fitting cuff is pre- 
ferred, and looks exceedingly smart worn 
with a leather gauntlet. The shorter 
cuffs nearly always flare or are finished 
off with an oddly designed strap. 

Belts and I'ockets Scarce 

The leather belt fad of last Spring is 
quite dead. In its place narrow girdles 
of the cloth are sometimes used, but in 
the majority of cases the belt is a minus 
quantity. Very few pockets are seen on 
coats, except here and there a tiny slit 
upon the loose box coats, which, however, 
as scarcely visible. Vests are frequently 
shown as they lend themselves admir- 
ably to the youthfulness of the short 
coats and very often reveal more of their 
colorful contrast at the waist line than 
above. The tendency is for the coats 
to flare sharply from collar to lower edge 
in inverted V-shape. Heavy figured 
silks, metallic and embroideries and even 
plain velours and linens are shown in the 
vests for Spring. 

Trimmings 

When suit coats have a plain skirt 
effect, a lavish use is made of embroid- 
ery in solid and chainstitched combin- 
ations. When the coats are of the box 
variety, they are more often braided in 
narrow hercules braid or else the edges 
are bound with it. In any case the em- 
broidery or braid is self-colored when the 
suit is of another shade than navy. On 
the later color all black is preferred, al- 
though oxydized silver is a novel varia- 
tion, an illustration of which is shown. 

Suit Skirts 

The average length from the ground 
for Spring skirts will be from 8 to 11 
inches, the width will be very little dif- 
ferent from this winter's measurement, 
namely, 1 1-4 to 1 1-2 yards. The ma- 
jority are plain and are simply gathered 
under a narrow belt at the normal waist 
line as in the past. Most skirts of this 
type show two small inset slanting 
pockets, finished with crows-feet at the 
corners. The flat back skirt in circular 
effect is insidiously creeping into popu- 
larity but the short accordion-pleated 
skirt is not dead either and accompanies 
the jaunty boleros to perfection in 
misses' model. Here and there a 
flying panel or looped effect varies the 
monotony of plainness. Often a wide 
girdle of crushed charmeuse ribbon fin- 
ishes the waist line of the short coat 
models. 

Continued on page 200 



= 



READY-TO-WEAR 



Clothing Makers Optimistic 

Outlook Very Promising 

President of Cloak and Suit Manufacturers' Association of Mont- 
real Claims That Present Conditions Will Raise Standard 
of Production — Smart, Practical Styles 
Bein.: F.volved. 



(jTTT HAT reasons have I for ex- 
Y/Y/ pecting a good season?" re- 
" " marked the president of the 
Cloak and Suit Manufacturers' Associ- 
ation, of Montreal, when interviewed this 
month. "Why just because conditions 
are bad, and they will oblige everyone 
of us to be on his mettle to do the very 
best he can. Of course we will come out 
all right; we've got lots of things on our 
side. For one thing the luxury tax is off, 
which will eliminate the difficulties of 
producing underneath a limit price. We 
all feel we're going to sell goods, our 
travellers are full of enthusiasm over the 
new samples and are going after business 
harder than ever. We manufacturers 
have spent more money on samples this 
season than ever before and are going 
right ahead on production, with every 
hope that we'll be successful. We are 
emphasizing popular priced lines, of 
course, but we have endeavored to put 
more quality than ever before into every 
garment we turn out, and it is a long 
time since designers have evolved such 
smart, practical lines which are youth- 
ful and artistic, without any over-elabor- 
ation or extreme tendencies. 

"We intend to force new standards of 
production," he continued, "and we man- 
ufacturers are very sanguine of getting 
merchandise produced, on a basis of a 
25 per cent, reduction of costs through 
arrangements which have been effected 
to increase individual output. Unem- 
ployment is the only thing against us at 
present, as this condition naturally tends 
to discourage buying, but I believe that 
the confidence of the public can be re- 
stored when it can be made to feel that 
merchandise is at the- right and fair 
price, which will not jump to-day nor 
drop to-morrow. The whole trouble with 
trade last year was the fear which filled 
the customers' minds lest the bottom 
had not been reached and that they would 
save money by delaying purchasing. 

"This year we have made our prices 
right and we have figured them as low 
as possible, so that the public may not 
again feel that its faith has been mis- 
placed. We are going after the 'bread 
and butter' trade, or in other words, the 
great mass of the public, not only those 
who always have purchased from us." 
Although the recent request of the 
Ladies' Garment Workers for an in- 
crease of wages of $8.00 per week was 
lecently refused by the arbitration 
board representing the Cloak, Skirt, 
Dress, Waist and Raincoat Makers' Un- 
ion, of Montreal, and the Cloak and Suit 



Manufacturing Association, yet the work- 
ers have expressed themselves as satis- 
fied with the result of the award, accord- 
ing to the president. The request was re- 
fused for the time being owing to un- 
settled conditions, but may be reopened 




Dry Goods Review 

for consideration whenever conditions 
change. 

Although there might be some discrep- 
ancies between the wages paid in Mont- 
real and in other centres, the president 
of the association pointed out that it did 
not necessarily follow that the Montreal 
workers suffered a disadvantage. Where- 
as markets in other large centres are 
practically at a standstill, conditions in 
Montreal are exceedingly promising. 
The agreement now in force provides in 
part that the workers shall "in propor- 
tion to their knowledge, experience, 
stregth and ability, undertake to pro- 
duce in quantity and in quality and 
with the same zeal as though each were 
in business for himself." 

The one point upon which both workers 
and makers are concentrating, is the 
discovery of some means whereby slack 
seasons may be abolished. If work un- 
dertaken can be valued in advance and 
production kept at a standardized rate, 
the evils attendant upon an unbalanced 
work period will be greatly relieved. 

The spirit of optimism and energy 
now felt in the ready-to-wear trade 
should undoubtedly react to the utter- 
most circles of the merchandising world 
and help on the cause of readjustment. 



A Belted Model 

Long, slim lines are achieved in this smart 
little costume which relies on its simplicity 
of design and unusual decorative treatment 
for its modishness. Note the fashionable 
tuxedo line of the collar. — Shown by court- 
esy of fireenberg & Smith Co., Montreal. 



COSTUME ACCESSORIES 

Continued from page 183 

chain. This is wound around the wrist 
any number of times, and in the same 
way the French women wear their real 
pearl necklaces. 

A great deal of the Oriental and the 
Egyptian motif is used in the new neck 
chains, some of these made with cor- 
deliere tops, colored silk cords to match 
the pendants that trim them. The pend- 
ants are imitations of the scarab and the 
beetle, set with tiny colored stones in 
attractive color combination. Other cor- 
delieres have slides of filigree metal and 
beads set through the cord, with large 
tassels of beads weighting them down. 

The vogue of pearl jewellery is very 
strong in Paris just now and long neck 
chains of white metal are set closely in 
tiny pearls and finished in a thick tassel 
made entirely of the pearl. All the 
tassel effects of this sort, done either 
in the metal chain or the beads, finish 
many of the necklaces. 

There is a great deal being done this 
season with cut crystal in all sorts of 
effects, the stones used in good looking 
neck chains, in hatpins, bracelets and 
pendants. There are lockets of hard 
enamel to be worn on a cordeliere, these 
set in marcassites and trimmed in ster- 
ling silver. In the hatpins there is much 
variety of shape but the one thing which 
they all must have is the bangle that 
swings free from the pin. 

Large oval pins show hand-painted 
silk in a dainty little flower design en- 
cased in a delicate metal frame. Added 
this season to the line is a series of bar 
pins set in colored stones, and there are 
imitation ivory carved pendants also. 



Di-n (roods Revieu 



K K A I) V -TO - W K A K 



L99 



SPUING BLOUSES ARE COLORED 

Continued from page 106 

Firs!, georgettes in high shades, trim- 
med with filet and laces, Richelieu em- 
broidery, punch work and beading; sec- 
ond, crepe de Chine in very tailored 
models with tuxedo collars, accordion 
pica led and knife pleated fronts. Also, 
pussy willow bilks and plain crepe de 
Chines for semi-tailored blouses for 
wearing with combination colored skirls 
of sports design. 

From another Montreal manufacturer 
comes the announcement that Spring, 
1921, will see much fine cotton voile used, 
even in high class models, and the 'fad 
for drawn work and fine filet edgings 
will be continued and elaborated upon 
more artistically than ever. Little 
touches of colored hand embroidery will 
be much used upon the simple slip-over 
voile blouses which tie in the back, and 
the tiniest of narrow colored pipings will 
match the embroideries and outline neck 
and sleeve edges. Vividly colored plain 
cottons also make up into most seductive 
blouses for wear with white skirts dur- 
ing the coming Summer. One such 
model of old rose was embroidered in 
floss silks in shades of blue and black 
and fastened down the front with tiny 
black buttons, which were repeated upon 
the belt of the low-waisted model. Other 
equally delightful novelties were made 
of sheer cross barred voiles in blues, 
mauves and pinks, with tuxedo or small 
collars of white pique and cuffs to match. 
Ocean pearl buttons of the finest quality 
add much of the distinctiveness which 
characterizes these inexpensive yet 
thoroughly up-to-date blouses. 

New York is especially fond of the 
batiste blouse in white and bright colors, 
especially when made quite simply with 
long snug sleeves and semi-tuxedo col- 
lar. The latter usually has squared ends 
which almost resemble jabots in their 
fullness. 

In both dressy blouses and tailored 
creations the vivid colors have the pre- 
ference. Two shades particularly al- 
ready promise to be great favorites, 
namely, porcelain blue and rattan, which 
is rather a pale greenish tan. The all 
black blouse is still enormously popular, 
especially when worn with a wide girdle 
of georgeously colored ribbon in em- 
bossed, brocaded or changeable effects. 
The sash lends length to the waist line 
and by tying a large bow on one side, 
an extremely smart effect is achieved. 
Henna and scarlet will continue to lead 
for Spring. 

The liking for metallic fabric effects 
is strong at present but is not likely to 
be so pronounced when warm weather 
approaches. Silk tricot promises to con- 
tinue its vogue and many odd and ori- 
ginal designs are spoken of for wear 
with the skirts of the same fabric. 

Among the newest imported models 
seen in Montreal shops was one, a hip- 
length blouse of geranium colored crepe 
de Chine, with narrow roll collar and 
cuffs of gray self fabric, the entire 




For May time 



This charming little model is developed 
in Nile green linen and has all its modish 
features accentuated by the presence of 
smart, deep green bands cut on the bias. 
The captivating chapeau is fine black 
Milan faced and draped with rose pink silk. 



blouse being pretty well covered with 
embroidery in gray angora. The motif 
worked out in the embroidery is very 
simple, consisting merely of crosswise 
lines done in a darning or basting stitch, 
broken by little fluffy knobs or knots 
suggestive of flowers. 

The use of strappings of black ribbons 
against vivdly colored blouses is much 
liked. Appliqued motifs of self fabric 
in contrasting color or a different fabric 
from the garment are popular trimmings, 
both for blouses and frocks. 

Spring styles seem destined to appear 
earlier than usual, due to the fact that 
Fall and Winter buying has betn light 
and both manufacturers and retailers 
want to stimulate business by new mer- 
dise. 



BOOSTING THE AVERAGE SIZE OF 
A SALE 

Continued from page 169 

"And then comes the study of the in- 
troduction of merchandise. For instance, 
a customer will wander up to the notions 
counter to order a paper of pins. The 
efficient saleswoman will engage her 
interest in a new kind of embroidery silk 



or a ne it elastic tape that can be readily 
adjusted. She will sell the.;e to the cus- 
tomer who just wanted a five cent paper 
of pin , an 1 nine cases out of ten she 
will direct her to a counter where there 
is' a specially attractive offering in some 
other line that the clever little sales giri 
thinks will interest her particular cus- 
tomer." 

There are many ways in wh'ch the 
Stanley Mills Company are putting theii 
theory into practice, and they declare 
thai as the years roll by the truism, 
so pithily phrased by the Prince of Mer- 
chants is one that should never be 
lightly considered by the merchant who 
wants to make his business bigger and 
better as time goes on. This is a good 
idea for the New Year and might be 
marked down among the merchant's 
business resolutions. 

For to-day, more than ever before, 
a good selling idea is worth its weight 
in gold and the. merchant who has mer- 
chandise to sell must first get the cus- 
tomers into his store and then be able 
to keep them there. 



SMART FEATURES OF ONE-PIECE 
FROCKS 

Continued from page 195 

waist line defined, but not compressed. 
Evening gowns show this tendency best 
in two distinct manners. One style of 
gown which is suitable for more mature 
figures is the long sheath-like draped 
princess line, with a train generally or 
a sweeping side panel effect. Such a 
one was a new arrival at a Montreal 
department store recently and was made 
of white brocaded satin, combined with 
plain white satin and trimmed with black 
jet bugle fringe and long strings of 
black jet beads from shoulder to knees. 
The bodice was softly draped across the 
back, which was cut a trifle lower than 
the front and the plain fabric was con- 
tinued round to the front where it form- 
ed a low and becoming girdle. The 
skirt was plain and rather short. A 
double train of the plain satin was 
used at either side, and the gown was 
quite typical of the newest ideas in eve- 
ning apparel. 

For the debutante, another style is 
shown. The bodice is fitted quite tight- 
ly and worn with a full gathered taf- 
feta or lace skirt, sometimes distended 
by the use of wiring underneath. These 
are exceedingly becoming to "slim young 
things," and are quite early Victorian in 
type. Practically all the smartest eve- 
ning gowns are cut very low in the 
back and the prevailing fad is to have 
merely two wide ribbon straps support- 
ing the back of the bodice. 

The pastel shades are preferred for 
young girls and black or the rich bro- 
caded fabrics by the matrons, but the 
tendency in afternoon frocks is to favor 
dark shades such as nigger brown, steel 
gray and black. Navy blue is said to 
be not quite so smart for the time be- 
ing. 



■2in) 



K K.\ DY-TO- W K A K 



Uru Goods Revii w 



British Industries Fair, 

London, Birmingham, Glasgow 

Complete Arrangements Have Now Been Made — British Overseas 

Department Will Render Assistance to Canadian Buyers 

— F. W. Field in Charge. 



ARRANGEMENTS have now been 
completed for the reception of a 
record number of visitors to the 
British Industries Fair, which opens on 
the 21st of February at London and 
Birmingham, and on the 28th of Feb- 
ruary at Glasgow. 

The first British Industries Fair was 
held in London in 1915, and the success 
which has attended the fairs held since 
that date has satisfied the Department 
of Overseas Trade as to the correctness 
of the system of organization. The com- 
ing fair, though vastly increased in size 
and comprising the largest number of 
exhibitors of British and Colonial manu- 
factures ever assembled in one trade 
fair, will be run on the lines which 
proved so successful in the past. 

As only genuine trade buyers are in- 
vited, all who visit the fair are known 
to be there for business and not for 
curiosity. Exhibitors are therefore able 
to give proper attention to the buyer and 
the buyer is able to do his business un- 
hampered by crowds of sightseers. 

The services which are rendered to the 
invited buyer do not end with the mere 
bringing together under one roof of the 
chief British manufactures. Every pos- 
sible assistance is given to him in find- 
ing the particular articles he wishes to 
buy. The resources of the British 
Government are at his call. In the Fair 
buildings the Department of Overseas 
Trade opens fully staffed offices in order 
that buyers and exhibitors may obtain 
authentic information on all points of 
importance. F. W. Field, the British 
Government Trade Commissioner at 
Toronto, will be in attendance at the 
London Fair and will be pleased to meet 
ami assist all visitors from the Dominion. 
Other officers of the Department will be 
ava : lable to answer inquiries as to tariffs 
in all parts of the world. A special staff 
gives information as to shipping and 
transport and other officials are prepar- 
ed to advise as to the most likely sources 
of sunply, not only of the articles in- 
cluded in the Fair, but also of all Empire 
productions. Such assistance is of in- 
calculable value. 

The Department's help does not stop 
with advice and information. Material 
arrangements are made for the buyer's 
comfort and assistance at the Fair. In- 
terpreters are provided for his use free 
of charge. Special writing rooms are 
set anart for his convenience, where he 
can carry on his correspondence. Special 
Po«t Offices deal with his letters and 
telegrams. Restaurants and tea rooms 



make it unnecessary for hirii to leave 
the Fair buildings to get his meals. 

Visitors to the Fair also receive valu- 
able assistance from the manner in 
which the catalogues at the Fair are 
produced. Instead of being mere lists 
of the names of the exhibitors, they are 
books of reference in which they can 
find in their own language a classified in- 
dex of every article exhibited. Supple- 
mentary pages contain tables of English 
and foreign weights and measures com- 
pared; and the moneys of all the principal 
countries are compared with the English 
equivalents. 

The catalogues are not sold, but are 
handed gratis to all visitors to the Fair 
from overseas. Their contents, serving 
as they do, as books of reference for the 
year, and consulted regularly in all parts 
of the world, are edited with expert 
knowledge by selected officers of the 
Department of Overseas Trade and the 
local committees. 

Buyers from overseas who wish to 
visit the Fair should apply as early as 
possible to the nearest British Trade 
Commissioner at Montreal, Toronto, or 
Winnipeg, from whom they will be able 
to secure full information. On their ar- 
rival in England it would be to their 
advantage to communicate at once with 
the Secretary, British Industries Fair, 
35 Old Queen Street, London, S.W., or 
should the Fair have commenced, at the 
White City, Shepherd's Bush, London, 
W. 14. 

Intending visitors will do well to se- 
cure hotel accommodation in advance. 
Messrs Thomas Cook and Sons will 
provide every facility for doing this. 



SUITS THAT WILL MAKE A SPRING 
DEBUT 

Continued from page 197 

All kinds of linings are noted, the 
newest being very rich sof£ messalines 
or pussy willows in shades exactly match- 
ing the suits or in biscuit shade. 

A lavish use is made of fancy bone 
buttons which, however, are more often 
found on sleeves than on the coat fronts. 
Very often a single button, or even two 
or three are all that grace the opening, 
but at least half a dozen run from cuff 
to elbow, depending largely upon their 
size. 

Some of the Models 

One Montreal house which makes very 
exclusive models is showing a tan tri- 
cotine suit, with 30-inch box coat. The 



lower edge of the coat is van dycked in 
sharp points which are bound with nar- 
row silk braid. Another coat is braided 
in white in triangle designs straight 
across the coat skirt. A tinsel sash 
makes a novel finish. 

Another quaintly fitted coat is heav- 
ily embroidered in black and red upon 
its navy tricotine. A third variation of 
the embroidery theme was a mingling 
of dull blue, black and white upon a 
navy suit of Poiret twill, which had a 
long shawl collar and widj Mating cuiFs. 
A satin girdle belt made a soft finish 
at the waist line. 

Quite devoid of ornamentation were 
other models noticed, which were se- 
verely yet perfectly designed on man- 
nish lines of navy serge, semi-fitted with 
fairly long lines, bound with military 
braid and buttoned with plain horn but- 
tons. Simple in effect, but expressive of 
the very essence of smartness. These 
will undoubtedly be the first choice of the 
woman to whom conservatism and econ- 
omy are terms of the highest impor- 
tance. 

Still other models of rough Irish 
tweeds in smart mixtures of browns, 
greens and greys with patch pockets 
and yokes and belts were reminiscent of 
sports and country wear. Combination 
belts of cloth and leather were a unique 
feature of the tweed costumes. 

Separate Coats 

The "wrappy coat" is still with us, and 
reappears in more charming variations 
than ever. Developed in such soft fa- 
brics as Dewet de Laines, velours, etc., 
the effects are soft and voluminous. The 
preferred length appears to be that 
which just covers the skirt hem, although 
3-4 and 7-8 lengths are also shown. 

Few belted models are shown as yet, 
excepting- in the bloused back styles 
which feature a lowered waist line. 

The sleeves are usually in the kimona 
effect or else in rag] an style, the idea 
being to preserve and accentuate as much 
as possible the natural lines of the body. 
Capes are shown again both tailored 
and plain styles. 

There are no more large collars to be 
noticed on any of the separate wraps 
for Spring, the newest finish being the 
small or flat roll collars which are neat 
and inconspicuous. 

Sports coats of heavy polo cloth in 
light colors with or without a fancy 
colored stripe are being featured by one 
Montreal manufacturer. These havje 
clever belts of the cloth, fastened by 
smart ivory buckles. 



ON VACATION 

Miss Mclntyre, the genial head of 
the Brumpton & Gaetz Co., dry goods 
department, has resigned her position 
in Red Deer, Alta, and gone to her home 
in Revelstoke. Miss Mclntyre's many 
friends will be pleased to know she will 
return to Alberta after a month's rest 
and will take a similar position not far 
from Red Deer. 



I/rn (foods Rcvit a 



It K A D V -TO- W E A K 



20: 




iOHTS 



207 S. Catherine St. West, Montreal 

" GARMENTS OF THE BETTER KIND " 



COAT, 



THIS SEASON 



particularly it will be distinctly to your advant- 
age to defer your placing until you have seen 
our elaborate collection of styles, at our salesrooms or with our sales- 
men now on the road. 



The McElroy Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

^Garments 




FAMOUS FOR THEIR 



Fit, Cut, Style, 

Hang and Finish 

HEAD OFFICE: 

47 Simcoe St. - Toronto 



Brook Manufg. Co., Ltd. 

Northampton, Eng. 

Cotton Underskirts 

Import or Stock 

Eastern Agenl: 

P. M. LEMAISTRE 

10 Victoria Street 
MONTREAL 



Monaker Dress 

Manufacturing Company 

Makers of Wedding, Evening 
and Afternoon gowns. Priced 
from $11.75 to $30.00. 

A Visit to our show-rooms 
will convince you. 

Room 204 

591 St. Catherine St. West 

MONTREAL 



Genuine Leather 
Novelty Coats 

IN LADIES' and MEN'S 
Write for Samples 

437 St. Paul St.West, Montreal. 



Waists and Skirts 



Try us for your rush orders for 
Voile, Crepe, Silk and Georgette 
Waists, also Wash Skirts. Sam- 
ples sent prepaid upon request. 



®M 




1187 Mt. Royal Ave., Montreal 



OUR MEN ARE OUT 

LOOK FOR 
THEM 

La Mode Dress Co. 

Room 200, 591 St. Catherine W. 
MONTREAL 



J. W. JOHNS 

Manufacturer and Exporter of 

IRISH PATTERN CROCHET 

LACE WORK 

Doylies of all sizes, Duchess Sets, Table 
Centres, Table Runners, Tray Cloths, 
Tea Cosey Covers, Collars of Different 
Patterns, Camisole Tops, Yokes, Dress- 
in? Sacques, Jackets, Night Gown Yokes, 
Hand Bags, Babies' Bonnets, Medallions, 
etc., etc. 

Liberal Discounts 
Write for Samples and Prices. 

J. W. JOHNS, P.O. BOX 836 
Rangoon, Burma 



BOYS' and GIRLS' 

SPRING COATS 

in all colors and styles, ages 

3 to 10 years, in 
TRICOTINES, GABAR- 
DINES, CHEVIOTS, ETC. 

Special line Navy Blue Cheviot 
Reefers with Naval Trim- 
mings. 

IDEAL DRESS GO. 

1488c St. Lawrence Boulevard. Montreal 



Compliments of 

THE SEASON 

to our 
Many Customers and Friends 



The S. & D. Dress Co. 

142 PEEL STREET 

(A few doors above Windsor Hotel) 

MONTREAL 



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/'/■// Goods I!' I'n a 

miiMiniiuiimimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii: 



GENERAL TRADE NEWS 



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Veteran Merchant 

Dies at Dresden, Ont. 

I. ate Robert Aikin in Business for Half 

a Century Dies Following Month's 

Illness, at age of 84 Years 

In the death on Christmas morning, 
December 25, 1920, of Robert Aikin, in 
Dresden, western Ontario loses one of 
her oldest and most highly respected 
business men. 

?>Ir. Aikin had been a leading dry goods 
merchant, having been in business for 50 
years. Although in his 84th year when 
illness suddenly overtook him, Mr. Aikin 
had been active in mercantile and pub- 
lic life within a month of his death. He 
had been exceptionally active, remark- 
ally regular in attendance to business 
and keenly interested in public affairs. 

At different times during his career he 
had held office as school trustee, council- 
lor, reeve, mayor, and had been a member 
of the I.O.O.F. for more than 40 years, 
and was one of the official members of 
the Methodist Church. 

Ten years ago on Christmas morning 
the late Mr. Aikin was injured in the dis- 
astrous fire and explosion which totally 




THE LATE ROBERT AIKIN 

destroyed his store and in which Rev. G. 
H. Long and D. V. Hicks were killed. 

The veteran merchant was born near 
the town of Perth, after which he lived in 
Hamilton, later moving to Dresden. 



£111111111 



III 



llllllll 




The W . R. Brock Co! s Warehouse, 

Montreal | 

Owing to the fact that a tut of another building was sup- 
plied, in error, for the W. R. Brock Company's advertisement 
on pace 74 of this issue, Dry Goods Review is reproducing 
above a true illustration of the company's warehouse building 
in Montreal. — 

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He is survived by his widow, his two 
daughters, Mrs. L. B. Cronk, of Guelph, 
Miss Eva at home, Russell, of Detroit, 
Mich., and Charles, of Dresden, Ont. 

The business of which the late Mr. 
Aikin had been the head for so many 
years is considered one of the best in 
the western part of the province and will 
be continued by Mr. Chas. Aikin, who 
had been actively engaged with his 
father for more than twenty-five years, 
under the name of the Robert Aikin 
Company. 



J. T. HAMMILL WIDELY MOURNED 

Ottawa.— The body of the late J. T. 
Hammill, formerly president and general 
manager of the Murphy-Gamble Com- 
pany, Limited, whose tragic death in 
Galveston, Texas, was so deeply regret- 
ted by numerous friends and business 
acquaintances, reached Ottawa at 7.30 
Tuesday, December 21st, accompanied by 
his widow and the family physician, Dr. 
Robertson. Directors and employees of 
the firm, together with a delegation of 
Rotarians, and a few close friends, wait- 
ed the arrival and followed the remains 
to the house. 

On Wednesday, December 22nd, at 2.30 
p.m., the funeral was conducted, the 
body being borne to Beechwood Ceme- 
tery, and accompanied by a large num- 
ber of friends and admirers of the de- 
ceased. 

In the reorganization of the director- 
ate made necessary by this sad event, 
Mr. S. L. T. Morrell, merchandise man- 
ager, becomes president and managing 
director, while Mr. J. S. Virtue becomes 
vice-president. 

J. McCUBBIN DEAD 

The death occurred recently of James 
McCubbin at his residence, 173 St. Jo- 
seph Boulevard, Montreal. Mr. McCub- 
bin was well known amongst the whole- 
sale dry goods merchants of the city. 
He was latterly connected with the Har- 
old F. Watson Foster Co., Ltd., and was 
able to attend to his duties up to a few 
weeks ago. The sympathy of many 
friends will be extended to his bei'eaved 
family. 

OCCUPY ADDITIONAL SPACE 

Dobsons and M. Brown & Co., Ltd., 
report that they have a stand twice as 
large as that occupied by their firm at 
the British Industries Fair in Glasgow 
last year and that they also have double 
their former space at the Draperies 
Exhibition. 



2o;i 




»« 



The Newest in WAISTS for Spring 



Sterling Values 
Appealing Styles 
Popular Shades 



Georgettes 

Crepe de Chines 

Satins and Tricolettes 



See Samples in hands 

of our Travellers 

or write us. 



2 

I 
i 




KING FANCY WAIST CO. 

L. & R. BROWN 



117 King Street West 



Toronto 




— "> - 



rO L PC 



W$t #recntierg &mtti) Co. 

Sincerity pranb 



CLOAKS 



SUITS 



Our range of Cloaks and Suits is ready for Spring, 192 1. 
The "^tnceritp iBranb" line signifies all the name implies in 
STYLE WORKMANSHIP VALUE. 

Representatives are now showing on their respective territories. 

Daily Exhibit in Out Showrooms. 282 St. Catherine St. West, MONTREAL 



Highest Quality 




Wonderful Value 



338 ST. URBA1N ST. 



LADIES' GARMENTS 

We manufacture High-Class Tailored Dresses and 
Coats in the best Serges, Tricotines and Poiret Twill. 

SMITH & SAFIER CO. 



MONTREAL 



RETTIE & SMITH, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS 



LEADERS ONLY 



WAISTS 



CANADA'S MOST POPULAR WAIST HOUSE 




POPULAR PRICES ONLY 



WAISTS 



SAMPLES SENT ON REQUEST 



SPECIALISTS IN NEWEST VOILE AND WASH WAISTS 
233-239 BLEURY STREET, MONTREAL 



204 



READY-TO-WEAR 



Dry Goods Review 




Is Your Ready-to- Wear 
Department a Success ? 

If not, we can help you make it 
profitable. Retailers handling Art 
Garments are sure of adding more 
satisfied customers to their list. 
Make arrangements at once to 
HANDLE 

ART GARMENTS 
THAT SATISFY 

for Spring and Summer, 1921. 




— 




You are certain to get up-to-the-minute styles and great 
diversity of designs and colors as well as STERLING 
VALUE in our 

DRESSES and SKIRTS 

Last, but not least, our prices are right and we are ship- 
ping our goods "on time." 

If yau desire to win and hold trade of the better class, 
write us to-day and our travellers will call on you. 

For immediate delivery we have a first-class assortment. 



ART CLOAK & SUIT CO. 

LIMITED 

Wilder Bldg., 321 Bleury Street, MONTREAL 



REPRESENTATIVES: 



Toronto Showroom 

710 Kent Bldg. 

H. M. NASH 



Quebec Showroom 

Unmet Bldg.. Quebec 

R. DIONNE 



Eastern and Western Ontario, M. SCHWARTZ 



Western Provinces Maritime Provinces 

302 Hammond Bldg., Winnipeg B. R. ETTENBERG. J.t. 
W. J. COLLETT 

Montreal, C. ROSE 




Dr;/ Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



205 






The Trade Mark, of supreme 

excellence, embodying all 

that's best in 

Style -Quality— Value. 



HAPPY THOUGHTS 



in 



SPORT SKIRTS 



THE LAST WORD 



in 



CHARMING WAISTS 



These are our offerings for Spring. A more 
wonderful selection than we have assembled 
heretofore. 

These lines show a style appeal so un- 
mistakably fresh, so obviously new, as well as 
a quality and pattern elegance, that they are 
certain to provide an irresistible incentive to 
buy, for the class of trade you want. 

BLAND'S PRODUCTS have earned favor 
at the hands of all progressively conservative 
dealers. Are you included? 

W. C. Bland, Limited 

1 Cathcart Street 

Phillips Square, Montreal, Que. 




206 R K .\ DY-TO- W E A R Dry Goods Review 

| 



3$fSS m 



Y 



OUR CUSTOMER 
IS THE JUDGE! 



Canadian women are quick to re:ognize and appreciate styles they 
want to wear — and quality that is worth the money. In designing 
and producing women's 

DRESSES 

SKIR I S and 

WAISTS 

( olumbia manufacturers have kept this fact in mind. This has re- 
sulted in the production of garments in which dependability, value 
and stylish attractiveness are combined. 

In order that we may deliver orders promptly, we keep a stock 
always on hand made from the following fashionable materials in 
newest shades: 

SERGES TRICOTINES TRICOLETTES 
MESS A LINES SATINS s 

GEORGETTES and CHARMEUSES 

Our prices are such that dealers may place their orders with the 
utmost assurance of substantial and satisfactory profits, and still 
suit the pocketbook of even the careful and discriminating buyer. 

Before placing your Spring ord ?r see the samples our salesmen 
now showing. 

Columbia Waist & Dress Co. 

Manufacturers of Ladies* Ready-to-W ear 

50 St. Lawrence Blvd., Montreal 



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R E A I) Y-TO-W E A R 



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BEAUTY 
BLOOMERS 



"BEAUTY BLOOMERS" arc Knitted to fit 
and give comfort in all positions— -the de- 
sign is patented — the name registered — it 
cannot be duplicated. When a woman has 
worn these, she will always insist on having 
this make. Colors — Pink and White. Sizes 
— Misses, Ladies and O.S. or extra large 
size. 




No. O.O. Bloomer — Light weight hue 

balbriggan, price $ *.).00 

No. R.R. Bloomer — Medium weight, 

extra quality, price $16.50 



Remark The pleat is worn at the front of 
srarment emphasize this when selling same. 



Rush your order for Immediate or Spring' 
Delivery. Samples, display cards, etc., sent 
i;n request. 



Old 

Style 



The 
Beaut v 



THE CANADIAN UNDERSKIRT CO. 

Limited 

TORONTO 



9 6 SPADINA AVE. 
DARLING BUILDING 



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208 



READY-TO-WEAR 



Dry Goods Review 





SUITS AND COATS 

for Spring 

are now being displayed in our sales room. 

With confidence in the future and strict adher- 
ence to our established policy for style and 
quality, we have spared neither effort nor ex- 
pense in making our Spring line the finest we 
have ever developed. 

If you are interested in quality reasonably priced, do not fail 
to send for this season's catalogue. 

Full recognition was given to prevailing conditions on the 
market in figuring our prices for the Spring season, in order 
to maintain our reputation for values. 

LAZ ARE & NO VEK 

Corner St. Catherine W. and Mountain Sts. 

MONTREAL 



g^MH^Z^S: 



frocks 



for Misses and Juniors 

from "The House of Youth" 
in finer and larger range than ever 



Your youthful clientele will be 
enthusiastic over the Spring Styles 

The Counter Costume Co, 



Limited 



31 Spadina Ave. 
Toronto 



REPRESENTATIVES : 



Eastern Ontario 

Northern Ontario 

Western and Southern Ontario 

Western and Northern Ontario 

Toronto - 

Western Canada 

Maritime Provinces 



A. B. Colwell 

J. W. Counter 

R. Kennedy 

E. W. Wylie 

R. 0. Hargrave 

J. Howard 

W. A. Tallmire 



w&d^MsmR 




Dry Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



209 



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210 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



MYERSON BROS. 

Importers of 

SILKS, SATINS 

AND 

LININGS 

Of All Descriptions 

650 ST. LAWRENCE BOULEVARD 
MONTREAL 

BRANCH: 122 WELLINGTON ST. W_ TORONTO 



J. DUDGEON & CO. 

ManufacturerM' Agents and 
Commission Merchants 

NEW BIRKS BLDG., MONTREAL 

Canadian Agents for British Manu- 
facturers of the following to the Whole- 
sale and Manufacturing trade: 



Men's Tweeds and 
Serges 

Men's Overcoat- 
ings 

Linings 

Linen Canvas 

Dress Goods 

Mantle Cloths 

Children's Wash 
Dresses 



Boys' Wash Suits 
Lace Curtains 
Bungalow Nets 
Stripping Nets 
Vitrage Nets 
Madras Muslins 
Casement Curtains 
Linen Bed Spreads 
I'ancy Embroidered 
Linens 



Laces of all kinds 
Pleased to submit samples 



Make Your Price Tags 



on 



Standard 
Tag Machine 

Simple Quick Low Expense 
Particulars and Sample Tags Free 

R. WALLACE BURRY 

137 McGill St., Montreal 




BRAND 

(REG ) 

• DRESS FABRICS" 

F. A. RODDEN & CO. 

Dry Goods 

Commissioners and Importers 

52 Victoria Squire MONTREAL 



DOUBLE 



' MARKET 



French Prices Fall. 

Paris. — The November price index 
01 the Statistiques Generales de la 
Fiance, based on prices of 45 commo- 
dities, shows a fall of 74.7 points 
within two months. 

Pavis. — The Galeries Lafayette 
three-day sale of merchandise said to 
be worth 10,000,000 francs, offered at 
notable reductions, was disappointing' 
as an indication of any general clear- 
Mice policy. It was merely an ordin- 
ary Midwinter sale such as is now be- 
ing held at all stores. As yet, no- 
thing here approaches the retail sales 
of last Spring. 



British to Relieve Textile Unemployed 

Manchester. — J. S. Addison, chair- 
man of the board of trustees of the 
Cotton Control Board's surplus funds, 
amounting to £1,500,000, stated that 
the Board of Trad? has sanction- 
ed the scheme to disburse the funds 
lor the relief of unemployed cotton 
operatives. The first payment will 
be made on Jan. 15th. 

Beneficiaries must be totally unem- 
ployed, not receiving insurance or 
workmen's compensation and must 
not be working part time. Weekly 
relief will consist of 7s. 6d. for men, 
6s. for women, 3s. 9d. for boys under 
18, and 3s. for girls. 



Belgian Conditions Still Not Normal. 

Little industrial activity is report- 
ed at Brussels, and reports from other 
Belgian centres are equally discour- 
aging, although in some lines the 
utlook is less unfavorable. 

Women workers in Brussels are em- 
oloyed under favorable conditions, as, 
in spite of the abandonment of heavy 
lace, there is a greater demand for 
Cluny lace. 



Universal 
Hair Goods Company, 

Limited 

Converters, Manufacturers 

and Importers of Human 

Mp? Hair Goods and Hair Nets. 

DOLLS' WIGS 

We are the ORIGINAL Manufacturers 

of Real Human Hair and Mohair Dolls' 

Wigs in the Dominion 

Write for Quotations 

Fraser Bldg., 43 St. Sacrament Street, 
MONTREAL 





"Tis the Quality behind the name that counts" 

Popular Priced 

Clothes 

for MEN, YOUNG MEN 
and BOYS 

THE FREEDMAN CO. 

37 to 41 Mayor St. Montreal 



STUYVESANT 3619 

Art Button & Novelty 
Mfg. Company 

Manufacturers of 

JET AND FANCY 
GLASS BUTTONS 

FOR JOBBING TRADE ONLY 

Decorators on Buttons of Every Description 

814 BROADWAY NEW YORK 



Complete Lines at Keen Values in 

Underwear 

Shirts 

Ties 

Gloves 

Hosiery 

Miller Men's Wear Limited 

Miller Bldg. 

44-48 York St., - TORONTO 

"Everything in Men's Furnishings" 



Washable Clothing 

AND SPECIALTIES 

WHITE DUCK COATS in AH Styles 
SUMMER CLOTHING LUSTRE COATS 

WAREHOUSE and AUTO DUSTERS 

DUCK AND FLANNEL PANTS 

MEN'S APRONS 

OFFICIAL BOY SCOUT UNIFORMS AND 
COMPLETE OUTFITS 

MILITIA AND CADET UNIFORMS 
BREECHES AND MILITARY SUPPLIES 

The Miller Mfg. Co., Limited 

44-46 York Street. - TORONTO 

The Oldest and Largest Specialty 

Clothing House in Canada. 



I) K V GOODS K E V 1 K W 



21 I 




CLEAT & CO. 

Representing J. (). Bourcier 
SILKS, LININGS AND VELVETS 

flu- European Novelty Co! 
BUTTONS 

Byard Manufacturing Co. 
VEILINGS— HAIR NETS 



708 Builders' Exchange 
WINNIPEG 



MANUFACTURERS 

We especially desire the sell- 

' ing agency to cover the three 

Prairie Provinces for a line of 

Laces-VEILINGS and 
MILLINERY TRIMMINGS 

ETC. 

Write Uf 

The James B. Carter Co. 

Winnipeg : : Canada 



GEO,C5MITri 

>»trTtiiN-S«xsAti/a" 



Star Shirts 
Fownes Gloves 
Delpark 
Productions 
Liberty Blouses 
Clinton Hosieiy 
Kaynee Wash 

Tojs 
Boys' Shirts 
and Blouses 
Bradford Wools 
Wood, Taylor &. Co., Toronto. 
Lehman n Sales Co., Inc., New York, U.S.A. 
GEO. G. SMITH 
403 Canada Bldg., Winnipeg. 
Regina Vancouver Calgary N. Manitoba 

L. M. Day. H. S. Elliott. J. Bartle. J. A. Milne 
S. Manitoba, B. Irwin 




tor nryt womkn & c nn jirun 




Handkerchiefs, Cam- 
i s o 1 e s, Neckwear, 
Boudoir Caps, Baby 
Yokes, Spats, Accor- 
deon Pleating, Fancy 
Dry Goods and 
Smallwares, Veil- 
ings, Quick-on-Veils, Cap Shape 
Nets, Knitted Scarfs, Baby Bon- 
nets, Coats, Ribbons, Necklaces, 
Laces and Nets, Embroideries, 
Buttons, Beads, Braids and Tas- 
sels, Marcbou Trimming, etc., 
etc. 

We can give immediate delivery 

WESTERN VEILING COMPANY 

222 McDermot A»e. WINNIPEG 



PARAGRAPHS FROM PARIS 

Designers agree on the long, slim 
silhouette, the Moyen Age waist- 
line and the "uncorseted" effect. 

Certain Directoire influences are 
sponsored and the Spanish and 
Italian Renaissance styles are rep- 
resented. 

Short suit coats are important; 
collars are inconspicuous, and the 
curved line encouraged. 

Suit skirts are short and straight 
hung for the most part — scant ef- 
fects predominate and these hang 
from eight to twelve inches from 
the ground. The uneven hem is 
featured. 

The separate coat favors loose, 
straight lines with a preference 
for raglan or kimona sleeves. Belts 
are used on the blouse backed 
model", but models fitted at the 
waistline show darts and no belt. 

Tailored frocks cling to straight 
chemise lines and feature tunic 
effects, panels and very short 
sleeves. Combinations of mate- 
rials are very smart. 

Afternoon gowns are fashioned 
of crepe canton, crepe de Chine or 
georgette. The lace frock is very 
important. Flounced and panelled 
skirts encourage width and addi- 
tional length is also seen. 

The quaint, tightly-fitted bodice 
and the bouffant skirt characterize 
one type of evening gown. Long 
princess lines, gracefully draped 
fabrics and side train arrange- 
ments emphasize the other type 
sponsored. No sleeves are seen, 
but bodices are somewhat less dar- 
ing in cut. 

In colors for evening, light pas- 
tel tints dominate, notably mauve, 
yellow and turquoise. 

Black and black and white are 
leaders for afternoon frocks. Dark 
shades are preferred altogether 
for this type of gown. 

All soft shades of brown and 
grey — the dust and ashes shades 
— are prominently featured. 



Ready to wear firms are not doing 
a brilliant business, although several 
small establishments are working un- 
der more favorable conditions as re- 
gards cost prices. In corsets the sit 
uation has slightly improved. The 



W. J. COLLETT 

Manufacturers' Agent 

302 Hammond Bldg., 63 Albert St. 

WINNIPEG 

SPECIALS FOR SPRING 

Ladies' Suits ranging $22.50 to $40.00 
Ladies" Coats ranging $16.50 to $30.00 

Ladies' Silk and Serge Dresses, $12.50 

to $25.00. 
Ladies' Georgette and Crepe Waists, 

$4.50 to $6.50. 
Ladies' French Voile Waists, $2.25 to 

$•5.00. 



BRAIDS and TRIMMINGS 




MADE 

IN 

CANADA 

BY 



The MOULTON MFG. CO. Ltd. 

MONTREAL 

Representatives: 

CLEAT & CO. 

708 Builders' Exchange 
WINNIPEG 



fur industry is flourishing. At Ghent, 
he lingerie business is going through 
^ dead season. Work has slackened 
at Mons in every kind of business. 

In .art embroideries, unemployment 
tas become more serious at Bruges. 
The passementerie industry is devel- 
iping at Roisin and its surroundings. 
Work at home is popular. 



Markets in the U.S. 

Chicago. — Spirit of confidence 
grows stronger, with excellent results 
of first week of January sales. 

St. Louis. — Wholesale market re- 
ports spring buying season launche.l 
earlier than usual. Road orders in- 
crease. Retail trade overshadows 
last year's business. 

Cleveland. — Surplus stocks slashed 
in clearance events. Coat and suit 
trade exceptionally heavy. 

San Francisco. — Clearance and 
white sales meet with excellent re- 
sponse. 

Detroit. — Clearance offerings meet 
with sluggish response. Jobbing cir- 
cles more active. 



01 o 



21 



Wy Goods Revievr 



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1 BRITISH TRADE NEWS I 



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Trade Reports From London 

Dry Goods Review's British Representative Interviews Many 
Firms Carrying All Lines of Goods — Outlook Cheerful. 



IT will interest the wholesale and 
retail trade of Canada to know how 
things have worked out in Britain 
during the last few weeks of the year 
and especially in the busy days preced- 
ing Christmas. Everybody agrees that 
the first half year's trade was abnormal, 
and continuation of it could not be ex- 
pected under any circumstances. 

The information given below has been 
secured from responsible wholesalers 
and manufacturers who are hourly in 
touch with every section of England 
and Scotland. 

Dry Goods Review's London repre- 
sentative has interviewed members of 
both the wholesale and manufacturing 
branches in a number of lines, and the 
conditions found prevailing at the end 
of December are herewith set forth in 
a brief summary. 

A piecegoods house handling cotton 
voiles, ginghams, zephyrs, etc., reported 
that business at the end of the year 
was really bad. "Everyone seems to 
be waiting for something to turn up in 
the piece goods trade and it won't turn," 
was the report from this house. 

Houses handling fancy goods, hand- 
kerchiefs, scarfs, etc., have offered no 
complaints. Country orders were not 
large but repeats have been excellent 
and brought the total higher than had 
been expected. London West End or- 
ders were originally fair but repeats 
have been enormous. 

"The best Autumn buying since 1913, 
though policy has been hand-to-mouth," 
is the verdict of dealers in these lines. 

Dealers in needlework, fancy goods, 
buttons, etc., report that the Fall trade 
generally was not as satisfactory as 
the first half of the year, but that the 
fancy goods trade has been heavier than 
anticipated. The regular smallwares 
trade took a downward turn in October 
but is apparently picking up splendidly. 
On the whole the year has been satis- 
factory. 



An important London firm handling 
dress shields, steels and collar forms 
states that the last half of the year was 
not as good as the first six months. 
Stock orders placed for 1921 by four 
big London houses are, however, heavier 
than 1920 orders. These orders were 
placed in the second half of December. 

A prominent house handling veilings 
states business to be very satisfactory, 
especially is the demand strong for Eng- 
lish-made lines. "We are making every 
preparation for the continuance of good 
business in 1921," was the report given 
to Dry Goods Review. 

There has been a general falling off 
in business during the past three months 
as far as the firms handling women's 
and children's goods are concerned. Spe- 
cial lines such as jumpers, scarfs, etc., 
have sold well, however, and business in 
fancy lines has been very good. 

"A general change towards a modera- 
tion in styles is apparent and we are 
preparing for improvements in business 
early in the new year," is the opinion. 
"Bad times, except in cotton piece goods, 
are more talked of than real." 

Makers of handbags, leather novelty 
goods, silk and bead bags, report the 
best season's business since 1914. Mak- 
ers, wholesalers and retailers report 
alike. 



Will Make Goods 
For Canadian 

Trade Needs 

British manufacturers are seeking 
Canadian business in a variety of lines 
that have had no wide distribution in 
this country hitherto. Numerous repre- 
sentatives have been sent to investigate 
the possibilities of the Canadian mar- 
kets in their respective fields, and in 
several instances the impressions and 



results were so favorable that intensive 
exploitation of Canadian trade chances 
will be attempted. Particularly on lines 
in which the American manufacturers 
have gained a predominant position dur- 
ing the war, there will be aggressive 
action taken by Britishers to establish 
themselves and their wares, and there 
is no disposition to regard the strongly- 
entrenched position of such American 
houses as unassailable. 

One of the British manufacturers of 
women's coats and costumes has sent 
a representative to Canada who has re- 
cently completed a trip from coast to 
coast, and following a study of this mar- 
ket it has been decided to establish an 
office and warehouse in Toronto and to 
make similar provision in the West. 

Will Modify Styles 

The requirements of the Canadian 
trade have been essentially different 
from the models that find most favor 
from British buyers. The styles are 
somewhat different, and the fashions 
that have gained acceptance in New 
York and other garment-making cen- 
tres of the United States have been 
more or less faithfully copied. 

These points are recognized and ap- 
preciated by the British garment manu- 
facturers who propose to get a share 
of the Canadian business. They have 
expressed the intention of modifying 
styles to meet the preference of the 
consumer. It is interesting to note that 
the British houses are again out for the 
export business that was suddenly ter- 
minated in 1914, together with trade in 
new territory. In connection with ex- 
pansions of plant it is interesting to 
learn that Argyll House is now being 
used for a much different purpose than 
that with which Canadian officers were 
familiar during the war. It has been 
changed over and made suitable for the 
manufacture of women's garments. 

With regard to securing Canadian 
trade in coats and costumes, one British 
representative stated that the American 
manufacturers have found a profitable 
market in this country, and that an equal 
opportunity should exist for English 
makers if they went after the business 
in the right manner. 



CONDENSED ADVERTISEMENTS 



J.'OK RENT WE HAVE A VERY DESIRABLE STORE FOR RENT 
next door to our men's wear store, suitable for ladies' exclusive 
ready-to-wear. Apply to Bibby's Limited, 78, 80, 82 Princess St., King- 
ston, Ont. 



Y"OUNG MAN OF EXPERIENCE IN THE DRY GOODS TRADE 
open to represent Ontario manufacturers in Montreal and Quebec 
Province. Silks preferred. Highest references. Apply Box 94, Dry 
Goods Review, 128 Bleury Street, Montreal. 



TVjANUFACTURERS' AGENTS SELLING WHOLESALE DRY GOODS 
trade wish to obtain a standard Canadian line. Box 320, Dry 
Goods Review, 143 University Ave., Toronto, Ont. 



TiESPONSIBLE SALES ORGANIZATION OPEN TO REPRESENT 
reliable manufacturers and exporters in British Guiana, on a com- 
mission basis. All Canadian manufactures and products. Correspond- 
ence and samples with quotations invited. C. E. Gabriel, New Amster- 
dam, Berbice, British Guiana, S.A. 



Dry Goods Review 



213 



3J ililillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM Illllllllllllllll lilllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHWIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIMC 



WESTERN TRADE NEWS 



f. 



Kelly Sales System 

Stage Big Convention 

Minneapolis Scene of Two-Day Campaign 

For Better Sales— 1,000 Attend 

Banquet— Festive Finish 

Over five hundred sales conductors 
and other employees of the Kelly Sales 
System, of Minneapolis, attended the 
Better Sales Convention of that organ- 
ization, which was held on December 
27th and 28th, 1920. 

The sessions of the convention were 
conducted in the West Hotel, of Minnea- 
polis, and presided over by Mr. T. K. 
Kelly, who gave a characteristic opening 
address. 

"The merchant who says that these 
are hard times and that 'it can't be done' 
Is fooling himself. We are doing it," 
said Mr. Kelly, who sounded a fine note 
of optimism and enthusiasm, which was 
maintained throughout the entire con- 
vention. 

H. E. Dever took up in detail the sub- 
ject of clothing and clothing sales, while 
a similar discussion was conducted on 
the shoe and leather goods trade by W. 
C La Grave. 

An analysis of the talks made at the 
convention indicated that about the only 
retail values which have not declined re- 
markably in the last few months were 
those applying to the furniture and hard- 
ware trade. 

About sixty speakers, all experts in 
their line, addressed the convention. 

Almost the entire hotel, which was 
beadquarters for this convention, was 
given over to the delegates and their 
■wives and friends. 

The evening of the convention was 
marked by a banquet attended by fully 
one thousand people, given to the sales 
conductors, the office staff and their 
friends and families, by Mr. Kelly, and 
followed by a ball. The second evening, 
however, proved to be much more of an 
attraction than the first, because, in ad- 
dition to the banquet and ball program, 
a special program made up of singers, 
dancers and comedians, from the Min- 
neapolis theatre, was also tendered. The 
final ball also was converted into a mardi 
gras festival, with all the noise makers, 
carnival hats, confetti and frolics which 
attend such an occasion. 



VISITORS IN TORONTO 

M. and Mme. C. Moutarde arrived 
from their home at Lyons, France, in. 
Toronto, on January 3, and remained for 
a few days at the Queen's. M. Moutarde 
is one of the foremost commercial men 
of the French republic and a leader in 
the silk trade of the world. He is here 
partly on business of his company, C. 
Moutarde et Cie, which has Canadian 
headquarters at 80 Wellington St. west. 



Millinery Trade 

Officers Chosen 



prised nearly the entire wholesale mil- 
linery business of the city, and was pro- 
gressing well both financially and as re- 
garded work to stabilize the business in 
Montreal. The retiring officers, who 
had been appointed provisionally on the 
organization of the association, reported 
that while prospects for the business 
were somewhat unsettled they felt con- 
fident that the existence of the organ- 
ization would have a good effect during 
the coming season. 

There had been some talk of extending 
the association into a Dominion organ- 
ization, but this matter was not dealt 
with, owing to unsettled conditions. 



Jno. Belisle is President of Montreal 
Wholesale Association 

A complete new slate of officers, with 
the exception of the treasurer, was elect- 
ed -at the first annual meeting of the 
Wholesale Millinery Association, in con- 
nection with the Board of Trade, at the 
recent meeting held in the committee 
room of the Montreal Board of Trade. 
Following are the officers elected: presi- 
dent, J. W. Belisle; first vice-president, 
E. J. Orkin; second vice-president, H. J. 
Lelievre; treasurer, S. H. Ivey; directors, 
C. Warshaw, D. F. Christian, J. A. Barry 
and L. Leone, jr.; secretary H. E. Beatty. 

The Wholesale Millinery Association 
was only organized last May, but the re- 
ports presented showed that it now com- 



BRITISH FIRM IN SARNIA? 

Still another industry is considering 
Sarnia as a suitable location for the 
establishment of a branch plant. A 
representative of an English wood silk 
and other pulp products company was 
in the city recently investigating the 
possibilities of this city, and although 
any definite decision as to the establish- 
ment of a Canadian branch is held in 
abeyance pending an improvement in 
business conditions, it is intimated that 
the choice for a plant site rests between 
Sarnia and another Ontario city, with 
Sarnia holding the advantage, due to 
facilities offered for securing an ample 
supply of water required in the process. 




A Big Western Enterprise 

The handsome four-storey building in which the Regina Trading Company, of 
Regina, serve the needs of a wide Western patronage. This big departmental store 
has recently made important extensions. 



2 1 4 



l> R V G 00 DS RE Y J E W 



►e 




The Thompson Lace & Veiling Co., Limited 

Laeea. Veilings. Geor- 
gettes. Ninons. "My 
Lady" Silk Hair Nets. 
Prfticess Pat Human 
Hair ' Nets. Sport 
Veils. 

Cor. Wellington and 

York Sts.. 

Toronto. Canada. 




Real HARRIS, LEWIS and 
SHETLAND HOMESPUNS 

Direct from the makers. Special light- 
weights for Ladies' wear — all shades. 
Patterns and Prices on Application. 

S. A. NEWALL & SONS, Stornoway, Scotland 

Slate ahade daited and whether for Lad la' or Genii' 



Infants', Children's, Girls' 
and Misses' Dresses 

We are Specialists in these lines 

H. L. WATTS, LIMITED 

400 Richmond St.W., Toronto 



w M : 



T. H. Birmingham & Co. 

LIMITED 
to 99 apadina Ave., TORONTO 

Maker* of 

Women's High Grade 
Neckwear 

" The Exclusive Neckwear House" 

"EVERYTHING IN SILKS" 

M. Ascher Silk Corp. 

Distributors—Iroquois Silk Mills 
102 Madison Avenue, New York 



Sho-cards will Clear 

Your left-over stock 

Send order to 

G. L. Wooding 



P.O. Box 62 



Salmon Arm, B.C 



SILKS 



I n | 

\f;iM>S|BtllitTS Ol 



iy some of the 
iters of I 
ram 



J. H. GAGNON 

108 Dandurand BIdg. Montreal 



GERSTENZANG BROS. 

Popular Priced 
Flowers and Feathers 

670-674 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY 



ITALIAN TEXTILE MEN MERGE 

The Italian Federation of Whole- 
sale Textile Notion and Yarn Mer- 
chants 'was recently organized at 
Rome with a view to safeguarding 
the interests of the national economic 
life. Nearly all the wholesale asso- 
ciations in Italy are represented in 
the new bodv. 



PLAN SAMPLE FAIR FOR NAPLES 

The Chamber of Commerce of Na- 
ples is planning to organize an an- 
nual sample fair on the model of the 
Lyons fair, says La Journee Indus- 
trielle. It is believed .that in view of 
the recent development in the indus- 
try of the region, a success similar 
to that of Milan and Trieste may be 
expected. 



London. — The re-establishment of 
British commercial stability is b?ing 
undertaken by a mission headed by 
Sir Charles Sykes and six representa- 
tives of British industries, acting as 
an independent body of business men 
which has proceeded to Denmark, and 
which can offer, it is said, £10,000,000 
worth of goods, comprising woolens, 
hosiery, bolts, etc., to any continental 
group. 

The mission's scheme is to take a 
small percentage in cash and the re- 
mainder on a barter basis. Shipping 
facilities have already been arranged 
to extend trading to all countries, it 
is claimed. 



The British press is unanimous in 
approving the scheme presented by 
Sir Edward Mountain, chairman of 
the Eagle Star & British Dominion 
Insurance Company, for the formation 
of a syndicate, backed by the Govern- 
ment, banks and insurance companies 



Half Ball 



Full Ball 



No. 14 




You can make these button... while 
your customer waits. Their own cr 
your material. Sixty years'experience behind our service_ 

SCORES OF ATTRACTIVE 
COVERED BUTTONS 

Made easily, economically 
and profitably with 

Menkin Equipments 

Send for particulars 

S. MENKIN, INC. 

143 W. 28th St., New York 




Kent-McClain Again 

Special fixtures for samples and special mer- 
chandise save wear and tear and add bo Bales 
— Mr. E. s. Edwarcla has demonstrated this 

in his sample rooms in the MrKinmm Build- 
in;,'. Toronto, where on two different occasions 

i. ilv Kent-McClain Limited, (Toronto 

Show Case Company), have been ''■.illed on to 
inshi] these special cabinets. 



FOR HONEST VALUE AND 
SATISFACTION 

CROWN PANTS 

Will increase your sales. Our production 
has increased 60% over former years. 

CROWN PANTS 



322 Notre Dame West, 



MONTREAL 



EVERLAST 
OILCLOTH BINDING 

A heavy gauge, double bevelled solid 
brass binding as used in office build- 
ings where permanency is so essential. 
$11.85 per hundred yds. Retails at 18 
cts. Order now for spring delivery, to 
complete your oilcloth deot. stock. THE 
METAL WEATHERSTRIP CO.. Ottawa. 




Canada's 

Largest Makers of 

Cotton Flags 



Wrire for Price* 



THE COPP, CLARK CO. 

517 Wellington St. West Toronto 




"HOOSIER" 

The best 36-inch brown 
domestic in America 

Buy it by the bale; 
Bell it by the bolt 

Indiana Cotton Mills 
Cannelton, I nd.,U.S. A. 



LARGEST MANUFACTURERS 

Artificial Flowers, Plants and Vines. 
Window Decorations, Japanese and 
Chinese Decorations, Papier Mache 
Novelties, Electric Lighted Flower 
BusJhes. Write for our Catalogue. It's 
free for the asking. 

The Botanical Decorating Company 

(Incorporated) 

208 W. Adams St., Chicago, III. 



Save time - Buy right 

Use 1921 
Fraser's Textile Products Directory 

A complete key to the Canadian Market. 
Write or call for approval copy. 

i? n LI: l- r 222 Craig W., Montreal 

Fraser Publishing Lo. 122 Wellington W., Toronto 



Bartell Patent Pockets 

Used and Endorsed by 59 
Canadian Clothing Manu- 
facturers. This List can be 
had from 

BARTELL PATENT POCKET CO. 

117 East 34th St., N.Y.C. 



I) i; v (i oo ds REVIEW 



21. 




I Specialize in Boot Laces 

for the wholesale trade in the better 

grade*. 

Banded in pairs, in gross boxes 

Fancy Cabinets. 100 pairs, banded in 

pairs. These are more profitable than 

bulk make-up. Also 

' FATHFR I.ACFS. all kind*. 

E. W. McMARTIN, MONTREAL 



VEILINGS and 
SILK NETS 



HODGES & 

232 McGill St. 



LETTAU 

Montreal 



Agencies wanted for Great Britain 
L. A. NELSON 
Hosiery & Knitted Goods 

Agent, Wholesale and Export. 
Headquarters, London, England. 
59. Gresham St.. E.C. 2. 
Open to represent manufacturers, all 
classes except Summer Ribbed Under- 
wear. 



RIBBONS OP DISTINCTION 

".l-c" Hil>l>oiis have peculiar 
unarm. Widely advertised to 
i lie consumer under their 
trade-mark names for the 
protection of the dealer. 
"SATIN DK LIjXB" 
•TROUSSEAD" 
"LADT FAIR" 
••8AXKANAP" "Vmucr- 
"I>EMOORAOT" 
JOHNSON. COW© IN * CO., 40 E. 80th St. 
New York. N.Y. Made In U.S.A. 




Cotton Comforters 

Down Comforters 

Deliveries Guaranteed 

The Toronto Feather & Down Co., Ltd. 

2154-56-58 Dun das St. W., Toronto 



B LAN K E T S 

PRIESTLEY BROTHERS 

Blanket Manufacturers 
GROVE MILLS HALIFAX 

Telegrams and Cables, "Blankets" Halifax 
Codes, A. B.C. 5th, and Bentley's 



JUTE GOODS 

WHY NOT BUY DIRECT FROM THE 
MANUFACTURERS. 

James Brodie Representing 

COXBROTHERSLP 

12 BANK OF OTTAWA BLG., MONTREAL 



WILL P. WHITE, LIMITED 



Montreal 
137 McGill Street 



Head Office : 

Toronto 
65 Sirmoe St. 

Manufacturers' Agents and Distributors 
Textile and Smallwares Specialities. 
Wholesale and Manufacturers Only Supplied. 



to support the credit of British mer- 
chants in foreign trade. 

Bankers and financiers regard it as 
the only safe and sound plan which 
could be worked economically. It is 
estimated that if the scheme is suc- 
cessful it will ultimately extend to a 
capital sum approaching £100,000,000. 



Bradford, Eng. — Leading organiza- 
tions of manufacturers and mer- 
chants engaged in the piece goods 
trade are actively supporting the pro- 
posal to form a company, to be known 
as the British Woolen Trades Export 
Corporation, with the object of tak- 
ing advantage of the credit and other 
facilities provided under the Govern- 
ment's export credit scheme, also to 
find an outlet abroad for surplus 
stocks of piece goods. The plan is 
to have the shares held equally by 
merchants and manufacturers. 

The draft of the scheme as pre- 
pared by the Federation of Woolen 
Merchants and Shippers of Great 
Britain and Ireland is now being con- 
sidered by the Woolen and Worsted 
Trades Federation, an influential body 
of manufacturers and spinners. 

When the company is formed it is 
proposed to invite members of the 
trade associations concerned to send 
particulars and samples of any lines 
of surplus stock available. It is then 
proposed that those supplying such 
samples be asked to grant the com- 
pany an option, on specified lines at 
specified prices and the company will 
endeavor to negotiate sales and ar- 
range payments by means of the Gov- 
ernment's export credit scheme or 
through special arrangements with 
foreign governments, or through 
financial houses. 

It is not the intention to make 
profits for the company, the main ob- 
ject being to find markets abroad, 
arrange payments or credits, and re- 
lieve the home market. 

It is believed that the scheme has 
every prospect of going through. 

MESH BAGS in Silver and Gun Metal 
Finish. METAL FRAMES for Ladies' 
Hand Bags. 

Made in Canada for the Canadian Trade 

WHITING & DAVIS CO. 

SHERBROOKE. QUE. 



Kent-McClain Again 

Messrs. Mac & Mac. of Reifina, Sask.. 
have added Kreatly to the attractive- 
ness of tfhair store by the installation of 
new silent salesmen. These cases are 
in rich quarter-cut fumed Oak and were 
supplied by Kent-McClain. Limited TTo- 
ronto Show Case Company). 



H. Levy & Sons, Limited 

1*8 McGill Street • MONTREAL 

Phone MAIN 1457 

Woollens, Linings, Trimmings, etc. 

For Clothing and Cloak Trades 




CHILDREN'S 

GARMENT 

DRYING FORMS 

non-rusting 

patented 

Write for Circular 
No. 31 

, J. B. TIMBERLAKE 
• SONS, Mb,. 
JaeksM Michigan 




MCRCH ANDliT E 



D B. Fisk&Co. 



Chicago 

New York Salesroom : 

Open Throughout the Year 

411 Fifth Avenue 



ADVERTISEMENT WRITERS and 
SHOW CARD WRITERS WANTED 

Big demand for both men and women. 
We prepare you in few months at home 
— under experts. Our graduates in 
demand. They earn good money. Get 
particulars. Write 

SHAW CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL 

Toronto, Canada (Dep. D.RJ 



•Smallwares 

— -AND 

Hosiery 

The Robert Hyslop Cq u*-!hp 

HAMILTON. ONTARIO 



Manufacturers 
329-331 Fourth Ave., N. Y. 

SUPERBA BINDING 
BRAIDS, CORDS, DRESS TRIMMINGS 



Fred Jones & Company 

Manufacturers and Importers 

Babies' Hand Crochet Goods Notions 

Babies' Hand Knit Goods Novelties 

Art Needlework Materials 

Room 712, Empire Building 

64 WELLINGTON ST. WEST, TORONTO 



216 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




Choir Gowns 

The Best in Design 

The Best Made 

The Most Reasonable in Price 

HARCOURT & SON, LIMITED 

103 King Street W., Toronto 




CLIMAX PAPER 
BALERS 

ALL STEEL-FIREPROOF 

"Turn* Waatm 

Into Pro/it" 
12 SIZES 
Sand for Catalog 

CLIMAX BALER CO 
Hamilton, Ont. 



STERLING DRESS CO. 

Popular-Priced Ladies' and Misses' 

DRESSES and SKIRTS 
220 KING ST. WEST - TORONTO 

ADELAIDE 38S7 




JOSEPH G. HAWA & CO. 

367 St. Catherine St. W., Montreal 



Imerican Bead Co. inc. 

(POaTErV. AND «»MJFACTUflCR. ©* 

DEADS AND NECKLACES 

495 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YOnK. CITY 



COTTON PANT1NGS AND SUITINGS 

for Manufacturers only 

GANSEMAN & DeMYTTENAERE 

MOUSERON BELGIUM 
MAKERS OP LEADING LINES 

G. C. EGAN CO., LIMITED 

18 St. Helen St., - MONTREAL 

Sole Canadian Representatives. 



PENNANTS PILLOW-TOPS 

and 

CHAIR-PADS 

MADE BY 
Canadian Manufacturing of Novelty 



49-51 Boucher St. 



MONTREAL 



J. CHANANIE 

Wholetale Dry Good* Importer 
has removed to larger and more central premise! at 

323 NOTRE DAME ST. WEST 

MONTREAL 

where He will render still more efficient service than 
in the patt 



London. — ■ Woolen merchants of 
Great Britain are heartily supporting 
the formation of a British woolen 
trade export corporation. Plans are 
being discussed to put the capital 
stock out in one shilling shares. 

According to this shilling-share 
plan, merchants are individually ex- 
pected to subscribe £100, while manu- 
facturers will be asked to subscribe 
for the shares in proportion to £1 per 
loom to a maximum of £100. 

A committee of the proposed Brit- 
ish woolen trade export corporation 
will fix selling prices on a fair re- 
placement value of cloth stocks, but 
owners can withdraw their material 
if the prices are not approved. 

The corporation will appoint repre- 
sentatives in European markets who 
are expected to take full advantage 
of the Government's export credit 
scheme, which has a fund of £26,- 
000,000. 

Control of the corporation is vested 
in a council of six merchants, six 
manufacturers and four co-operative 
members. 

The organization will terminate six 
months after the Government's ex- 
port credit scheme ceases to function. 
Central offices for the organization 
have already been taken in London. 



Swiss Sample Fair in Basle, April 16. 

The fifth Swiss sample fair will 
take place at Basle, its permanently 
alloted domicile, between April 16th 
and 26th, it was announced from the 
Swiss Information Bureau recently. 
The chief object of this exhibition is 
to stimulate existing business rela- 
tions; to afford opportunities for the 
making of new connections and to 
give the public in general a better 
idea of the nature, extent and pro- 
gress of home manufacture. 

Only Swiss firms and products 
manufactured in Switzerland are eli- 
gible for this Fair. In case of cor- 
porations the majority of the manage- 
ment and at least half of the capital 
must be of Swiss origin and their 
chief seat must be located in Swit- 
zerland. 



TAPES 

ALL WIDTHS AND QUALITIES 
CARRIED IN STOCK 

Walter Williams & Co. 

508 READ BLDG., MONTREAL 
20 WELLINGTON ST. W., TORONTO 



Red Seal Zephqr Ginghams 

Evererr Classics 
Eden Clorh - Blue Bell Cheviofs 
Standard Woven Corro.i Fabrics 



SMITH. HOGG &COMPANY 

115-117 WORTH STREET- NEW YORK 



Boston- 144 Essex St. Chicago-226 West Adams St- 



DIRECTORIES 

Of all Canadian Trades. 
All branches of the Dry Goods Trade covered by 
WOMEN'S WEAR, JULY; MEN'S WEAR. 
SEPT.; TEXTILE PRODUCTS, JAN., com- 
bining above two. 

n i» ■ •• l- n 222-Craig VK, Montreal, 

rraser Publishing Lo. 122 Wellington . ff. , Toronto. 




BALLOONS 

Printed with >uur ad- 
vertisement at small 
cost. Brines the 

mothers and children. 
L. G. BEEBE 
28 Wellington St. 
E.. Toronto 



MILLINERS! 

GIVE US A CALL! 

We specialize in 

MILLINERY ACCESSORIES, 
HATS, NOVELTIES, 
FANCY FEATHERS 

and ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS. 

Compare our values with 
others and mark the con- 
trast. A high standard of 
excellence, both in quality 
and workmanship, has 
ever distinguished our 
products. It pays to sell 
the BEST, that is 
LEONE'S. 

Samples submitted on re- 
quest. Prompt, efficient 
service. 

JOS. LEONE & CO. 

Wholesale Milliners 
17 ST. HELEN ST. - MONTREAL 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 

1921 TEXTILE PRODUCTS DIRECTORY NOW READY. 

A complete Buying and Selling Guide, a time saver for Street Address and Telephone. 

An approval copy sent on request. 



217 



FRASER'S 



Classified 

GENERAL DRY GOODS 

DIRECTORIES 



Three Separate Books 



From 1914 to 1916, Women's Wear and Men's Wear were each published twice a year for the Spring 
and Fall Seasons. In 1916 to improve the service we combined the Spring issues of each book, to 
form Textile Products Directory, large page size. 



FRASER'S WOMEN'S WEAR DIRECTORY 



Pocket size, each July — 430 pages. 



FRASER'S MEN'S WEAR DIRECTORY 

Pocket size, each September — 300 pages. 



FRASER'S 
TEXTILE PRODUCTS DIRECTORY 

A Combination of Women's Wear and Men's Wear. 

Large page size, each January — 350 pages. 



CONTENTS: 

Every Canadian Manufacturer, Wholesaler, Agent, Retailer and 

Firm outside of Canada represented in Canada is listed without 

charge. 

Women's Wear Directory. — Covers every branch of the Dry Goods, 

Garment, Furs, and allied lines, (Dry goods retailers and garment 
stores list in this book only.) 

Men's Wear Directory. — Covers every branch of the Clothing, Fur- 
nishings, Hats, and allied lines. (Men's wear retail stores list in this 
book only.) 

Textile Products. — Covers the combined lists of Women's Wear and 
Men's Wear, corrected to date. In addition also department stores 
list with names of all buyers, and all Clothing, Garment, and Textile 
manufacturers are grouped in three lists, with full particulars. 
Subscription Price— $2.00 TEXTILE PRODUCTS; $1.00 Each WOMEN'S WEAR 

and MEN'S WEAR. (In Canada $2.00. Subscription entitles the subscriber to 

the three books if desired.) 
Advertising rates, including subscription, $75.00 page in TEXTILE PRODUCTS — 

$40.00 each, in Women's Wear and Men's Wear Directories. 



FRASER PUBLISHING CO. 

Publishers of SIX specialized Canadian tradelDirectories . 

Head Office: 222 Craig Street West, MONTREAL. - Tel. Main 5196 

Branch Office: 122 Wellington West. TORONTO. - Tel. Adel. 1030 

Write for an Approval Copy. 

mm 



2 IS 



DRY GOODS REV] l£ W 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



A 

Abt rdeen Glove Co t;2 

Allen Bros, and Allen Silk Mills. 82, 3 

American Waist & Dress Co 209 

American Head Co 215 

Anderson & Co.. Wm 50 

Anderson. Peter ' 70 

Art Cloak & Suit Co 201 

Art Button & Novelty 210 

Art Toy Mfg. Co ho 

Aseher Silk Co.. M 211 

Atlantic Underwear Ltd 12(> 

B 

Baker & Co.. Richard L 17 IS 

Bastard. J. & W '3s 

Bastin. Merry-field & Cracknell, Ltd. . . 66 

Ballantyne & Co., R. M 124, 125 

Bates & Innes 130 

Barry & Co.. W. H H;> 

Belding Corticelli Ltd Back cover 

Beebe. L. G 216 

Bertel Patent Pocket 211 

Biltmore Curtain Co 193 

Bishinsky Bros , . . . . 201 

Birmingham & Co., T. H 214 

Bland Ltd.. W. G 205 

Bourcier Ltd.. J. 23 

Botanical Decorating Co 214 

Bradford Dyers' Association 47 

Bradstreets Ltd 7t; 

Brettle & Co., Geo 39 

Britton & Sons, C. H 67 

Brock Co., W. R. (Montreal) 74. 75 

Brock Co.. W. R. (Toronto) 77 

Blumenthal & Co.. Sidney 104 

Burritt & Co.. A 126, 127 

Burry, R. Wallace 210 

Butterfly Hosiery Co., Li 165, 166 

C 

Calico Printers' Association 46 

Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co 

Inside back cover 

• Canadian Perfect Garment 163 

Canada Veiling Company 24 

Campbell, Metzger & Jaobson 13°. 

Canham Co., Victor H 179 

Canadian Converters Co 25 

, Canadian Underskirt Co 207 

Canadian Manufacturers of Novelties. 216 

Carr & Sons. Ltd.. James 60 

Carter & Co.. Jas. B 211 

Castle Braid Company 215 

1 Chananie. J 216 

. Chipman. Holton Knitting Co 123 

; Cleat & Co 211 

Climax Baler Co 216 

Clift & Goodrich. Ir.c 122 

Circle Bar Knitting Co 136 

Collett. W. J 211 

Columbia Waist & Dress Co 206 

Colonial Fastener Co 15 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 176 

Counter Costume Co 208 

Cox Bio- 215 

Copp, Clark Co 214 

■ ana 64 

O-tx Carpet Mfg. I 1 181 

man Bios ,- ( jj 

Crocker.- Ltd 35 

1, Pants Co 211 

Cumming. D. H 201 

:> 

Dale Wax Figure 177 

190, l'H 

& Co., Hem 137 

port, I' 

D 57 

Delfo- ■ & ( 176 

Dent. All. 146 

De Long Hook & Eye ''•> 162 

neay & Co 1 07 

on &■ M. Brown Co 61 



Dom inii Feather II- 



Dominion Waddii I 12 

Dugeon & Co.. D 2 ! 

E 

215 

. Engiisl Velvet & ' 
European Novelty Co 163 



F 

Fa£re Brothei 86 

Faudels Ltd 64 

Federated Leather Goods C. 11s 

Ferstrong yj 

I'isk & Co.. 1). B ! 215 

Foster & Co.. Joseph 52 

Frank Leopold 210 

Fraser Publishing 217 

Frasers' Directories 214, 216 

Freedman & Co 2 10 

Frank & Brvce. td 10J 

G 

Garland. Son & Co.. John M 3 

Gage Bros. & Co 117 

Gagnon, J. H 214 

Gertenzenjg Bros 214 

Gipe-Hazard Store Service 178 

Godde. Bedin & Co., Albert 105 

G^derich Knit;.: g Co., Ltd 137 

Gvssi'rd & Co c. ■. H. W 155 

G^u'ding & C .. G 116 

Gtvenberg Smith Co. The 203 

Gr.enshie'.ds Ltd 1, 32, 94, 162 

H 

Hadfield & Co.. Robt 56 

Harvey Knitting Co 133 

Harcourt & Sons. Ltd 216 

Hambly & Wilson 163 

Haslan6 Ltd 71 

Haworth & Co.. Rieh-rtl Front cover 

Hawthorn Mills Ltd 22 

Haugh Mfg. Co.. J. A 29 

Hawa & Co., Joseph G 216 

Hees, Geo. H iss 

Henderson & Co.. J. B 192 

Hitchcock, Williams & Co 73 

Hodges & Lettau 215 

Hodgson, Sumner & Co 14 

Hoover Suction Sweeper 7 

Hollins & Co.. Ltd.. Wm 139 

Horrockses. Cr;wdson & Co 62 

Hyslop Co.. Rpbt 215 

I 

Ideal Dress Co 201 

Independent Silk Ltd 106 

Indiana Cotton Mills 214 

Infant's Footwear Ltd 62 

International Trades Exhibition .... 48 
Irish Linen Society 10, 11 

J 

Jamieson & Co.. Alexander 180 

Jauffred & Gitriel 61 

Jennens. Welch & Co 72 

Jerseys Ltd • 128 

John. J. W 201 

Johnston, Cowdin & Co 215 

Jones & Co.. Fred 215 

Jones Bros. & Co !7l 

Julian Sales Leather Goods Ill 

K 

Kelly Sales System. T. K 19 

Kent-McClain Ltd 8,9,214.215 

King Silk Co.. A. S 2 

Kenvon Co., Inc., C Inside front cover 

King & Co.. John 70 

Kidmar Hosier) Co. 59 

King Fancj Waisl <' > 203 

K> ;-hi. T, K 51 

L 

La Mode Dress Co 201 

Ladies Wear Ltd 26, 27 

Lamstm Co 167 

1 : are & Novek 20s 

Lemaistre, P. M 201 

Leone & Co.. Jos 21ii 

Levy & Sot;.-. Ltd., H KX6 

£ ' 49 

, & Co., William \ 148 

M 

1'. P.' 13 

Menkin [nc . s 214 

McElroy Mfg. Co 201 

Meroha nl rvice 20 

Metal Weatherstrip Co 211 

McMartin & Co.. A. W 215 



Miller Mfg. Co 210 

Miller Men's Wear Lid 210 

Ministry of Munitions 37 

Mclntyre Sons & Co.. Ltd 21 

McGregor & Co.. J. C 59 

Monoker Dress Mfg. Co. ; 201 

Montreal Waterproof Co.'" 31 

Morten & Co., Robert 64 

Mortin, Sundours Ltd 5 

Moulton Mfg. Co., Ltd 149. 211 

Mouterde. Chas 28 

Moyer, Walter W 28 

Muser Bros. & Co 6 

Myerson Br.is 210 

N 

National Cash Reg. Co 175 

Nelson, L. A 215 

Newall Mfg. Co., S. A 214 

North American Dye Corp 12 

O 

Old Beach Linen Co 16 

Ontario Button Co 139 

Oxford Mfg. Co 76 

Oxford Knitting Co. . , 129 

P 

Palmnbcrgs Sons. Inc., J. R 179 

Parsons & Parsons Can. Co 137 

Pawsons & Leafs 58 

Perrott. W. K 54 

Perrin. Kayser Co 31 

Philips & Co., Ltd., J. N 40, 41 

Phoenix Novelry Co 147 

Prime & Rankin Ltd 1*9 

Priestley Bros 215 

Pugh Specialty Co 157 

R 

Racine, Alphonse 4 

Rawlinson Ltd., Rowland 59 

Reid & Co., C. F 107 

Rettie & Smith Ltd 203 

Rigg Bros 44, 45 

Ritchie & Co., John E 139 

Ritchie & Co., H. P 31, 30 

Rodden. F. A 210 

S 

Sands & Graham 76 

Scott Bros. & Co 69 

Scott & Co., Peter 43 

S. & D. Dress Co 201 

Shaw Correspondence School 215 

Smith. Hogg & Co 216 

Smith. Geo 211 

Smitl & Safier Co 203 

Stedall Ltd.. A 65 

Sterling Dress Co. 215 

Stevens (Coventry) Ltd., Thomas .... 61 

Stiby, Robt. M 63 

Timberlake & Sons. J. L 215 

Thompson Lace & Veiling 214 

Toronto F'eather & Down Co 215 

Turnbull & Co 135 

U 

Universal Hair Goods 210 

Universal Knitting Co., Ltd 136 

Victoria Rubber Co 201 

Visor Knitting Co 122 

Voss & Stern 106 

W 

Walker Bin & Store Fixture 17- 

Warner Bios 15 1 

Watts. H. L 214 

Westlake Bros.. Ltd 21. 

Western Veiling Co 211 

Wi stern Leather Goods Co., Ltd 149 

Weyerstall & Co . A 157 

Williams & Co., Walter 72, [93, 216 

William; Trow Knilting Co 184 

Wild & Co., H. L 55 

Wilson & Co ' 60 

White Ltd.. P 215 

Wooding 214 

Wright & Sons, Wm. E 163 



1) K V <; OO DS RE V I E W 



Dominion Raynsters 



t i 



Made-in- Canada ' Raincoats 




"DOMINION RAYNSTERS" 
are made for men, women 
and children. They come in 
many different styles and 
materials suitable for every 
occasion. 



Think of Spring 



Almost before you realize 
it, Spring will be here and 
your customers will be 
asking for "Dominion 
Raynsters." 

Have you seen the new 
Spring styles? Have you 
placed your "Dominion 
Raynster" orders ? 

If not, write our nearest 
branch to let you see what 
"Dominion Raynsters" 
have to offer in the way 
of styles and values. 

"Dominion Raynsters" are 
the everyday, rain-and-shine 
coats. They are absolutely 
waterproof, yet, in appear- 
ance, are like the expensively 
tailored Spring and Fall 
coats. 

Being Dominion Rubber 
System products, you can sell 
them with every confidence 
in their sterling quality and 
in the service they will give. 

The "Dominion Raynster" 
label goes in every coat to 
protect you and assure satis- 
faction to your customers. 

Write to the nearest service branch 




JOMlNlOtf 

RUBBER »' 



Dominion Rubber System Service Branches 

are located at 
Halifax, St. John, Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, Brant- 
ford, Kitchener, London, North Bay, Fort William, Winnipeg, Brandon, 
R°gina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Lethbridge, Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria. 




ni;y coons REVIEW 



Stamped Articles 
for Embroidering 

Latest [styles and ideas 
in Lingerie, Children's 
Dresses and a great 
variety of dainty and 
useful articles. 

Montreal Toronto | Winnipeg Vancouver 







NEEDLECRAFT 

Tfie Product makes theJlrt possible 







^Jf ^^ 






Hry Q oods R eview 



Volume XXXIII 



Publication Office: Toronto, February, 1921 



Number 2 



The W. R. Brock Company 



(LIMITED) 




Reco//e^% 



Warehouses 

TORONTO MONTREAL CALGARY 

Offices and Sample Rooms 

Sydney Ottawa Winnipeg 

Halifax London Edmonton 

Quebec Hamilton Vancouver 

London, Eng. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



tosf* 



Suits Tailleur, Polo Coats 
Velveteen Jackets 



PERHAPS you have been thinking 
of "Kenyon" as the company that 
have made such a success of good-look- 
ing Ken reign weatherp roofs and water- 
proofs. 

That's right, and we are making more 
good-looking models every season. 
But we don't stop there. (Look at this 
illustration and you'll be convinced of 
that. ) For every one of these models as 
well as many others with quite the same 
dash and style bear a Kenyon label. 
And that means we have used every bit 
of our valuable knowledge gained from 
over half a century experience in mak- 
ing fine clothing for men and women. 



(Illustrated) The black velveteen 
jacket with its charming tuxedo 
front comes alone or all fitted out 
with plaid or white flannel skirt. 

The plaited skirt in the box suit is 
quite the oddest you've seen and 
fits wonderfully. 

The coat of white polo acquires all 
its style from its simplicity of line 
and design. 

Note — Our really truly golf suit 
consists of breeches to be worn 
with either a golf-shoulder jacket 
or a long cape that allows per- 
fect freedom. 




If T 1 " '" W - ^H 

C. Kenyon Co., Inc. 



Fifth Ave. Bldg. 
New York 



223 Jackson Blvd. 
Chicago 






DRY GOODS REVIEW, February, 1921. Volume XXXIII. Published every month by the MacLean Publishing Company, Limited, 143-153 University Ave., 
Toronto. Yearly subscription price, $2. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office Department, Ottawa. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 





ROGRESS 



is assured to the Retail Dry 
Goods Merchants who utilize to 
the fullest extent all the ad- 
vantages offered by our efficient 
organization, comprising thirteen 
departments. 

Progress as the outcome of sound mer- 
chandising is the spirit of our business, 
the spirit we impart to our many thous- 
ands of customers, backed by the benefit 
of our immense buying powers. Every 
department in this great corporation is 
fully equipped to care for the merchants 
throughout Canada; stocks in anv line 
contain an extensive variety of desirable 
merchandise, thoroughly representative 
of the requirements of stvle and the needs 
of the people, and assuring 



BEST VALUES 



EXCELLENT SERVICE 



GREENSHIELDS LIMITED 

17 VICTORIA SQUARE, MONTREAL 

"Everything in Dry Goods" 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



2L & Mnq, fetlfe Company 



Uimtteb 



"3TI)e g>ilfe fyovtit of Canaba" 




All the Beauties of 

Springtime 



JAPAN 

ana 

CHINA SILKS 

CHARMEUSE 

DUCHESS SATINS 

GEORGETTES 

CREPE DE CHINES 

FANCY STRIPES 

PLAIDS 

FANCY TRIMMING 

SILKS 

PYJA9AA SILKS 

SILK SHIRTINGS 

and 

WASH SATINS 



are reflected in the Spring-like atmosphere noticeable 
in the new Silks we are showing. Soft, clinging 
Silks for the fashionable silhouette ; Taffetas ana 
kindred weaves for the bouffant styles ; Silks that 
drape beautifully, Silks that ruffle and distend, Silks 
that lend themselves in many ways to the new modes 
of the hour. 

You will be delighted with the many new and 
distinctive shades we are showing and the variety of 
smart new designs. In a nutshell, onr stock offers 
you all the lines that will contribute to brisk selling 
this Spring ! 



< 



M. §b. ^tng g>tlfe Company, Himitth 



59-61 Wellington St. West, Toronto 



Fortign Officii: 

Zurich, Switzerland 
Yokohama, Jafian 
Lyons, France 
Chefoo, China 




DRY GOODS HE VIEW 



Your Easter Requirements 
Should Be Taken 



Care of jkow! 



Trade keeps good and a scarcity of 
the popular lines quite to be expected. 



We have a splendid stock on hand 
now of the following : 

Voiles, Organdies and Silks 
Ribbons, Laces and Veilings 

Blouses in Voiles, Muslins, Crepes and Silks 
Silk Hosiery in All Shades 

Men's Shirts, Collars and Ties 




John M. Garland, Son 
& Co., Ltd. 

Ottawa - Canada 

Wholesale Dry Goods 



1) R Y G D S R E V I E W 




H. P. RITCHIE & COMPANY 



38-42 CLIFFORD STREET 



TORONTO 



Also jVjanufacturers r/Letallic Laces, Silk Lingerie, EmhroiJeries 



D I! Y (iOO DS I! !■; V I KW 




mmR 



, v. BURNISHING FA 

.SllNDOUR 
SUNDOUU CVlt' Nil I 

SUND0UR KIPS 
SUNDOUR MADKA5 



SIWOQUR RUU, 

t'(/ < i/xs( t/f/fr/y fa f i t fQM/J 



C3 



O 

ES 






The (Colour Hrnirnt in \W^ ^ 
is iiivli^tiTirtiblc^ond fife 
Q0(\\ far OtftthiUCfiftG id i oloyr 



•j\J]0V/j] 1 



led prod ucr- iron i 
yj from <w inuferSi 
yji [fii'oucihouh 



!>KY COODS REVIEW 



Oil AW A 
111 Sparks St. 





HAILEYBl RY 

.Matahanick 
Hotel 




SUDBURY 

McKle Range 

Hotel 




SHEKBROOKE 
4 London St. 



Price Stability 

lias taken up its abode at 

RACINE'S 

The House of Big Values 
and 100% Satisfaction 

\\ e are selling merchandise backed by our reputation 
for quality and good service at 

Rock-Bottom Prices 



It's Up to You to take advantage of our mighty 

convincing values in every one of our 

Fourteen Departments. 



A — Cotton Staples 

AX — Flannelettes 

B— Wash Goods 

C — Woollens 

D — Linens 

E — Dress Goods and Silks 

1 Men's Underwear and 
Sweaters 



G — Home Furnishings 

H — Ladies' Hosiery and Under- 
wear 

I — Men's Fancy Furnishings 

J — Ladies' Ready-to- Wear 

K — Smallwares and Notions 

L — Men's Fine Shirts 

M — Workingmen's Wearables 



\\ hether it is a few dozen articles or a whole car- 
load — phone, wireor write — you'll find us "on the job." 



N.B. — A new sample room has been opened at 85 Germain 
Street, St. John, N.B. 



QUEBEC 

Merger Bldg. 




SYDNEY, N.S. 

269 Charlotte 

Street 




THREE 
RIVERS 

Main Street 



RIVIERE DC LOUP 
Hotel Anrtil 




CHARLOTTETOWN, 
P.E.I. 

Queen and Sydney Sts. 



DRY HOODS ItKVIKW 




You Sell Satisfaction When 
You Sell The HOOVER 

It is a good rule to sell the best in mechanical 
devices of all kinds. 

Not always, however, is the best device the one 
which is the best known or the easiest to sell. 

The Hoover is that fortunate combination. 
Prospective purchasers usually favor The 
Hoover; they are convinced of its superiority, 
and expect to be satisfied with its use. 

You are enabled to close each sale pleasantly, 
knowing that you are adding a new friend for 
your store, or making a better friend out of 
an old customer. 

For keep this in mind: you sell satisfaction 
when you sell The Hoover. 

The Hoover Suction Sweeper Company of Canada, Limited 

Factory and Executive Offices: Hamilton, Ontario 

^e HO OVER 

It Beats . . . as it Sweeps as it Cleans 

MADE IN CANADA— BY CANADIANS— FOR CANADIANS 



P U Y GOODS UK VIEW 




INVEST NOW 

in 

HIGH-GRADE TOWELLING! 







Only QUALITY is a Good Investment 

Whether the purchase be large or small, both the merchant and the customer like 
to feel that they are getting real value. When a salesman knows his merchan- 
dise is the best of its kind he sells it with an enthusiasm which not only 
stimulates the interest of his customer but inspires a real feeling of confidence 
in the merits of the goods. 

Our Linen Department is replete with GOOD Towels and Towelling — attrac- 
tive, quick selling and profitable. 



Gray Stripe 


Unbleached Pure Linen Crash 


Width 15 in. — 20c 


Width 21 in.— 30c 


Bleached Crash (Red Border) 


Width 23 in.— 37 Vic 


Width 16 in.— 22 '/ 2 c 


Width 27 in.— 45c 


Width 19 in.— 27'/ 2 c 


Bath Towels 


Width 23 in.— 35c 


Unbleached Red Stripe Bath Towels 


Width 27 in.— 42 '/ 2 c 


18 x 34— $3.00 


I nbleached (Blue Border) 


White Bath Towels 


Width 17 in.— 22c 


16 x 33— $2.75 



Samples sent upon request 



P. P. MARTIN & CO., LIMITED 

50 St. Paul St. W., Montreal, Que. 



Quebec: 9 Rue Charest 
Toronto: 152 Bay Street 
Sherbrooke: 103 Wellington St, 



Ottawa: 25 Sparks Street 
Three Rivers: 82 Royal Street 
St. Hyacinthe: 234 Cascade Street 



I > 1 J Y GOODS IIKVIHW 




ft 






^S33 



?3ffi 



A Familiar Sign 



SHOW CASES 

AND 

FIXTURES 



Supplied by 



Kent-McClain 

Limited 



Wherever new stores are being built 
or old stores being made over to 
look like new — you will see this sign ! 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATIONS. 

(Toronto SnowCasfCo) LfflUtjM 

181-199 Carlaw Avenue 
TORONTO 



^^^ 



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10 



I'KY HOODS re vie fl- 




it 



and I buy all I can afford" 



w 



ITH a woman it isn't a question between true 
Irish linen or something else — she gets all the 
linen she is able to just for its own sake. 

High prices caused by low production failed to stop 
the steady demand until retail buyers began to stop 
buying. 

This, combined with the suggestion that there was 
practically no linen to be had, suppressed the natural 
sale of linen. 

Suppressed, but not destroyed. 

A woman will never admit that she has too many 
clothes. Nor does she ever reach the point where she 
has enough real linens. 



;> i! y (.;<)(> ds k k v i 10 w 



11 



In spite of this widespread demand existing, which 
is in abeyance for merchandising reasons, it will take 
a certain amount of energy to re-awaken active buying 
desire on the part of your customers. 

Their linen buying has been put off so much and for 
so long that to bring a linen department back to the 
full tide of its prosperity will require a strong initial 
effort. 

Linen window displays are always attractive. There 
is a lure in linens peculiar to this matchless fabric. 

Well written local advertising with a touch of the 
Irish atmosphere brings a quick popular response. 

These, with close attention to interior display and an 
attractive assortment of stock, will soon bring linens 
to their rightful position — the bright spot in the store. 



'Sfo IRISH LINEN SOCIETY 



BELFAST 



IRELAND 



American Office and Information Bureau 
239 West 39th Street, New York 



FOR 

SAnSFACTION 

Q/here is no 
substitute/or 
CJrue Irish 
finerx 



12 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 







10 









« 



« 



£3 



3 



■9 



3 



fe3 






6 



« 




All the Year Hosiery 



There is never a season without a 
demand for durable cashmere 
stockings, especially for children. 

A. B. C. Hosiery fills every require- 
ment of discriminating customers 
who want good quality, neat 
fit and durability, combined with 
economy. 

A. B. C. Hosiery has become familiar 
to Canadians through extensive 
and attractive advertising in big 
daily papers. The dealer who links 
up his hosiery display with our 
advertising gets increased sales, 

Comes in all sizes for men, women and 
children. Every pair seamless with rein- 
forced heels and toes. 

Children's Hosiery— 1 and 1 rib, sizes 4 to 10. 
Women's Hosiery—Flat stitch, perfect fit. 
Men's Half-Hose— All sizes, elastic cuff. 

Allen Bros. Co., Ltd. 

883 Dundas Street East 

Toronto 

— Selling Agents for Canada— 

WILLIAM G. EVIS & COMPANY 

28 Wellington Street West, Toronto 
"CANADIAN GOODS ARE BETTER'' 



#^*$^^^^*^ 



DRY GOODS REV] KW 



13 




SELLING AGENTS: 

Wm G. Evis & Company. 28 Wellington St. West, Toronto, 
Western and Northern Ontario, Quebec, Maritime Pro- 
vinces and Manitoba. 

Stanley McLeod, 543 Granville St.. Vancouver, B.C.. 
British Columbia. Alberta and Saskatchewan. 

H. Switzer. 193 Sparks St.. Ottawa. 
Eastern Ontario and Montreal. 



Your 

Easter 

Sales 



Every woman wants new silk 
stockings for Easter and the 
newer the style the better she 
will be please* 1. 

Latest Fashion 

Our new lines of Winsome 
Maid Hosiery in a beautiful 
two-tone heather effect, in silk 
and mercerized, will be a big 
favorite for Easter and early 
Spring. This line (Number 
400 in our stock) comes in 
five different combinations of 
the fashionable colors. Woven 
with back seam, it fits perfect ly 
and is both smart and durable. 

Pure Silk 

Winsome Maid Pure Thread 
Silk Hosiery give the perfect 
weave, neat ankle and elastic 
top which make them favorites. 
They come in a wide range of 
lovely colors, sizes 8 a /2 to 10. 

For Men 

We also carry all lines men's 
half-hose in pure silk and in 
heather effect in silk and mer- 
cerized. 



Order Now for Your 
Easter Custom. 



ALLEN SILK MILLS LIMITED 

43 Davies Avenue, Toronto 
"CANADIAN GOODS ARE BETTER" 



14 



1) R Y G O ODS REVIE W 




PURE IRISH LINEN TOWELS 

—with the 'OLD BLEACH" Reputation and Guarantee. 

A fair representative stock of this highly acceptable merchandise has been 

cleared through the customs and is available for prompt delivery from our 

Now York premises. 

All this merchandise is manufactured of selected, pure flax yarn made up to 

the highest standard of quality — and bleached by the famous "Old Bleach" 

method of sun, wind and grass. 

A featured display of this attractive merchandise will add a lustre to the linen 
department. 

Large orders will, of course, have to be imported from Randalstown, but a 
selected assortment can be shipped for immediate use during the Spring selling 
season. 






\ V 









"Old Bleach" Linen C°1j? 

<23-25 EasT 56"- Street New York. 

JRLAMONT MANAGER t 




DRY ( J ( ) ( ) I ) S R 10 V J K W 



15 




J.H.LY°N5*C° 



TELEGRAMS 
RECTOMANUS 
PHONE L°ND°N 
TELEPHONES 
MAYFAIR 
3210-2 LINES 



Jhe Colour Opecialisfs 

in Lest class silks] for gowns 

3, PRINCES ST HANOVERS Q 

LONDON .wi. 



PATTERN 
BUNCHES 

ON RECEIPT 

OF 
APPROVED 

TRADE 
REFERENCES 



If. 



DUY GOODS REVIEW 




1 ) K Y GOODS REVIEW 




°Jkc G/ov®S and IHoSlQCy 7/oUc9Q <q/ Ghnoob 



The Evidence of Your Eyes 



YV /ILL tell you that in appearance 
* * Venus Thread Silk Hosiery is 
second to none. Look farther and you 
will see that it possesses every attribute 
of perfection in silk hosiery. Perfect 
finish. Perfect shade. Perfect shape. 



Venus Silk Hosiery Mills 

Limited 

TORONTO ONTARIO 






Silk Lingerie 

IS the answer to every woman's desire 
for intimate garments of the] utmost 
uxury in texture and design with sens- 
ible service and satisfaction. There is a 
Queen Quality garment to suit every 
taste. 

St. Catharines Silk Mills 

Limited' 

ST. CATHARINES ONTARIO 



Sole Selling Agents 

Richard L.Baker LCo. 

84 Wellington StWest 

Toronto 




18 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




I) \i Y G ()() DS R E V I E W 



ooo£^-oo oo-£3ooo 1 



House Furnishings Department 





A 

Large Assortment of 

STAIR CARPETS 

Axminster 

Wilton 

Velvet and Mottled Velvet 

Tapestry and Jute 

ALL WIDTHS 

Also 
Latest Designs in 

SQUARES, RUGS a nd 
RUNNERS 

Axminster 

Wilton 

Velvet 

Tapestry 

Jute 

ALL SIZES 



SCOTCH REVERSIBLE RUGS 

We have a splendid assortment of Scotch Reversible Rugs, all sizes, with 

Rugs and Runners to Match 

COCOA MATTING MATS RUBBER DOOR MATS 



$ 



HODGSON, SUMNER & CO., LIMITED 



83-91 St. Paul St. W. 



21 St. Sulpice St. 

MONTREAL 



84-92 LeRoyer St. 



SAMPLE ROOMS: 

7 Charest St., QUEBEC Windsor Hotel, OTTAWA 

Carlaw Bldg., 28-30 Wellington St. W., TORONTO 

Can. Bank of Commerce Bldg., THREE RIVERS Metropole Building, SHERBROOKE 

503 Mercantile Bldg., VANCOUVER 50 Bon Accord St., MONCTON, N.B. 



)ooog>oo oo-<3ooo((( B) 



^JC^^[p 



looogVoo 



oo-^ooo 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 





'BETTER, Sj 

Tfc<? T.K.KELLY 

MIAJ/NCAPOLIS, Mi/N/M. U. S.A 

This Is the aru-nc ad. convenkicm of the T. K .KEIIY 
SALES SYSTEM attended by more than. £bur hundred sales - 
manager* assembled for the purpose of better merchandising 
and to add 10O% more to KELLY SALES SERVICE. 

This two dagy convention is proclaimed by big merchan- 
disers to be the bitf^esfc thing of Its kind ever inaxig 
ucaled. Over one ttiousaHd people sat down to -the 
evening banquets. Every salesman left Minneapolis, 
with a bid overstock of enthusiasm, confidence and ability. 
Stop and realize what thts mentis to thelfatJiAmerKOJiffeKficwis. 



■m 








Di;V (i()()I)S REVIEW 



21 




:> 



THESE ARE THE MEN 

THAT BACK UP THE PRINCIPLE OF THIS GREAT ORGANIZATION FORJ921 






"Iv 




.->.-> 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



CONSOLIDATED 
PLATE GLASS CO 

OF CANADA LIMITED 

WINNIPEG TORONTO MONTREAL 



Headquarters for 

Special Glass 

for Lighting Dark Store Interiors. 

Zouri 




Safety Set 
Metal Store Front Construction 

Send for Catalogue 



A Twenty Thousand Dollar Financial Expert 



There are few men who could afford to have a per- 
sonal financial expert to assist them in making the 
right kind of investments — the safe, sound invest- 
ments that can be passed on as "an enduring" legacy. 

And still fewer could afford to employ an expert who 
demanded a fee of $20,000 a year. But this is exactly 
what you have at your disposal — almost at your 
elbow — in the Investors' Inquiry Service of THE 
FINANCIAL POST. 



Readers of THE FINANCIAL POST, through this 
service, can have the securities they are considering 
thoroughly investigated before spending a single 
cent. Men skilled in getting at the hidden factors 
and bed-rock facts that determine the value of stocks 
and bonds are at your service. Often securities 
many think are valuable are found to be unpromis- 
ing, sometimes mere scraps of paper when the 
underlying features are uncovered. 



It costs nothing to be sure. It may cost much — perhaps your hard-earned savings — 
to be sorry. 

Readers of FINANCIAL POST are saved all this guesswork — this investing in the 
dark. 



Whether you invest thousands or hundreds it will pay you to use 
this splendid service — free to all subscribers who make use of it. 

THE FINANCIAL POST comes to you for one year — fifty-two 
issues on receipt of $5.00. Just attach a cheque or draft to the 
coupon. 

The Financial Post 

143 University Ave. 
Toronto 



THE FINANCIAL POST 

143 University Ave., Toronto. 

1921 

You may send me a copy of THE FINANCIAL 
POST. If after reading it carefully I decide 
not to subscribe I'll write you within five days. 
Otherwise you may bill me for one year's sub- 
scription — $5.00. 



128 Bleary Street, 
Montreal, Que. 



303 Union Trust Bldg., 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Name 



Address 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



23 




1921— A Banner Year for Athletics! 

Athletics are becoming more popular every year, not only 
with the college boy but with the Professional and Business 
Man as well. 

The Dealer who handles 




ATHLETIC GOODS 

is certain to increase his business. 

THERE'S MONEY FOR YOU IN HANDLING OUR 
"MADE-IN-CANADA" BASEBALL UNIFORMS. 

Materials of highest quality, cut to individual measure- 
ments specified, "Big League" model, unexcelled work- 
manship, at a saving of 35% Duty. Write for samples 
and prices. 

Boy Scout Uniforms, Rugby Suits, Hockey Pants, 
Soccer Pants, Gym Pants. 

"MOYER" BRAND ENSURES QUALITY, SERVICE AND SATISFACTION. 

We also manufacture White Duck Clothing: 




Hospital Clothing, 
Operating Gowns, 
Nurses' Aprons, 



Dentists' Coats, 
Barbers' Coats, 
Butchers' Coats and Aprons, 



Restaurant Clothing 
Abattoir Clothing, 
Factory Uniforms. 



A. W. MOYER & COMPANY 



Manufacturers (To the Trade Only) 



124 KING STREET WEST 



TORONTO 



>Do You 

*' Have Trouble Getting Sunset? 

Many retailers all over the country are complain- 
ing that their jobbers are continually out of stock 
— and we wish to state that there is absolutely no 
need for this condition. Your jobber can get 

Sunset SoapDyes 

In all colors — all the time 

We have large facilities and can make immediate 
shipments — if you are having trouble — write to 
our Sales Representatives for Canada 



Harold F. Ritchie & Co., Ltd. 
Toronto, Canada 

North American Dye Corporation, Ltd. 

Manufacturers 

Toronto, Canada 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 




i— — •-.— .- (Copyright),^ ,_,_,_._..} 



Discriminating merchants 
and retailers secure their 
best interests by stocking 
goods bearing the B.D.A. 
Monogram. 



GREAT INDUSTRIAL 

LINK 

pHE "raison d'etre" of the Bradford Dyers' Association, 
-1 Ltd., is to co-ordinate the Manufacturers' Craft with the 
Dyers' Art to produce goods calculated to maintain a world- 
wide supremacy. 

Z^ 1 OODS dyed and finished by the Bradford Dyers' 
^-* Association, Ltd., bear the Association's trade mono- 
gram, recognized throughout the Textile World as the Hall- 
mark of Excellence. 

PHIS distinguishing symbol is something more than the 
•1 average hall-mark. It is concrete evidence of the best 
Dye and Finish, and of a merchandising policy which 
attracts a definite clientele. All goods so stamped are identi- 
fied with their sources of origin and invested with a commer- 
cial individuality which may be summed up in two words — 

QUALITY AND RELIABILITY 

PATTERNS showing FINISHES and 
full particulars can be obtained on 
application to — 



^ 



THE 



7i 



Bradford Dyers' Association; B? 



MANCHESTER 



6 OXFORD 5 T 
5 T PETERS SO 



BRADFORD 

(Dept. 6) 39 WELL ST. 




LONDON 



128 V 129 
CMEAPSIDE I C2. 



(tOPTRICMl) 



DRV GOODS REVIEW 



25 






wuwwwuwwww^wuwsnnnrujm 




Dorothy" Voile 

:>ly a printed cotton voile 40" wide— with 
difference: "Dorothy" Voile is made of 
specially twisted cotton yarn, which makes it extra 
well-wearing, without sacrificing anything in softness and daintiness. 

"Dorothy Voile comes in stylish designs, which are always being 
added to or modified to keep abreast of latest fashions. And each 
design is prepared in seven distinct and dainty colour schemes. 



Write us for information and cuttings. 
ECOVEL— Velv iteen URB ANUS— Dress Fabric 

DOROTHY— Voile 

WOVIC — Underwear for Women 



Vk&i. 



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SA^^AV.^AlAlAlAlAlAi^AlAlAi.gSZ 



CRAOCK£RS IT 

JrJday Stree t 
JLondon Sngland. 





s&fl^m8&®mm <frEm 



The Motherland's 
Finest Fabrics 



/^ P. A. Fabrics, by reason of their high- 
^ >4# grade quality, their exclusive and dis- 
tinctive designs, have attained a position of 
pre-eminence, and every care is taken that 
nothing shall compromise this reputation. 

THE Canadian Representative for The Calico Printers' Asso- 
ciation, Ltd., is Mr. Edward Foster. He carries samples of 
all the C.P.A. Fabrics and will be pleased to exhibit these to, 
and receive enquiries from, traders interested in high-class voiles, 
prints, sateens, drills, printed handkerchiefs and furnishing 
fabrics, and the well-known specialties : Grafton Voile, Potters' 
Prints, Cepea Serge, Sheenore, Gemarkord, Cylkcel, etc. 

PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW TO ENSURE 
PROMPT DELIVERY 

Samples will be submitted on request 
Address your communications to : — 



MR. EDWARD FOSTER, 

426, Coristine Bldgs., 

20, St. Nicholas Street, 

MONTREAL, 

and 

710, Empire Buildings, 

64, Wellington Street, West, 

TORONTO. 



The Calico Printers Association 

Limited 

England 



Manchester 




<mm 



m>j 




&3S2S 



IIIBIIIIIIIIMIIIISIIIIiil 



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II 



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i 



WHOLESALE 
WOOLLEN MERCHANTS 




Our large and varied 
Range comprises: — 

COSTUME CLOTHS 

in Tweeds 

DONEGAL AND 
HARRIS EFFECTS 

DYED CHEVIOTS 
and FRIEZES 

DYED 
BLANKET CLOTHS 

VELOURS 

In colours and 
fancy checks 

JACKET CLOTHS 

MANTLE CLOTHS 

LADIES' SCARVES 

TRAVELLING 
RUGS 



We cater entirely for the 

Ladies' Trade in 

PIECE GOODS 



All orders and enquiries re- 
ceive our most careful and 
immediate attention. 



1 '1 jfctt^^l 



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" -O. *• M » 



»Vj4Lrci 



r/(e larger sample is a combination of black, green 
and white that is striking and smart. The smaller 
sample is a very pleasing light blue and fawn 
diagonal weave, with vertical blue stripe. 

"SCOBRO" materials impart to the wearer that important 
sense of satisfaction and confidence that comes with the 
knowledge that the material is always correct, always smart, 
and always dependable — for "SCOBRO" invariably means 
—"THE BEST." 

Scott Bros. & Co. 

(Proprietor - Wm. Scott) 



WILTON MILLS, 



HAWICK, 



SCOTLAND 



Cables: 
Scobro Hawick 



Codes: Marconi 
ABC, 6th Edition 



LONDON WAREHOUSE: 14 WATLING ST., E.C. 4 



I 

| 

If 



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ii 



Bimanual 



mmmmm 



Sllli 




332 -332B 332 c 
334 -336 & 271. 




GOSWELL RD.LONDON.E.ci ENG. 

Ladies' 

Leather 

Blouse 

Cases. 

Ladies' 

and 
^Gents' 

Suit 
Cases. 




CATALOG M.W.R. 12 ON REQUEST 



THE MOST PROGRESSIVE HOUSE 



IN THE 
TRADE 



Cowhide 

Kit Bags 
Suit Cases 
Brief Bags 
Dress Cases 
Masonic 
Attache Cases 
Music Cases 
Writing Cases 




Overland 
or Cabin 
Trunks 

Ladies' 
Hat Cases 

ALL GOODS ARE 
THE PRODUCT 
OF OUR OWN 
FACTORI ES 



BEST BRITISH MATERIAL AND WORKMANSHIP 



YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO VISIT 

STAND F. 103 
BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR 

WHITE CITY, SHEPHERDS BUSH, LONDON, ENGLAND 

FEB. 21 -MAR. 4, 1921 





BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
M A D E 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 



HONE'S BRITISH MADE 

DRESS SHIELDS AND 
OTHER HABERDASHERY 

Interesting announcement to Haberdashery 
Buyers visiting Britain for British Industries 
Fair, February 21st - March 4th, 1921 



Although final details are not to-day available re- 
garding the Stands we propose to occupy, we make 
this preliminary announcement in the hope that all 
our Canadian customers and other friends visiting 
Great Britain will get into touch with us in London. 
It will be our aim to do everything possible to make 
your visit pleasurable and profitable — not forgetting 
mutual business interests. 

Everything we make is of the best British work- 
manship, made and sold as reputation builders, with 
the acccumulated experience of thirty years to 
command your confidence and ensure good service. 
Our products include 

DRESS GARMENT WHALE- 

SHIELDS SHIELDS BONE, ETC. 

BONED AND SHAPED PETERSHAM BELTING 



Advise your address this side to : 

MESSRS. DANIEL HONE 

45-49 BANNER STREET, BUNHILL ROW 
LONDON, E.C. 1 ENGLAND 



CABLES : "SPRINGBOCK, BARB, LONDON" 

CODE: MARCONI 

TELEPHONE: 1800 CLERKENWELL 



BRITISH BRITISH BRITISH BRITISH BRITISH BRITISH BRITISH BRITISH BRITISH 
MADE MADE MADE MADE MADE MADE MADE MADE MADE 



BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH. 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 

BRITISH 
MADE 



30 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 





iEi^thavejWorld-wide reputation for merit. 



Sole Manufacturers: 



RIGG BROTHERS, LTD. 

Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers since 1836 
6 MOSLEY STREET, MANCHESTER, ENG. 

Cables: Rigg Brothers, Manchester 



DRV GOODS REVIEW 



31 





Rigg's Sheets 
and Sheetings 



are made throughout by modern methods of manu- 
facture at our mills at Bleaklow, near Bury, Lan- 
cashire (Eng.), from the best raw cotton the 
world can produce, selected and purified by our- 
selves. Diligent scrutiny in all stages of manu- 
facture maintains that unbeatable quality upon 
which their world-fame rests. 

When buying sheets and sheeting, avoid all imi- 
tations, and insist on having RIGG'S. ALL 
RIGG'S Sheets are vouched for by the makers. 
The mark "RIGG'S MANUFACTURE," appear- 
ing on the selvedge, constitutes a guarantee of the 
highest quality. 




To do a permanent good -class 
trade, show RIGG'Sj[SHEETS 




SPERO 

ON SELVEDGE OUR GUARANTEt 



BRITISH 




MAKE 



SUPER-STANDARDISED QUALITY 

COTTON GOODS 



3ZST iN THE WORLD 



rD5ALL tattoo. 







V 



'!■-- 



COTTON IMPORTERS 
SPINNERS. DOUBLERS 
MANUFACTURERS 
AND FINISHERS 



SPERO MILLS ON 
MANCHESTER SHIP 
CANAL— THE SHOW 
MILLS OF LANCASHIRE 



Velveteens 



Sheetings 
Madras Shirtings 



Novelty Cloths 



Pillow Tubing 
Voiles 



(WHITE ONLY) 



RICHARD HA WORTH AND COMPANY. LIMITED, ENGLAND 



The Fine Scotch Underwear 
with the Fine Scotch Finish 




THE} dry goods dealer considering 
the claims of Pesco should bear in 
mind the important fact that by rea- 
son of its quality, Pesco becomes a habit 
with the public and that this habit can 
be exploited all through the year. « 

There is, in other words, a constant sale for Pesco. 
Pesco is not merely for Summer, or for Winter, or 
for day or for night wear. It is for all times and 
all climes. It is the universal brand. Man, 
woman and child, the infant and the aged, the 
healthy and the delicate have, within the wide 
compass of its range, textures and garments 
suited to every need- and every condition of life. 
Thus, with Pesco in the fixtures, business is ready, 
steady and profitable. And the Cash Bell tinkles 
with a double meaning. Every Pesco Sale binds 
a client to a Store. 

Sole Makers: 

Peter Scott & Co., Ltd. 

Hawick - - Scotland 

London: Carey House, Carey Lane, E.C. 2. 

Canadian Agents: 

Messrs. C. & A. G. Clark, 35, Wellington Street 

West, Toronto. 

Mr. R. C. Poyser, 516, Drummond Bldg., Montreal. 

Messrs. The Hanley & Mackay Co., 62, Albert 

Street, Winnipeg. 

Showcards, Window Tickets and Literature 

supplied. Enquiries invited. 

We are exhibiting in the Clothing, Outfitting and Woollen T.r 
in the Drapery, Textile and Women's Wear Exhibition, 4th 
Hall, London, England. 




The Pesco Range 

Obtainable in Pure Wool ami Si 
and wool textures — 

For Ladies — Combinations, Vests, 
Spencers. Bodices, Drawers, Knick- 
ers. Nightdresses, Bib Vests, etc., 

For Children — Combinations, Night- 
dresses. Sleeping Suits, Shirts, 
Trousers, Knickers, etc., etc. 
For Infants — Binders, Wraps, Kilt- 

lets, Gowns, etc. _ 

For Gentlemen — Shirts, Trousers, 
Combinations, etc., etc. 
Also 
Pesco Hose and Half Hose in Black. 

Colors and Mixtures, and 

Pesco Sports Coats, Jumpers, TJnder- 

vests, Sweater Coats, Scarfs and Caps 

in the latest styles and color effects. 

Guaranteed Unshrinkable 



ades Exhibition, 8th to 18th March, 1921, and 
to 15th April, 1921, in the Royal Agricultural 



TRADE 



TRADE 



1 MARK 



9 D. DAVIS 

20 REDCROSS ST. and I BRADFORD AVE. 
LONDON, E.C. 1 , ENG. 

ESTABLISHED 1895 



MANUFACTURER OF ORIGINAL AND EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS IN 

HIGH-CLASS LEATHER GOODS, LADIES' HAND BAGS 
JEWEL CASES, POCKET BOOKS, WALLETS, PORTFOLIOS 

FITTED ATTACHE CASES 




WE SHALL BE PLEASED TO WELCOME ALL 
PRESENT AND PROSPECTIVE CANADIAN CUSTOMERS 

AT OUR EXHIBIT 

STAND F. 42 

BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR, WHITE CITY, LONDON, ENG. 

FEBRUARY 21-MARCH 4, 1921 



i ) 1 1 \ ( ; ( ) i ) i > b Ki'iVihw 



.-..) 




vW lLD&CO.,t^ 

V*^\. •• ^"^ Manufacturers "^* *MM 

** DVe'd Flannelettes • 



Wholesale and Export Only 




Quality, Finish and Reliability Unsurpassed 



Dominion Agents : 

CANADA:. Geo. H. Napier, 417, Coristine Bldgs., Montreal. 
AUSTRALIA: C. E. Wain, Commerce House, Flinders Lane, Melbourne. 
NEW ZEALAND: F. C. Brookbanks, 23, Strand Arcade, Auckland. 

SOUTH AFRICA: E. O. Robotham, Strathearn House, Rissick and Fox Streets, Johannes- 
burg. 

68, MAJOR ST., MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 



Code: 
ABC (5th edition) 



Cables : 
"VAALETTE, MANCHESTER' 



*■■■«>■■»«< 



JT WORSTED 

ARNS 



SP1NKER50F 
WORSTED 

yARHs 

FOR 
MANUFACTURE 
OF HOSIERy 
UHPERWEAR, 

0RKH1J GflODS. 



♦ ■»> 



a 



>i ~ 



* V", 



"*• // 



■■■■ 



' 



H«ad Off tit :• 

STAMFORD 5T. 
LEICESTER. 

TeUgraitv : .-5!A.RHS leittsfcr. 
Telephone 2^70-1 Leicester. 

American. Agents :- 

J.&W. BASTARD 

(BOSTOH)C?. 
1S4 5UMMER ST 
BOSTO^U.S.A. 

Bradford Office •.- 

195/6 SWAN ARCADE, 
BRADFORD. 



liiJJm • 



- i 



/ 



/ 






- fc 



J.&WBASTARD 

-^ SPINNERS 

LEICESTER. - 



\) li I U U U U Q 1\ Hi V i ill w 



drf 




I 



manufacturers of HABERDASHERY & SM ALLW ARES 

Owning ten of the best equipped modern factories in Great Britain 
producing many specialities known throughout the world, such as : 



HURCULACES— the British Laces 
for Boots and Shoes — made under 
the most approved methods of 
manufacture, the secret of their durability 
being the great strength of the threads 
which tenaciously cling together and 
resist wear. STRENGTH ^DURABILITY. 



MENDING WOOLS & SEWING 
COTTONS. The St. George's 
and Crusoe All-Wool Mendings 
are noted for their softness and Strength 
in wear, their Smoothness in. working, 
and their high quality and finish. Crusoe 
Cottons are an equally famous line. 



SPHERE HOSE SUPPORTERS for 
Ladies Wear, enjoy the widest popu- 
larity because their quality throughout 
is the finest possible. Made and finished 
with thoughtful attention to detail. Each 
pair fitted with the famous " Grip that 
grips and never slips." SPHERE Suspen- 
ders, Garters and Arm Bands for Mens 
Wear are supplied in many neat and attrac- 
tive designs ; also Sphere Brownies, 
the Hose Supporters for Little Folks. 

ELASTICS : The St. George's Brand 
Elastics, including the well-known 
" Violet" Quality, Braids, Cords, 
Garter and Loom Elastics. 



NAME LABELS, HANGERS and 
LOOPS for Coats, Shirts, Mantles, 
etc. This is a notable speciality 
of ours. 



C 



OTTON WEBBINGS and BIND- 
INGS : Skirt Bindings (single and 
duplex), Glace Bindings, Tapes, 



Galloons, Stay Bindings, Hat Bindings,etc. 

Here you have the fast selling lines, the lines for YOU. 



TO WHOLESALERS 
ALL OUR LINES. 



-Get in touch with us A T ONCE for fuller particulars of 
We will do our part with prompt service. 



iniiiiiimii i iiiiiMiiiuiijiiiiimimi 



"WHOLESALE ONLY 



FAIRE BRO s & Co., Ltd., LEICESTER, 



LONDON : Faire Bros. &. Co., Ltd.. 19 Fore Street. E.C. 2. 
SOUTH AFRICA : Davies, Gnodde & Smith. 1 Strand Street. 

Port Elizabeth. 
MELBOURNE: Alfted F. Smith, 2 Fink's Buildings. Elizabeth 

Street. Melbourne. 
SYDNEY: Alfred F. Smith, 39 Queen Victoria Buildings, 
George Street. 




ENGLAND. 

CHRISTCHURCH: Robert Malcolm, Ltd., 79 Lichfield Street. 

Also Auckland, Wellinaron, Dunedin. 
BOMBAY : F. A. Filmer & Co.. Gaietv Buildings, Hotnbv Road. 
NORWAY : Hermod Riis, Grev Wedels Plass 4, Christiania. 
SWEDEN : Anglo-Amerikanska Import A.B. Skeppsbron 3, 

Gothenburg. 
DENMARK : Adolf Berendt, St. Kongensgade 36/8, Copenhagen 




^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n n i n 1 1 1 1 ;.i i ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 him u i in 1 1 1 u 1 1 1 1 1 iiiiriii i m 1 1 hi ii 1 1 1 mi 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ij iiiji iii i hi n i i:iiiinTiii,iiiii;|ii;iiiiiii[iiiiiiiiii 



WE SPECIALIZE 
in CLOTH for 
LADIES' WEAR 



I 38 


• 


I SANDSERGES 




I TWEEDS 




| BLANKET CLOTHS 


1 


| WORSTED COATINGS 




1 * 




JOSEPH FOSTER & 


Co. 


I CALDER MILLS 




ELLAND, YORKSHIRE 




ENGLAND 

Established 1863 London Warehouse : 

1 LANGHAM PLACE 
REGENT STREET W. 

- 4 

i 

iiin||fflltal!ll|i|ll1Mlll1IIIW^ 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 





REGISTERED TRADE MARK Canadian No. 116. Folio 27150. 



Important to Buyers of 

HIGH CLASS COTTON FABRICS 



Pi 



ease 



Note 



THE 

"FERSTRONG" BRAND 

is a guarantee of the Highest Quality, also of an 
absolute uniformity of quality in all repeat business, as 
all the FERSTRONG Materials are made out of 
the Finest and Purest Cotton the World can Produce 

White and Dyed Cambrics 

Also the 

CREPE - DE ■ FERSTRONG 

the BEST Substitute for Crepe-de-Chine 

These materials are unrivalled for making up Ladies' and 
Children's underwear, also Blouses, Jumpers, Camisoles 
and all kinds of Ladies' and Children's Dainty Garments. 

Also High -Class Range of Longcloths. 

Write to FERSTRONG Dept. for the names of our Wholesa'e 
Agents ; also Free Patterns and full information on writing to 

"FERSTRONG DEPARTMENT" 

52 FAULKNER STREET, MANCHESTER, ENGLAND >> 



KING'S CELEBRATED 
SCOTCH WINDOW HOLLANDS 



have been made for one 
are recognized throughout 
most saleable shading. They 
are unshrinkable, fast colors 
and widths. To insure get 
ers are advised to Examine 
Also inside Holland Tab on 
that each bears name of 




hundred and forty years and 
the world as the best and 
are unequalled for quality, 
and made in all colorings 
ting genuine goods, custom- 
Tickets and Paper Bands. 
end of each piece and see 
"John King & Son." 



SOLD BY ALL LEADING WINDOW SHADE JOBBERS 

Made by 

JOHN KING & SON 

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 

Established 1775 
Canadian Representatives : CAMPBELL, SMIBERT & CO., MONTREAL and TORONTO 



Robert Morton & Sons 

Muslin Manufacturers 

34 Albion St., Glasgow 

— SPECIALTIES — 

Buckrams - Sparteries - Marlys 

MILLINERY MUSLINS in BLACK, 
WHITE and COLORS 

Also 

PALE BOOKS, NAINSOOKS, 
LAWNS, INDIA LINONS, 
PERSIAN LAWNS, CHECK 
CRINOLINES, MADRAS and 

HARNESS MUSLINS, Etc., Etc. 



Cablet: Morton, Glasgow 



Code: Marconi 



Canadian Rcprescntalioe ' 

STRACHANS, LTD. 

Empire Building, 64 Wellington St. West 

TORONTO 



KIDMAR HOSIERY CO. 

53 McPHAIL ST., BRIDGETON, GLASGOW 



Makers of 



Ladies' Sports Coats 

Made from best Scotch Fingering Yarns 
in all Shades. Guaranteed All Wool. 

Children's Jerseys 

Made of Wool with cotton back. In all 
sizes and shades. Styles with button 
shoulders and also polo collars. 

All-Wool Shawls 

For Infant Wear. Made from finest Cross- 
bred and Merino wools. In large range of 
designs and any sizes required. Also in 
Black and Colours. 



Agents : 

WRIGHT & MORGAN 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 



DRY GOO DS RE V I E \Y 



41 





Decorations by 
DOBSONS and 

MBR0WNE&6I? 

(The Amalgamated firms) 

Wholesalers an J 

Importers on]/ 

■ Factories;-" 

Meadows MilljNoftingkam 

k .1 r» i. n.n 



■ Beeston ■ 

VictoriaMillsJ)raycott, 

Burn Road Mills, 

• Darvel,>(.B." 

■Head Offices:- 
Station Street 
Nottinghamjing. 




Cables :-Brun,Nottingham.Eng 

Direct Representative : Mr. A. J. Burrows 



"Viyella" 
"Aza" 

{Rtgd) 

"Clydella" 

^Unshrinkable Flannels 



Ou 1921 Spring Price 
List is now in force and, 
if not received, is avail- 
able on request. 






WM. HOLLINS & CO., LTD. 

(OF ENGLAND) 

62 Front Street W., Toronto 
45 E. 17th Street, New York 



r 



42 



I > K \ t. U (.) I ) S K. Hj V 1 £j W 




FAUDELS, LIMITED 

NEWGATE STREET, E.C. 1, LONDON, ENGLAND. 
EXPORTERS OF 

Hosiery, Haberdashery, 
Laces, Embroideries, Veilings, Ribbons, Cords and Fancy 

Goods of Every Description. 

SPECIALIZING IN 

Peacock and Squirrel Brands of Knitting Wools, 
also Pure and Artificial Knitting- and Sewing Silks. 

FOR CANADIAN TRADE ^tfek 

STAND No. E. 81 
White City, Shepherds Bush 
BRITISH INDUSTRIES FAIR, Feb. 21-Mar. 4,1921 

CABLES: FAUDEL, LONDON. 





. C. McGregor & Co. 

53 McPhail St. Bridgeton, Glasgow 



J 



Makers of 



Furnishing Muslins 

Madras Muslins in cream, white and col- 
oured, in all-over and border designs, 
Harness, Spots, Sprigs, Lappets, Brise-bise 
and Waterfall Curtains 

Dress and Millinery 
Muslins 

Book Muslins, Robe Muslins, Lawns, Nain- 
sooks, Madapollams, etc. 

Agents 

WRIGHT & MORGAN 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 



TELEGRAMS: 
WAKEFUL 
GLASGOW 



CODE: 
A.B.C. 

5TH EDITION 



WILSON & CO. 

48 ALBION STREET 

GLASGOW 



MANUFACTURERS 



Ecru and Colored Madras Muslins, 

Coin Spots and Figured Harness 

Book Muslins Robe Muslins 

Voiles 

Anglo-Swiss and Broche Muslins, 

"Wilsco" Lawns, "Zelette" 

LACE CURTAINS 

LACE NETS 



DKY GOODS REVIEW 



43 




1TT»»»»»**J 



LION CREST FABRICS 




,. „ .».. t ...i...i.««««Mii»wiiMiiim m 



am cixx3tn a»M» « m«»~T"ir" HX" 



CASEMENTS 

We keep up our large variety in 27", 30", 36" and 50 
Casements. Best value on the market. 

CRETONNES 

Extensive ranges in 30" Domestics and Sateens. 

Specialty in 50" Reversible and 50" Taffeta Duplex. 
High-class and latest styles. 

Through Wholesale and Shipping Only. 



Canadian Representative : 

GEO. H. NAPIER 

l[417 Coristine Building - Montreal 



TEXTILE SMALLWARES 

JAMES CARR & SONS, LIMITED 

CLARENCE MILLS 

CLARENCE STREET. CHESTER ROAD 

MANCHESTER 

Manufacturers of all classes of Webs, 
Cords and Bindings, in cotton, wor- 
sted and linen; Curtain Webs, Edg- 
ings, Layon Borders, Blind Cords, 
Carpet Binding, Cotton Banding, etc. 

Original Patentees of 
CARR'S WOVEN LADDER TAPE. 

WHOLESALE ONLY. 

Agent for Canada: 

Mr. D. F. Moore 

Manchester Building, Melinda Street 
TORONTO 



MILLINERY AND HABERDASHERY WIRE, 
Chenilles, Hat Braids, Dress and Mantle, 
Cords and Girdles, Artificial Silk, Braids and Rib- 
bons, Russia Braids, Embroidery Silks, Tassels, 
Pom, etc. Upholstery Cords and Trimmings, Scroll, 
Argyle, Saddle Bag and Flat Gimps, DRESS 
FRINGES, Tassels, etc. 

MADE IN SILK, COTTON, WOOL, ETC. 

ARTIFICIAL SILK STRAW BRAIDS 
for MILLINERY HAT MANUFACTURING 

SUPPLIERS TO WHOLESALERS AND SHIPPING HOUSES 

Shipping and Strictly Wholesale Trade Especially Catered For 




^no«o 




P. DAVENPORT 

Bridge St. Mills, - Macclesfield, England o*»°»d^ 

Telegrams: Davenport, Macclesfield 
MANCHESTER OFFICE : 39 PICCADILLY 

Canadian Agent: R. C. PARSONS, 213 CLOSE ^SpfV 
AVENUE, TORONTO 2**^1 



44 



n I; Y GOODS REVIEW 




From the Home of the PURE SCOTCH TWEEDS 




WE SPECIALIZE IN 



Highest Class Pure Scotch Tweeds, Worsteds, Etc. 



FOR 



LADIES' and GENTS' WEAR 

A Hearty Invitation is Extended to All CANADIAN Buyers to Visit Our Mill. 

PETER ANDERSON, - Manufacturer 



BRIDGE MILL 



GALASHIELS 



SCOTLAND. 



j jj u imimun 



JiiUi:iiiniiniiinniltmi:. :i ""ir 




"""MTItllllll 




The Hall-Mark of 

Maximum Comfort and 
Durability at Minimum Cost. 

FIRST IN THE FIELD AND STILL LEADING. 

Manufactured on THE GRADUATED 
PRINCIPLE, and Commencing with TWO 
THREADS in the TOP, it increases in 
WEAR-RESISTING PROPERTIES as it 
descends. 

Thus THE LEG HAS THREE THREADS, 
THE INSTEP AND FOOT FOUR, 
and the HEEL and TOE FIVE, 
making it essentially 



L 



A HALF HOSE 
FOR HARD WEAR. 

ABSOLUTELY SEAMLESS 
PERFECT IN FIT 
GUARANTEED UNSHRINKABLE 



To be had from any of the Leading Wholesale Dry Coods Houses. 

t M rT MM Tir M TTrlTrTI M Tr M TT M T H T M TTI M I M r W TrTTTtTITI MM 




WHITEWEAR 

for Spring Sewing 

Place your order now for the coming demand for 
Horrockses' famous Cottons, India Longcloths, 
Nainsooks, Cambrics and Madapolams. 

The new price lists issued on January 1st show 
substantial reductions from last year's prices — 
and you are further protected in your buying by 
their guarantee that you will receive the benefit 
of any further reductions which may occur before 
your orders are filled. 



JOHN E. RITCHIE, Canadian Agent 
591 St. Catherine St. W. - MONTREAL 

Branches : Toronto and Vancouver 

UNITED STATES AGENTS: 

WRIGHT & GRAHAM COMPANY 

110 Franklin St., New York City 

HORROCKSES, CREWDSON & CO., LIMITED 

Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND 



DEY 000 !>S R E V I l!W 



45 




For Easter 
the Biggest 

Selling 
> Proposition 




HER LADYSHIP GARMENTS 




We have IN STOCK for immediate delivery 
an extraordinarily fine selection of Ready-to- 
Wear Garments of "Her Ladyship Brand," 
including 

Voile and Silk Waists 

Silk Camisoles 

Silk Underskirts 

Top Skirts in Silk Poplin and 
Taffeta Stripes 

Children's Bonnets (Special Im- 
port from England ) 

.4/50 

"SOVEREIGN BRAND" DRESS GOODS 

The Finest Procurable 

Skirtings in Fancy Stripes and 

Plaids 
Wool Gabardines 
Wool Tricotine 
Silk Tricolette 

"Queen Quality" Taffeta Silk 
"Lucerne" Satin 
Printed Voiles 
Printed Marquisettes. 

Mail Order Forms sent upon request. 




THE W. R. BROCK COMPANY 



LIMITED 
WHOLESALE DRY GOODS 

MONTREAL 



1 I *. I 



\** \S \s 




**7\ 



^y^Sf\ Tape Quality 
ISPEMp is at its best 



in 



SUPER SHRUNK INDIA TAPE 

Manufactured by 

George H. Wheatcroft Co. 
Wirksworth, Eng. 

Tailors and others who 
use tape extensively like 
a brand that neither 
stretches nor shrinks. 
Those who have used 
"Super Shrunk India" 
are loudest in its praise, 
for they find it gives 
longest wear and great- 
est satisfaction. Have 
YOU tried it? 

Sole Agents for Canada: 

Walter Williams & Co., Ltd. 




THE STAC. 



r MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



QUEBEC 

508 Read Building 20 Wellington St. W. 533 St. Valier St. 
VANCOUVER, 217 Crown Building 



IMPORTERS and MANUFACTURERS 

Art Needlework and Fancy Goods 

"Peri-Lusta" "Crystal" 

Mercerized Cottons Artificial Silk 

Embroidery Materials 

Fancy Linens and Piece Goods 

MADEIRA HAND EMBROIDERED 
LINENS and HANDKERCHIEFS 

Campbell, Metzger & Jacobson 

932-938 Broadway New York Cor. 22nd St. 

Canadian Showroom and Factory : 

Bay and Wellington Sts., - Toronto, Canada 



The Working Man's Choice 

TAPATCO 

Working Gloves 

The man who must use a working glove knows what the 
essentials are for hand comfort, efficiency, and long 
wear. TAPATCO Gloves include all the features that 
contribute to these essentials. 
Wide range of styles, weights and colors. 

The American Pad & Textile Co. 

Chatham, Ontario 



MAI 

t 



GOOD TAILORING IS LABOUR LOST 
IF THE CLOTH* IS ILL SHRUNK 



~4/w» 



MAKE SURE IT IS SHRUNK :: AND WELL SHRUNK :: AND KNOW BY WHOM 

THERE'S LITTLE SATISFACTION IN SUCH A STAMP AS "SHRUNK." "WELL 
SHRUNK," "LONDON SHRUNK," OR "SHRUNK BY LONDON PROCESS." 
INSIST ON A SHRINKER'S GUARANTEE— ON THE STAMP OF A FIRST 
CLASS FIRM OF LONDON SHRINKERS— BEST OF ALL ON THE STAMP OF 

JENNENS, WELCH Co., Ltd., 

Cloth Workers and Shrinkers, and Proprietors of the Famous "JENNWEL" Waterproof Finish 

LONDON, HUDDERSFIELD and BRADFORD, ENGLAND. 

WHEN ORDERING ENGLISH CLOTHS. SAY "TO BE SHRUNK BY JENNENS. WELCH & CO.. Ltd." 



-jrillllllNIIIMIMIIUIinilllMIIIIIMIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIlNIIIIIIINIi'llinnill'INIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII.IIIIIIIIMNIMIIIIIL- 

I ABERDEEN GLOVE I 
COMPANY, LTD. 

70 CHAPEL STREET. ABERDEEN 

A. B.C. CODE, 5th EDITION | 
Makers of the 1 

FAMED ABERDEEN GLOVE 

Specialties : | 

MEN'S, LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S 
KNITTED WOOLLEN GLOVES. GAUNTLETS, etc. 

Agents : 
JAMES CROIL & SONS ARCHIBALD WRIGHT & CO. 

ST. NICHOLAS BLDCS. 32 SILVESTER WILLSON BLDG. 

MONTREAL WINNIPEG 



ESTABLISHED 1849 



BRADSTREET'S 

Offices Throughout the Civilized World 
OFFICES IN CANADA: 



Calgary, Alta. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Halifax, N.S. 
London, Ont. 
Sydney, N.S. 



Ottawa. Ont. 
St. John N.B. 
Vancouver. B.C. 
Victoria, B.C. 



Montreal, Que. 
Quebec, Que. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



Hamilton, Ont., and St. John's, Nfld. 



Reputation gained by long years of vigorous, 
conscientious and successful work. 

JOHN A. THOMPSON, General Manager, Western Canada 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 



DRY GOODS REVIKW 



47 




TORONTO 



SPRING AND SUMMER 

WASH FABRICS fM 1 92 1 

Our stock of Fancy TV ash Fabrics is now practi- 
cally complete. We have already done a huge 
Spring Business and are now in a position to handle 
a good volume of Sorting Orders. 

The Range Is Extensive 

The Styles Are Right 

The Prices Are on the New Low Basis 



FANCY PRINTED VOILES 

In great variety — in medium and 
large floral effects, also in conven- 
tional and geometric designs. 

See that the latter are well represent- 
ed in your stock. They are slated 
for big business. 

FANCY PRINTED ORGANDIES 

These are another of the season's 
favorites. They are mostly in medium 
and light colors. The effects are 
beautiful. 

PLAIN COLORED VOILES 

Four qualities carried by us in 
ranges of colors. Values are excellent. 
Prices about half last August figures. 



PLAIN COLORED ORGANDIES 

These are some of the most active 
goods we have. The year 192 1 
promises the greatest organdie busi- 
ness in all our experience. Are you 
prepared ? 

FANCY RATINES, Stripes and Checks 

Ideal medium weight goods for 
Dresses, Jumpers or Skirts. These 
are English goods and exceedingly 
pretty and serviceable. We have 
Ratines also in plain white-striped. 



PERSONAL INSPECTION INVITED, 
or see samples with our travellers. We 
will gladly send cuttings when re- 
quested. 



WAREHOUSE 



BAY AND WELLINGTON STS., TORONTO 



4^ 



DRY liOODS UKV1EW 




Distinctive 
Simplicity 

The Spring mode interpreted 
in the language of "la jeune 
fille" means a boxy sort of jac- 
ket, a straight slim skirt — and 
a sash. No costume (or the 
primrose season will be quite 
alluring without its soft ribbon 
girdle and long sash ends. This 
particular Spring maid chooses 
grey, of course, with a smart 
chapeav. of vivid blue. 



DRV GOODS RE VIE W 



49 



ESTABLISHED 1887 

Issued the 15th I' each month 

Published by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LTD. 

14.?- 153 University Avenue Toronto, Cana la 

Branch Offices: 
M«DNTREAL^128 Bleury St. 
WINNIPEG— 1103 Union Trust Building. 
VANCOUVER 314 Carter- Cotton Building. 
LONDON, England— 88 Fleet St., E.C. 
NSW YORK— 1606 St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway. 
CHICAGO— 405-6 Transportation Bldg.; 608 Dearborn St. 
BOSTON— 734 Old South Building. 

Subscription Rates - 

In Canada, per year $2.00 

Outside Canada, per year $3 .00 

Single Copies, 25 cents. 



Vol XLIII 



TORONTO, FEBRUARY, 1821 



No. 2 



BETTER BUSINESS 

BUYERS, traveller.-, merchants and manufacturers 
are unanimous in the opinion that a marked im- 
pmvement characterizes the trade at the present time. 

"I helieve that when Spring business opens up mer- 
< hantS all over the Dominion will enjoy a prosperous 
season," says Jack McNabb, of Peterborough, who has 
just opened his own store. "We are looking forward 
i" a splendid Spring business," admits the head of a 
prominent London dry goods concern. From Mon- 
treal, Winnipeg, and Toronto; from the Pacific coast 
and the Maritime Provinces come optimistic reports. 
Business is very much improved, buying is very fair. 
and the public demand for commodities is being 
evidenced in all centres. The situation in the dry goods 
market is quite surprisingly lacking in sensation, and 
only the chronically pessimistic dare suggest that the 
outlook for Easter business is not far better than any- 
one dreamed it would be. 

Tn order to retain and merit the returning con- 
fidence of the consumer, all branches of the trade will 
have to work together in the cause of better value. 
1 here is no excuse now for poor workmanship or in- 
ferior grades. There is no room on the market for 
unsatisfactory merchandise, and there is no mad rush 
into the market for goods "at any price." 

There is a need for carefully chosen and reliable 
stocks of goods, and as retail business has been fairly 
consistent in almost every centre, it follows that mer- 
chants will require to replenish their stocks in many 



lines. Even so, thej have now plenty of time to pick 
and choose, and the manufacturer who offers the besl 
grade goods will undoubtedly be favored, for it is now 
universally understood that the public will willingly 
pay a fair price tor merchandise of quality. 



N", 



/'LEASED CUSTOMERS 
business can be made a success unless its cus- 
,mers are so well pleased with the goods and the 
service which they get that they will continue as cus 
tomers and try to gel other customers for you. 

Any business— be it a little store on some cross- 
roads corner, or the greatest establishment in the world 
—cannot build up its business or keep its business on 
dissatisfied customer's. H costs more to get a customer 
than your immediate profit on that customer. Getting 
a new customer is an investment. The profit you make 
on the business that you do with that customer is a 
dividend. You do not and cannot immediately get 
back your principal. You must depend upon repeat 
orders and continual patronage to earn enough divi- 
dends to pay back your investment. 



EDITORIAL BRIEFS 
PAT yourself on the back, Mr. Merchant, Spring is 
here and so is your customer. 

=F * * 

DON'T wait for business to get better. Make it better, 
and then induce everybody else to see that it is better. 
You'll feel a lot better yourself! 

* % H 5 

LIKEWISE, place your orders for what you need with- 
out delay. Some of the buyers just back from New 
York say that there was an awful scramble — yo« know 

what that means. 

* * * 



1 F YOU'RE holding a 'sale, make it a good sale and 
give value. If you are holding a "Made-in-Canada sale," 
he sure that the line you offer is worthy of the slogan, 
then go to it and give Canada credit by giving punch 
to your sale and value to the consumer. Don't have 
any come-back — that's bad business, poor patriotism 
and slovenly service. 



EVERY salesman and assistant should decide now to 
make the most of his opportunities in 1921. It is the 
man who takes a big interest in his work who invariably 
forges to the front. No matter how good a business 
may be, the stranger must judge it by its letterhead. 
A poor* letterhead makes a weak impression. The 
dry goods merchant deals with the best people in the 
community, and it is poor business on his part to use 
cheap stationery. 



50 



Dry Goods Review 



Take the Business That Belongs to You 

Get Busy, Enlist the Co-operation of the Other Merchants in Your Town and Divert Mail 
Order Business to Your Own Counters — How Does This Campaign Scheme Appeal 

to You ? 



By IVA RAE MERRITT 



A GREAT deal has been said about 
dealing with mail order houses. 
I worked with a mail order con- 
cern for two years, and am very well 
acquainted with the way they take ad- 
vantage of every bit of dissatisfaction 
that one might receive from the neigh- 
borhood store, but seldom have I seen 
the small town merchant run a cam- 
paign against the mail order house. 
Here and there a half-hearted effort is 
made. 

Why not have an Anti-Mail Order 
Week in your town? Get together with 
the other merchants and go after mail 
order business in the same way they go 
after your business. 

Well I remember the busy days we 
had when our mail order concern put 
its shoulder to the wheel and went after 
new customers. They issued circulars 
explaining in short, easy-to-understand 
sentences just why mail order houses in 
general and their house in particular 
can sell goods cheaper than any store 
in the country. That was their chief 
drawing card. Then, in order to get 
the trade away from their mail order 
competitors they issued little booklets 
telling just why they could deliver more 
promptly than any other mail order 
house in existence. All these circulars, 
booklets and seasonable greetings were 
enclosed with mailing matter that would 
have been sent anyway, such as checks, 
vouchers, delivered goods, etc. 

Of course the dry goods man cannot 
go after his business in the same way; 
he should take advantage of the many, 
many drawbacks of the mail order 
house. The event should be preceded 
by an effective teaser campaign. Dur- 
ing your Anti-Mail Order Week show a 
different printed card in your window 
each day. Have printed circulars to 
give out to each customer, explaining 
your advantages over mail order houses. 

Buying Unseen 

Monday can be the "Buying Unseen" 
day. This is an old reason, so it should 
be dressed in a different way. A card, 
somewhat startling as to color and 
printing, should have the place of honor 
in your window. Group around the card 
merchandise that people would not think 
of buying before it had been carefully 
examined. The card should be worded 
something like this: 

"WHY THROW MONEY AWAY TO 
THE WINDS? 
"When you come into this store to 
buy a hair ribbon for Sally and some 



Begin To-day 

// you feel that the mail order 
houses are doing you out of busi- 
ness that is rightfully yours, don't 
sit still and fret about it. Get up, 
and get busy and expend a little 
energy on this growing problem. 
Talk it over with the other retail 
dry goods merchants in your town. 
Then go after the business, and get 
it — but first read Iva Rae Merritt's 
plan for a campaign week. It is 
full of good ideas and will help you 
in more ways than one. 



socks for Dad do you just ask the 
clerk to wrap you up three yards of 
pink ribbon and a pair of No. 11 socks? 
OF COURSE YOU DON'T. You ask 
to see pink ribbons. You finger this 
quality and that quality. You ask if 
we have any more shades of pink. 
You fish out a piece of dress material 
and consult the clerk as to colors, and 
finally you buy the ribbon. 

"Then you go to the sock counter. 
You ask for brown socks. You dis- 
card this pair because it is too dark, 
and that because it is too light, and 
finally decide upon the happy medium. 

"You leave the store happy because 
you know you are satisfied. You 
leave us happy because we have done 
our best and have made a sale. 

"If you are particular to see colors 
and feel quality here why do you 
blindly send your money to a mail 
order house and take the chance of 
getting what you want? 

"BE BUSINESSLIKE. SEE BE- 
FORE YOU BUY." 

Satisfactory Returns 

On your second day have a new card 
in the window. It should deal with the 
matter of returned goods. The card 
should read something like the follow- 
ing: 

"GEE!! AIN'T IT A GRAND AND 

GLORIOUS FEELING 
when you have bought a length of 
silk that has a flaw in it to be able 
to take it back and blow up the clerk 
and then get a new length of silk? 
IT SURE IS A GREAT FEELING 
but it is something you are deprived 
of when you buy from a mail order 
house. They, no doubt, take back 
goods but you have to wait, wait and 
wait and then like as not receive a 



check and have to come here and buy 
your goods. 

BUY HERE AND SAVE TIME AND' 
TEMPER." 

Have merchandise with flaws in it on 
one side of the card and perfect mer- 
chandise on the other side. Make your 
customers feel that you are human and 
as liable to make a mistake as the next 
person, but at the same time you are 
more than willing to rectify the mistake,, 
once made. 

Price the Same — No Bargains 

In all their literature the mail order 
houses are very careful to leave out 
anything about weekly bargains. Here 
is something that is impossible for the 
mail order concern, and should be taken 
advantage of by the merchant. For 
your Wednesday card, have a small pic- 
ture of a large building in one corner 
and a picture of your store in the other. 
Along the front of the mail order build- 
ing paint a large sign: "NO BARGAIN 
DAY HERE." On the picture of your 
building have a sign— "WEDNESDAY- 
BARGAIN DAY." Under the two pic- 
tures have the following advice: 

"In these days of bargains and still 
more bargains, don't rely upon mail 
order houses. While the mail order 
concern is selling an article at the 
original price, it has been reduced' 
here. 

"You may get a book of special bar- 
gains from your mail order house, but 
you must remember that while they 
were printing the book and mailing it 
out, the prices have dropped still fur- 
ther. If you buy their so-called bar- 
gains you are more than likely paying 
a high price for your goods. They 
can't keep up with the falling prices."' 
On each side of this sign have articles 
greatly reduced in price. Show, when 
it is possible, that several reductions 
have been made on the article so as to' 
prove the statement of the card that 
prices are dropping quicker than the 
mail order house can keep up with. 

No Comparisons Can Be Made 

For Thursday have a Comparison Day. 
On one side of the card have an article 
of a certain color and design. On the 
opposite side have the same sort of 
article but of a different color and per- 
haps a slightly different design. The- 
card should be worded something like 
this: 

"HOW DO YOU KNOW THAT TUR- 
QUOISE BLUE IS MOST BECOM- 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



51 



ING? How about this yellow? It 
just matches your hair. Perhaps you 
would like this better. 

"Come in!! Bring your friends!! 

"Try on both shades. Take them 
both home with you and bring back 
the one you don't want. Take your 
time. We want you to be satisfied. 

"Remember, though, if you were 
buying from a mail order house you 
would have to make up your mind 
right away. 

"Patronize the store that treats you 
right, the store that gives you a 
chance to find out just exactly what 
color and design you want. 

"REMEMBER! If you were buying 
this (dress) from a mail order con- 
cern, you would never be quite sure 
whether the blue dress might have 
suited you better than the yellow. 
You couldn't have had the two side 
by side and tried on first one and then 
the other before deciding." 

Dissatisfaction Day 

Rather a queer sort of a day to have, 
isn't it? Anyway it is unusual. Have 
Friday for your dissatisfaction day card. 
In the middle of your card have a pic- 
ture of a young lady. She should wear 
a bright blue hat, a sweater of a differ- 
ent shade of blue, a dress with pink dots 
and a pair of stout walking .shoes,, 
together with a pair of sheer white silk 
stockings. Underneath the picture have 
the words "Miss Mail Order House." 
Then in finer type have the following: 

"Miss Mail Order House wanted a 
nice blue outfit. She received the blue 
hat O K, but the Mail Order House 
was out of dresses with blue dots, 
so they sent her a pink one instead. 
She THOUGHT the sweater would 
match the _hat, because it did in the 
illustration, but OF COURSE it didn't. 
She received the white silk stockings 
and was very pleased with them, but 
as the Mail Order House was out of 
white pumps, they sent the nice stout 
walking shoes instead. They also sent 
a man's umbrella instead of the blue 
parasol, but Miss Mail Order House 
left that at home. 

SHE WANTED THAT OUTFIT FOR 
A SPECIAL PICNIC PARTY. SHE 
HAD SPENT ALL HER MONEY ON 
IT AND IT WAS EITHER A CASE 
OF WEARING THE THINGS OR 
STAYING HOME. 

Yes! ! Miss Mail Order 

House was the Belle of the 
party 

I DON'T THINK 

Such a thing couldn't have happen- 
ed if she had bought her clothes here. 

Around the side have a well balanc- 
ed display, with every article blending 
in with its neighbor. 



For the final day, have a grand boost 
for your store. Show the best and lat- 
est styles, especially styles that have 
suddenly sprung up. In the middle of 
the display have a card something like 
the following: 

"Be In Style 
"When you buy from a mail order 
house you can't be in the latest style. 
They make up their catalogue in the 
very early Spring. You know how 
styles suddenly spring up. A gar- 
ment is in style one month and out 
the next. It is impossible for the 
mail order house to keep up with 
these styles. They have to be con- 
servative. 

"Which do you want to be? Conser- 
vative or Stylish? 

"Come here and know you are in 
Style." 



Play up for all you are worth the 
mistakes the mail order houses n ake. 
I can well remember some of the letters 
1 had to handle.- It seemed almost im- 
possible for clerks to make the mistakes 
they did. An invalid received a child's 
tricycle, a young tfirl received an old 
lady's shawl, a housewife received a 
fumed oak dining room table to go with 
her William and Mary suite. And so 
it goes on. Every one who has traded 
at all with a mail order 'house has had 
one of these things happen to him, and 
.your cards will bring up past grievances. 
Impress upon your customers their fol- 
ly in buying with mail- order concerns 
and they will soon start trading with 
you. But remember one feeble effort 
won't do any good. What you need is a 
series of efforts, and then a follow-up 
program at least once a month. 



Where Do Parcels Go? 

Efficient Delivery is One of the Most Important Features of 

Satisfactory Store Service — Don't Neglect Research 

in This Department', It Means Money. 



ONE of the most common and wor- 
rying troubles incidental to store 
service is that of the incorrectly 
addressed package which fails to reach 
its destination, causing dissatisfaction to 
the customer and endless trouble for the 
store itself. The fault may be a minor 
one in so far as the employee responsible 
is concerned, yet the mere fact that delay 
and waste of time and labor is involved 
on both sides causes it to be regarded 
as one of the serious problems confront- 
ing the retailer. 

There are innumerable reasons to 
which such errors may be attributed, and 
in nine cases out of ten the fault is laid 
at the door of the sales clerk who wrote 
out the address. Usually the mistake 
occurs through inattention or poor hear- 
ing on the part of the clerk, who may be 
endeavoring to serve several customers 
at once or, what is worse, thinking of 
something else while taking down the 
address. The majority of such mistakes 
are due to provokingly simple causes, 
such as the mistaking of the number 70 
for 17, as, happened recently and resulted 
in a large order of blankets which were 
required immediately for shipping to 
England, to go astray, and consequently 
they missed the steamer and had to be 
traced, identified by the store, and re- 
shipped to England prepaid, the whole 
matter involving a considerable loss. 

As most stores do not deliver until late 
in the day, such errors are therefore not 
discovered until at least twenty-four 
hours later. When the complaint depart- 
ment get to work on the matter it may 



happen that the delivery in question has 
left for the day, which entails another 
delay, and if the customer lives at a 
long distance, it may be several days be- 
fore the parcel is finally delivered to the 
right address. All this is, of course, 
very injurious to the reputation of the 
store in so far as ~ service is concerned^ 
In such cases the customer is apt to 
come directly to the store with her com- 
plaint and is seldom ever satisfied unless 
the sales staff responsible for her pur- 
chase are thoroughly questioned and the 
matter investigated from A to Z. 

Faulty hearing and illegible writing 
are not, however, the only causes for such 
errors of omission. Unfortunately, the 
labels provided for the addresses of par- 
cels are frequently of inferior quality or 
of such a size as to necessitate very 
cramped writing to get in the entire ad- 
dress. If the label gets smudged or dirty 
from rain or snow, the delivery man 
often takes a chance if the address has 
become somewhat illegible and does not 
wait to ascertain if a purchase is ex- 
pected from the store in question. He 
frequently throws the parcel into the 
porch and drives off at breakneck speed, 
whereas a few minutes spent in verify- 
ing the address would save hours of in- 
vestigation later. Such errors as the- 
above are apt to occur even in the store 
itself when the superscription on the 
parcel has been carelessly handled so 
that the delivery department has to send' 
the parcel back to be identified. This is. 
too frequently a cause of delay. 
(Continued on page 125) 



J32 



Dry Goods Review 



Locks the Doors on Opening Day 

Peterborough Stampedes to "La Mode, Limited" — Jack McNabb, One-time Display Man, 
Opens Smart Specialty Shop and Finds That he Can't Keep the Crowd Back — 

Windows the Eyes of His Store. 




"La Mode Ltd.," of Peterborough, viewed from the entrance. 



THE contribution of effective win- 
dow display to successful mer- 
chandising is illustrated in the 
recent opening in Peterborough of "La 
Mode, Limited." 

"La Mode" is a smart specialty shop, a 
type of store patronized by the exclusive 
trade in large cities; and although an 
innovation as far as Peterborough is 
concerned, has already acquired a very 
enviable clientele among the fashion de- 
votees of the town. The man who will 
risk a specialty shop on an elegant scale 
must know his business and his town. 
"Jack" McNabb, who is "La Mode, Lim- 
ited," knows both. He is on intimate 
terms with Peterborough and he knows 
the dry goods business like his A, B C's. 
Furthermore, and most important, he is 
a graduate from the window display de- 
partment. These- men — growing scarcer 
day by day — who are not afraid to serve 
their apprenticeship, seldom miss any 
of the real joy in life and certainly they 
have themselves to blame if they miss 
success in the business world. Jack Mc- 
Nabb has missed nothing — he didn't try 
to miss the bottom rung in the ladder 
leading to success, and it is the fact 
that he didn't even expect to jump any 
of the steps in between the lowest rung 
and the top of the ladder that makes the 
story of his climb from apprenticeship 
to ownership such an interesting one. 



His First Job. 

In 1905 J. A. McNabb applied for a 
job in the window display department of 
the Robert Simpson Company, Limited, 
of Toronto. He was accepted and for 




Mr. "Jack" McNabb 



five years he worked with a will and with 
the idea of "getting somewhere." His 
idea was no idle dream, for at the end 
of that time Richard Hall and Son, Ltd., 
of Peterborough thought enough of it to 
make "Jack" their advertising manager. 
Up until the outbreak of war and after 
he returned from overseas Mr. McNabb 
occupied this position with the Hall firm. 
But the realization that his business 
career had been interrupted and like- 
wise retarded by his service in the Great 
War did not convey any "take-it-easy- 
for-a-while" idea to the energetic ex- 
window display man and ex-C.E.F. man 
— Jack McNabb. He signed up with the 
business ranks again early in 1918, fin- 
ally resigning from Richard Hall and 
Son in October, 1920, allowing himself 
exactly one month in which to prepare 
for the opening of his own business. 
This is what early training and a culti- 
vated taste for hard work can accom- 
plish. And this is Jack McNabb's way of 
admitting what he owes to the days back 
in 1905 when he became one of the 
juniors carrying merchandise into a show 
window for the other fellow to arrange. 

Bright Eyes. 

"My windows are the eyes of my shop 
and they receive very close attention. 
Each window is changed three times a 
week and I show only very little mer- 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



.->:>> 



chandise in each, handling it in an artis- 
tic way, at the same time in an appeal- 
ing fashion, so that it cannot fail in its 
message to the passerby. I consider my 
windows my very best and most valuable 
advertising asset." 

As will be noted in Mr. McNabb's 
diagram sketch, the window front of "La 
Mode, Limited," is very novel in design 
and is working overtime night it rid day. 
Even if it were not already known to 
the trade that Mr. McNabb is a graduate 
from the ranks of the display men and 
that in 1913-14 he had beer, president of 
the Canadian Association of Display Men 
the secret would be out. with the first 
glimpse of his store front in the La 
Mode shop, for from all the points of 
view in the game of selling and display 
the layout is, like ths merchandise be- 
hind the gleaming plate glass, le dernier 
cri. 

Had to Hold Crowds Back. 

It can well be imagined that if the 
windows, as Mr. McNabb states, are the 
eyes of the store the interior of the new 
shop is well worth a visit, and the goods 
there displayed a credit to their attrac- 
tive surroundings. The fact remains that 
when "La Mode, Limited," did make its 
formal bow on the first day of December, 
1920, a stampede of the fair sex almost 
resulted. For several days following the 
rush kept up and it almost looked as 
though the sales staff would never have 
time to sell anything. 

The opening was conducted under the 
most unfavorable weather conditions, 
yet on two or three occasions during the 
first week that the store was opened 
would-be purchasers were literally 
locked out! 

"We simply had to lock the doors and 
prevent any more customers coming in 
on these occasions," declared Mr. Mc- 
Nabb. "It became almost impossible for 
the sales staff to move around, let aione 
attend to customers who were in the 
market to buy." 

Lovely Models Carried. 

Once inside this shop it must be con- 
ceded that the one-time junior display 
man and erstwhile advertising manager 
has some merchandise. 

"We are offering a very neat, stylish 
and snappy line of merchandise at mod- 
erate prices," stated Mr. McNabb, in re- 
ply to a question regarding stocks. "And 
we are specializing in novelty dresses, 
suits, coats, blouses and skirts. 

"I have set out to specialize in five 
lines that are of the highest interest to 
women and young misses, and I have 
given my closest attention and care to 
the selection of the stock carried, with 
the aim of giving and offering excep- 
tional values and a wide range of styles 
for my customers to choose from. 

"I believe that in Peterborough, as in 
the larger cities, there is a demand for 
a specialty shop for ladies' wear, and 
since opening for business I am now 
convinced that my contention was right. 
With the compactness of my merchan- 



*- V 



3/rrt 



f/li,.„ 



V- 



Ent ranee 



to 



St 



i 
ore 



-*/'— -t 



-*/t 6 .„ 



</" 



Plan of Window 



dise arrangements, with conveniences for 
fitting, customers can be readily shown 
the full line in any department." 

"Customers Must Be Satisfied." 

The business policy of "La Mode, Lim- 
ited," is characteristic of the thorough- 
going business man who owns the shop. 
"The customer must be satisfied" is the 
store watchword, and the "looker" re- 
ceives the same courteous attention as 
the "buyer," and in treating customers 
in this way each and every one who en- 
ters the shop leaves as a talking adver- 
tisement. Only first-grade merchandise 
is carried, no credit accounts are being 



opened, and no merchandise is sent out 
on approval. 

Convenient Arrangement. 

As to lay-out the store is almost ideal. 
When a customer comes in to look she 
is taken directly to the merchandise that 
she wants to see, and it is shown to her, 
and while the merchandise is being 
shown the customer, the salesgirl and 
the merchandise are all together. The 
salesgirl does not leave the customer be- 
cause she has the merchandise directly 
before her — and all she has to do is to 
endeavor to interest the customer in 
some model, then move to the fitting 
room, and have the dress tried on, and 
the sale generally follows. 

No tables or counters are used, a 
policy which justifies itself in the fact 
that the sales staff, when showing mer- 
chandise to customers, are compelled, 
after showing the merchandise, to hang 
it up, instead of throwing it over tables 
to be creased and mussed, and rendered 
less attractive for the next customer who 
may inspect it. 

Decorative Scheme Dainty. 

The color scheme of the interior of 
this smart ladies' wear show is a delight 
to the eye, and will more than satisfy 
the fastidious taste of customers who 
believe in environment when it comes to 
matters of dress. The general effect of 
the interior is emphasized in cafe-au- 
lait and grey. The walls and draperies 
are in the buff tone, while the fixtures 
and other accessories are in the grey. 
There is a cosy atmosphere about the 
Continued on Page 58. 




The costume wardrobes of "La Mode Ltd." 



o4 



Dry Goods Review 



Future Prices Depend on Labor 

Unanimous Opinion of Wholesalers and Manufacturers -Raw Material Prices Have Hit 
Bottom — Confidence Gaining Strength and Business Generally is Improved — Prices 
Firm, and Some Advances Shown — "Sentiment is Better." 



CONFIDENCE i- gaining strength in nearly every 
of the dry goods trade. "Sentimenl is a good 
deal better than a month ago," said one very con- 
servative wholesaler; "and that is half the battle," 

echoed another man. equally conservative. Business 
in nearly all lines is Wetter than it was a month ago; 
in some lines there is a very marked improvement. 
Orders that are being placed by the retail trade from 
one end of the country to the other indicate that mer- 
chant- have pretty well cleared their shelves of goods 
and are ready to go back into the market for their 
immediate requirements. There is no wild orgy of buy- 
ing. The time for that is passed, perhaps for a good 
many years to come. The buying is decidedly careful 
and consistent, giving evidence of the fact that mer- 
chants are going to work themselves hack to normal 
business conditions step by step with both eyes wide 
open. In some lines there is already a scarcity, which, 
in all probability, is only temporary because there have 
been many order- for the same lines from all over the 
country. We know of one line where a manufacturer 
has refused further orders until Fall because he is 
booked for all lie can handle. That is the exception 
rather than the rule, hut it is the hand writing on the 
wall, indicating that things are coming back by the 
-low and sure process which leads to normal times again. 
Prices, for the most part, remain unchanged from 
a month ago. They have become firm in most lines. 
Slight advances are noted in an odd line that has had 
a particular run, hut it is the working of the inexorable 
Jaw of supply and demand, and the situation is liEely 
to he quickly relieved. What the future of prices .is 
depends upon developments in labor circles; that is the 
unanimous view of the men in the manufacturing and 
the wholesale trade. So far as the raw material is con- 
cerned, the price has hit the bottom; if labor is willing 
or forced to take a lower wage, prices may drop still 
lower. In the great woollen industries in the old land 
is yet no disposition on the part of labor to accept 
this lower wage. Hence it is that woollen lines are 
showing the leasl downward tendency of all dry goods 
and the buying in woollens is not heavy, though 
there is a much hetter feeling in this end of the trade. 

SILKS 

Un- silk men have the most optimistic story, per- 
haps, of all line- of dry goods. During the last two 
weeks they say they have done a big business; in some 
lines it ha- been even better than during the days of 



the great rush of a year or eighteen months ago. Houses 
handling European lines say, unfortunately, that their 
run is mostly on taffetas and that there i- a growing 
shortage of these lines. ' Browns, grays and navy blue- 
are going strong. One house that handles many 
European lines sent in a repeat order during the week 
for a line they had handled and were told that the price 
had advanced 12% per cent, over the previous week. 
On goods that have to be contracted for this is the gen- 
eral condition; what drops there are in prices now are 
more due to distressed goods than any other cause. The 
only houses willing to operate at a loss are those that 
still have heavy stocks on hand and want to get rid of 
them. It is reported that the American houses are buy- 
ing heavily in the European market because they can 
get immediate delivery of the goods which they seem 
unable to get in their own country. 

Japanese silks are now quite firm in prices and local 
houses have been doing a big business in these lines. 
Manufacturers are in the market for their requirements 
and are buying quite freely. Waist manufacturers whose 
orders during the past year have not been too heavy are 
doing a good business. Prices on some lines of Japanese 
silks that were paid a week ago cannot be repeated at 
the same figure this week. The run on certain lines has 
been greater than it was even a year ago. Wholesalers 
report that their orders indicate that retail business is 
good ; mail order houses are booking good orders. 

STAPLE COTTONS 

There have been no further reductions in prices of 
staple cottons since the sixth of January and the result 
has been that there is a decided improvement in the 
movement of these lines. Some of the Canadian mills 
are working night and day and wholesalers state that 
they are behind with their deliveries in certain lines. 
One of the big Canadian mills withdrew one of their 
lines a few days ago, stating that they were unable to 
accept further orders till Fall. Wholesalers are asking 
for deliveries of several other lines of staple cottons but. 
as yet, are unable to get them. The orders coming in 
to the whole-ale houses indicate clearly that the trade 
throughout the country has allowed stock to get down 
to the lowest point before going into the market for more 
goods. Their buying, at present, is very conservative 
hut the sum total of it during the last two weeks has 
been very encouraging to the wholesale men. Buyers 
are silenl as to the prospects for further reductions in 
prices. They are convinced, however, that further re- 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



ductions will depend upon the attitude of labor and 
labor's reward. 

WOOLLEN DRESS GOODS 

There is some slight revival of buying in woollen 
dress goods lines but merchants arc buying very care- 
fully. Wholesalers are convinced that their stocks arc 
low and they arc not urging that the retailer buy heavily 
at this time. There is still some uncertainty with regard 
to the future of prices in these lines, dependent mostly 
on tin wages that are to he paid throughout the woollen 
industries in England. Wholesalers, themselves, are 
carrying heavy stocks and are not going into the Euro- 
pean market, as usual, to buy any considerable quantities. 

Tricotines arc and have been in heavy demand while 
serges, gabardines and broadcloths are good. 

COTTON WASH GOODS 

The last six weeks have seen the shelves of wholesale 
houses pretty well reduced in their quantities of cotton 
wash goods. Orders from all over the country have 
come in very freely and the amount of business done in 
actual yardage exceeds, in some cases, that of a year ago. 
Wholesalers attribute this to two causes: Merchants 
were hungry for goods and prices are lower. So far as 
cash returns are concerned, wholesalers say they will not 
be as great as last year but that the volume of business 
is better. In prints, ginghams, galateas, etc., there has 
been some difficulty in meeting the demands of the trade, 
and shipments have no sooner come in from the Cana- 
dian mills than they have gone out again to the retailer. 
One large wholesale house recently withdrew its Cana- 
dian ginghams because their allotment had been entirely 
sold up. They complain of the inability of the Canadian 
mills to give them all the goods they want. Prints are 
in about the same position and there is likely to be a 
scarcity of these before long. Altogether, wholesalers 
express themselves as exceedingly well pleased with the 
season in wash goods. 

LINENS 

There have been some easier quotations from the 
old country markets in linen s^ods within the last few- 
weeks but wholesalers state that these are still higher 
than the prices they paid for their stocks which were 
purchased fifteen or eighteen months ago. The peak in 
linen prices had not been reached when Canadian buy- 
er.- [purchased their present stocks. 

CARPETS AND RUGS 

The Canadian carpet manufacturers recently an- 
nounced a reduction in their lines of about 15 per 
cent., covering Brussels. Wiltons, tapestries, etc. They 
have stated, further, that there will not be any more 



drops till Kail at least and probably not then. Then 
is still no drop in the English prices and the latest 
information from the other side of the water is that 
there will be no further drop this year. This means 
that domestic buying will likely be on the increase, even 
though the range may riot be as great as that which can 
be had from overseas; Local wholesaler.- state that their 
supplies of English goods, in any case, are quite heavy 

and will sec them through till the end of the year. 

In Horn- coverings, there have been no changes in 
prices since last month. There has been, however, an 
improvement in business and retailers arc beginning to 
book hand to mouth orders. Old country houses state 
that there will be no further drop in price- for the next 
six month-. 

CURTAINS AND DRAPERIES 

The last two weeks have been very busy one- in these 
lines of house furnishings. Some specially good business 
has drifted in from the far western coast, while the 
middle west and Ontario are keeping up their end very 
well. Some of the travellers on the road have sent in 
better orders than they received a year or eighteen 
months ago. There have been no further drop- in prices 
on any lines: manufacturers state that some of the lines 
are now below replacement value and that future prices 
are hound to show an upward tendency, though slight. 

LACES AND EMBROIDERIES 

Business in these lines has also improved during the 
last month. While sales are not up to what they were 
a year ago, which was an abnormal year, manufactur- 
ers' agents state that they are well up to the normal 
year's business, say, of 1913. Malines, dress nets, laces, 
embroideries, cotton nets are all moving in fairly good 
quantities. There are indications that the retail busi- 
ness has been and is good. Good orders are coming in 
from the west and the whole tendency of prices is to 
become very firm. The future of prices, so say manu- 
facturers' agents, depends on labor, and they add that 
there will have to be a considerable drop in labor costs 
in the English mills before there can be any further 
reductions in laces. Laces, by the way. are still about 
double the price that they were before the war. 

NOTIONS 

Notion houses state that their business in January 
was better than a year ago. This end of the dry goods 
trade has never felt the slump as many other lines have 
and their trade throughout has not reflected the trials 
of other sections of the trade. Merchants, however, are 
buying carefully and the staple lines are moving much 
more freely than any of the fancy lines. Bugle beads, 
ladies' belts and elastic goods are amongst the best 
sellers at the present time. 



56 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



Dry Goods Review 



Keeping the Store Staff Happy 

Ainu's Ltd., of Montreal, Create Family Spirit in Their 
Business by Providing Home Comforts and Healthful Re- 
creation for Employees — Hospital, Skating Rinks, and 
Tennis Courts Part of Scheme. 



ALWAYS placing the welfare of 
their employees above every other 
consideration, the firm of Almy's 
Limited of Montreal have recently in- 
augurated some important innovations 
in the way of improved facilities for 
their well-being. When a staff, number- 
ing many hundreds, is imbued with an 
enthusiasm and loyalty which leads one 
and all to exclaim with joyous sincerity, 
"There is nothing the store won't do for 
us if we need help," it may be safely 
said of that store that it has achieved 
those ideals of service which are com- 
monly believed to exist only in books. 

Although the idea of creating a fam- 
ily spirit among members of the sales 
staff is by no means new, it rarely hap- 
pens that pains are taken to show tan- 
gible evidence of the interest which the 
management is supposed to feel towards 
its employees. 

A social club or an annual picnic and 
dance are far too often the only effort 
made to develop that "esprit de corps" 
which is supposed to stimulate the 
workers to do better. In the case of 
Almy's Limited, "esprit de corps" does 
not define the feeling at all, being too 
formal a phrase, and reminiscent of 
military control. One might rather say . 
of their staff that they form Montreal's 
"largest family" in keeping with the 
slogan of "Montreal's largest store." 

The manner in which this comes about 
is quite simple. A representative of Dry 
Goods was privileged to visit the store 
as the guest of the staff and was taken 
in hand by the capable young floor 
manager, who presides over the moral 
and physical welfare of the girls. 

A Splendid Hospital 

"Have you seen our hospital?" she 
asked as she led the way to the eleva- 
tor. The writer replied in the nega- 
tive and was thereupon led through a 
swinging door opening off one of the 
departments, and entered the miniature 
hospital. This is one of the most com- 
plete store hospitals of its size in Canada, 
including as it does a women's ward, 
men's ward and a doctor's office and 
clinic combined. There is a resident 
physician in charge, who is assisted by 
one of the staff whenever necessary. 

The hospital is finished in gleaming 
white enamel, with Nile green walls in 
each of the wards. Large windows and 
plenty of electric light provide an even 



illumination at all times. The equip- 
ment includes several capacious lockers 
and cabinets for the various remedies 
which may be called for, a marble wash 
stand with running water, glass topped 
table and desk for the doctor, etc., be- 
sides a full range of instruments and 
utensils for the treatment of such mala- 
dies or injuries as might occur in the 
store. First aid materials are kept in 
readiness on a small table, in case of 
sudden emergency, and every possible 
facility is provided to ensure the physi- 
cal health of every single employee. 

Pay One Per Cent. 

Every possible benefit which this 
miniature hospital and its staff can con- 
fer is provided by the management, and 
the only obligation entailed upon the 
staff is the payment of 1 per cent, of 
their salary per month. If serious ill- 
ness overtakes a sales clerk or other 
employee, the management provides 
medical attention, including all medicine, 
fees and necessary delicacies, and the 
employee receives half-pay until able to 
return to work. If a specialist's ser- 
vices are called for, the store secures 
the best to be got and assumes the 
responsibility. The doctor calls as often 
as required and reports are furnished 
to the management regarding the pro- 
gress of the sufferer, who is never al- 
lowed to feel that he or she is forgotten 
or left to suffer from lack of proper 
care and real sympathy. 

In cases which come to the knowledge 
of the management, indicating a state 
of destitution or trouble of a personal 
nature in the family of any one of the 
staff, every possible help, financial or in 
kind, is provided, and a visitor is sent 
to investigate the circumstances and de- 
cide what is best to be done. An exam- 
ple of this splendid social service was 
afforded to the writer in the case of a 
poor woman with five small children, who 
was employed in a humble position in 
the store only a shore time when it was 
discovered that she was in actual want. 
Not once, but several times did the firm 
send large hampers of groceries and 
other necessaries to this woman, and 
also sent a large turkey at Christmas. 
She has not been lost sight of, and has 
only to apply to the superintendent to 
receive the help she stands in need of. 

All this is done, according to the young 
lady interviewed, in order that the staff 
shall grow to regard the store as its 



best friend, and will endeavor to do its 
best in return for any special service 
received. 

Recreations Enjoyed 

Thus Almy's Limited looks after the 
spiritual and physical well-being of its 
staff, yet goes still further, providing 
the means for improving their moral 
welfare as well. It is scarcely neces- 
sary to mention the fact that a large 
bright assembly room is put at the 
disposal of the employees and furnished 
with a fine piano, phonograph and plen- 
ty of music and records. Here after 
lunch, girls and boys wile away a half 
hour or so to the strains of the latest 
bit of jazz and many happy faces may 
be seen hurrying back to work after a 
good fox-trot. But since the opening of 
the skating rink on the roof, the dance 
hall has been forsaken by the majority. 

For the past four years the large flat 
roof of the store has been fitted up with 
two tennis courts, which have been in 
constant use and much appreciated by 
the staff, who, according to the doctor, 
have shown a surprising improvement as 
regards the number of headache and 
fatigue cases, and this he attributes to 
the opportunity of getting fresh air and 
exercise during the day. 

Daily Classes of Salesmanship 

The lack of this facility in Winter led 
the management to consider the advisa- 
bility of turning one of the courts into 
a rink as soon as cold weather came on, 
and so the transformation was made. 
Skating is easily first in popularity at 
present, and the assembly hall is almost 
deserted, excepting for the classes in 
salesmanship, which are carried on» 
every morning by the educational de- 
partment. The great value of these 
facilities, it was pointed out, lies in the 
fact that they not only add to the 
health and contentment of the em- 
ployees, but are a common meeting 
place for the entire staff, from the gen- 
eral manager to the youngest parcel girl 
and tend to increase still further the 
spirit of co-operation among all ranks. 
One had only to watch the whirling skat- 
ers as they circled round and round the 
rink, and to notice their laughing faces 
and hear the happy voices to realize the 
immense value of wholesome sport or 
fun in the course of a day's work. 

Several times during the course of the 
year the management holds a dance or 
other entertainment for the staff, to 
which friends may be invited, and for 
which an orchestra is provided. 

After having seen all the various 
forms of recreation, etc., provided, it was 
quite easy to believe the expressions of 
enthusiasm and affection freely uttered 
by different members of the staff. No 
more valuable "reserve" could be estab- 
lished by any business on a large scale, 
in its endeavor to strengthen its posi- 
tion, than the practice of this Simple 
Christianity, otherwise known by the 
title of social service. 



Dry Gaods Review 



57 



Prices For Spring, 1921 

Canadian Merchants Face Promising Season — Wholesalers and Retailers Chose to Write 

Off Losses in One Stock — Splendid Response to New Price Levels — Special Sales 

Move Heavy Stocks — Orders Commenced to Flow. 



THE marks of trade depression are 
fading away all over the Do- 
minion. Talk of the "business 
slump" has given place to the discussion 
of plans for Spring business, and reports 
from the West, the East and points be- 
tween show that the outlook is much 
better than might have been expected 
a few months back, when uncertainty 
marked the trade. For one thing, price 
reductions have accomplished their goal 
— stocks are moving, and orders are be- 
ing placed, and the result is good cheer 
and a better feeling all 'round. Cana- 
dian wholesalers and Canadian mer- 
chants who wisely chose to take the jump 
•without delay are already reaping the 
reward of sane, brisk action. The policy 
of marking down merchandise to new 
levels has been pretty generally adopted 
and the result has been healthy. 

Those who have been obliged to take 
big cuts in the wholesale field report 
that they have written off their losses at 
ihe very outset of the new year, and 
re-marked goods so that no further re- 
ductions will have to be made. 

"We have written off $250,000," stated 
one big manufacturing concern to Dry 
Goods Review, "and our prices are now 
as low as they will be. If there is any 
change it will be an upward tendency, 
and we know now that while we have 
taken this big loss we are through with 
price-citing and are clear of any fur- 
ther trouble. If we had decided to take 
our loss gradually instead of all at once 
we should have been continually re- 
marking out goods and confusion and 
inconvenience would have been the in- 
evitable result. As it is, we know now 
where we are at, and we are confident 
of good business ahead." 

Action — Quick Readjustment. 

As far as Dry Goods Review can as- 
certain losses in Canadian retail houses 
have been written off without upsetting 
the merchants' financial security. It 
cost one Ontario dry goods firm $160,000 
to bring their prices into line with re- 
placement values. 

"Do you believe that merchants gen- 
erally are making the necessary price 
reductions?" the head of this firm was 
asked. 

"We can only speak from oar own ex- 
perience," was the reply. "We have 
not hesitated to make the necessary 
price reductions in all departments of our 
store. We completely re-marked our 
stock at the beginning of the year, and 
as a result business has been very good. 
Our stocks are moving at a most grati- 
fying pace at the new levels." 



Improvement Already. 

Other merchants interviewed reported 
similar response to the new prices, which 
it is estimated have succeeded in reduc- 
ing stocks from 10 to 50 per cent. Stores 
universally report brisk trade, and the 
result is naturally that the wholesalers 
are beginning to receive a very fair flow 
of moderate' orders. 

AH Departments Affected 

One of the leading Western Ontario 
retail houses reports that they have gone 
through every department in the store 
and repriced every item with regard to 
the price at which it could now be 
bought. A complete survey of the stocks 
was made at the end of the firm's fiscal 
year, .January 31. 

"We had, however, not left this re- 
pricing entirely until that date," de- 
claimed the general manager of the firm. 
"In very many cases during the previous 
month or six weeks we had reduced 
prices to correspond with new goods 
coming in. In my opinion any merchant 
who is still endeavoring to get prices 
based on the cost of goods to him some 
months ago is on the wrong track." 

This merchant further stated that the 
lines affected in price covered practically 
every department, to a greater or less 
extent, and believed that those depart- 
ments which had only experienced a very 
slight reduction would be subject to fur- 
ther declines. 

Stiffening Tendency 

It is equally true, however, that in 
some lines a decided stiffening in prices 
is already being noticed, notably in the 
millinery and silk trades. The raw silk 
market is firming up to a marked degree 
and the reports from Yokohama, Can- 
ton, Shanghai and Milan state the mar- 
kets to be active and firm. 

This improvement in the silk market 
is reflected in a healthier state through- 
out the whole dry goods field; and, the 
fact that wholesale travelers are now 
reporting fair business shows that there 
was a wisdom in adopting, without hesi- 
tation, the price reduction policy. In 
this way goods are now being placed in 
the hands of the consumer at a fair 
value based on replacement cost, plus a 
fair profit to the merchant. . 

In Montreal. 

Montreal retailers recently interviewed 
give it as their opinion that prices exist- 
ing at the present time on some lines are 
now down 50 per cent, from the peak of 
high values reached last April and May. 

The question of prices is a thorny one 



to the managers of the large Quebec 
stores, who are averse to any discussion 
upon the subject other than to comment 
upon the uncertainty of any further cuts 
being possible. It seems likely that 
prices have about settled on bed-rock, 
as one manager put it, and that the next 
movement of any importance will be an 
upward one. This would seem to apply 
in a special way to the various articles 
of ready-to-wear, since stocks in the 
hands of retailers are rapidly diminish- 
ing as a result of the steady run of 
January sales, which are just over. 

In any case, the general opinion of the 
various retailers interviewed in the East 
was to the effect that the prices of raw 
materials had not dropped as low as the 
finished products, when the various in- 
gredients included in the manufacture 
of the latter were taken into considera- 
tion. Much evidence was furnished upon 
this point, which showed that depart- 
mental stores have of late suffered much 
loss in their efforts to bring prices down 
to an attractive level. One of the man- 
agers stated emphatically that the price 
of many articles to-day on sale in his 
store was below the cost of the raw 
material. To illustrate this point, com- 
parative lists were brought out dealing 
with certain standard lines. These 
showed plainly enough the price cuts 
made in recent months, as in the follow- 
ing example: 

Present price. May,1920 

Standard shirts (68 x 

70 cloths) $1.69 $ 3.00 

Blankets 3.98 10.00 

Silk gloves 1.00 1.75 

Silk hosiery (full 

fashioned) 2.50 5.25 

Bed sheeting 2.98 6.50 

Aluminum tea kettles 3.49 5.00 
Floor oilcloth (per 

yard) 79 1.25 

Sales Relieve Situation. 

Still other managers illustrate their 
argument by statements of almost stag- 
gering losses in the footwear and silk 
wear departments, which in two occa- 
sions reached the figure of $5,000 a day. 
But these big losses are cheerfully ac- 
cepted as incidental to the business and 
according to the managers such setbacks 
are regarded as only temporary. They 
believe, furthermore, that the all-round 
clearance sales which are now drawing 
to a close will have a tonic effect upon 
business in Montreal and shortly make 
for better times. The fact that practi- 
cally all distress sales of merchandise 

Continued on page 58 



5S 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



Dry Goods Review 



Announcing Reductions by 
Mail: Methods of Sample 

Bros, and Begg & Co. 

How Firms With Big Mailing Lists Tell Their Customers of Price 

Reductions — The Use of the Editorial 

Type of Advertising 

M 



ERCHANTS who have large 
mailing lists are not only us- 
ing them extensively during 
their readjustment period, hut it is in- 
teresting to see just how they are using 
them to make announcements of lower- 
priced merchandise and the cause for 
the same. There are some retailers who 
view the type of newspaper advertising 
that is ordinarily used during a sales 
period with considerable disfavor and, 
consequently, resort to more conserva- 
tive methods of reaching their patrons. 
A class of advertising that has been 
used with considerable effect during the 
last six or eight months is that which 
has become known as the editorial type. 
For instance, Lord & Taylor, the ultra- 
fashionable departmental store of New 
York, recently used this style in making 
it known to the public that the price 
of their merchandise had undergone a 
revision downwards in view of replace- 
ment values. They made it very em- 
phatic in this editorial advertisement 
that they were not conducting a sale; 
the point they drove home was that 
merchandise was cheaper and that it 
could be bought cheaper at Lord & 
Taylor's. 

Sample Bros., of Kerrobert 

On January 1 Sample Bros., of Ker- 
robert, Saskatchewan, sent out a very 
conservatively composed letter to their 
customers. It is worth quoting: 
"Dear Customer: — 

"Price readjustment to a lower scale 
cannot be made without losses. 

"Prices have turned downward; raw 
materials are at a lower level, and the 
producer of these materials is only re- 
ceiving a fraction of the peak prices 
which he has, heretofore, been receiving. 

"Manufacturers are revising their 
prices downward, and the retailer must 
bear a share of the losses, too, in the 
general downward trend. We are tak- 
ing our losses now, believing our first 
loss will be the least; and our patrons 
may buy with the fullest confidence that 
they are receiving a square deal at 
Sample Bros., for we are taking every 
actual price reduction on our present 
stock on hand just as fast as we learn 
of them. In sharing these readjustment 
losses you will expect us to reduce our 
prices regardless of profit, but you can 
understand it will be necessary for us 
to place our business on a stricter cash 
basis. 



"We will still continue our thirty-day 
account basis but when accounts are not 
paid within fifteen days after rendering, 
ten per cent, interest per annum will be 
added. This will be strictly ^adhered to, 
as you can quite understand where little 
or no profit is being taken it would be 
impossible for us to do otherwise. 

"We feel confident you will appreciate 
our efforts to assist in bringing down 
the H. C. of L. and will give us your 
generous support as in the past. 

"Yours for better and bigger busi- 
ness." 

Begg & Co., of Hamilton 

Begg & Co., Ltd., of Hamilton, in 
announcing "The One Big Sale of the 
Year," in which every article in the 
store was reduced from 25 to 50 per 
cent., make this announcement in a per- 
sonal letter through the mails. It runs: 

"Unusual conditions must be met by 
unusual methods — we have something 
unusual to announce. 

"You, no doubt, are one of many men 
who have been well fed during the past 
year on so-called sale propaganda. We 
believe that thinking men are not misled 
by loud newspaper talk. We have not 
felt it advisable to use hysterical meth- 
ods to stampede you into purchasing 
during this period, but have persistently 
carried on a systematic policy of giving 
our customers the benefit of current 
prices. 

"The warm, unseasonable weather of 
the past month has left us with un- 
usual stocks of clothing, furnishings, 
hats and shoes. This, coupled with the 
fact that in the very near future our 
plans call for a complete rearrangement 
of our stocks, as we purpose adding two 
big new departments to our store, 
has forced us to take very drastic 
measures in order to reduce our stock 
by one-half." 



PRICES FOR SPRING 

Continued from page 57 

are finished is considered a good augury 
for better times in the near future. 

Summarizing the position in the re- 
tail stores of Montreal, it can be stated 
that the heads are pretty much in agree- 
ment on the major points. They assert 
that they have been doing their full share 
in reducing prices; that a comparison 
of their lists for December and now will 
bear this out; that frequent heavy cuts 
have been made since last Summer on 



practically all articles in common use; 
that stocks are now being rapidly re- 
duced and that upon this question of 
rapidly reducing stocks depends the suc- 
cess of the manufacturer and the whole- 
saler. 

"In many cases," said one man, "our 
prices are away below the cost of pro- 
duction." 

"It would be ridiculous as well as un- 
fair," said another merchant, "to charge 
us with a failure to meet replacement 
values. Not only have we done so on 
an ample scale, but our conservative 
methods of purchase and sale have clone 
much to stabilize trade in this city." 

Montreal wholesalers are of the 
opinion that they are deserving of much 
credit in this matter of price reduction 
also. 

It seems pretty well established Miat 
the wholesale dry goods merchants car- 
rying general lines as well as those deal- 
ing in specialties have, when taking 
stock in December, reduced their sup- 
plies by offering discounts of 25 and 30 
per cent, on the price of all staple cot- 
ton, silk and woollen goods; and they 
report a marked accession of orders as 
a consequence. 



LOCK THE DOORS ON OEPNING 
DAY 

Continued from page 53 
whole place that makes for the comfort 
and convenience of the customer the 
minute she enters the store. The polished 
hardwood floors are relieved by various 
sized rugs of attractive and harmonious 
colorings, while a relief note is pro- 
vided in the decorative scheme by the 
presence of brass hooks and mounts used 
for the effective display of cert^Pi mer- 
chandise. 

The blouse department, as will be 
seen in the accompanying views of the 
store, is forward on the right side, the 
wardrobe containing the suit, costumes, 
coats and frocks stands prominently on 
the left side, while situated behind the 
staircase are three splendidly equipped 
private fitting rooms, well lighted, fitted 
with triple mirrors, a chair and a pretty 
matching rug. A very excellent altera- 
tion room is situated upstairs and the 
work in this department is done free of 
charge. - . 

Secret of Success. 

"Since opening here business has been 
splendid," admitted Mr. McNabb, "and I 
am very optimistic over the outlook for 
Spring trade. I feel that when it opens ■ 
the merchants all over Canada will enjoy 
a very prosperous season." 

Dry Goods Review seconds the motion 
and feels sure that the whole trade will 
extend good luck wishes to Jack Mc- 
Nabb, who has demonstrated his ability 
to work for others and by doing so has 
placed himself in a position where he 
is now able to render first-class service 
to his customers by working for himself. 



Dr>i Goods Review 



59 



Styles for Season of 1921-22 to be Conservative 

Canadian Designers Believe Merchants Want Garments That Guarantee Safe Turn- 
over — International Convention Cut Down on Form-Fitting Styles — Some 

Models Are Outlined. 



WHILE the style forecast adopted 
by the style committee of the 
International Association of 
Clothing Designers recently held in Chi- 
cago announces that the tendency for 
Fall and Winter is toward the liberal use 
of garments expressing more individual- 
ity and that hence there will be a de- 
mand for all types of sport and novelty 
effects in suits and overcoats, the feel- 
ing amongst Canadian designers with 
whom Dry Goods Review has talked 
is that conservatism will again feature 
in the Fall and Winter creations, 1921-22. 
There will, of course be a sprinkling of 
novelties for the young men who seek 
the extremes in dressing, but these are 
likely to be few. As one designer put 
it, "While the style tendency as ex- 
pressed at the Chicago Convention was 
toward several extremes, in Canada we 
will follow much more conservative 
lines." Or as another designer said, 
"One may say that the style tendency in 
Canada for the coming Fall and Winter 
season will be decidedly conservative; 
there will be very little that is new or 
extreme." 

Taking Note of Conditions 
The reasons for the conservatism of 
the Canadian designer are, perhaps, ob- 
vious. In the first place, Canadian 
styles are always more conservative 
than those across the line. There is 
neither the number of people nor the 
cosmopolitan population that can absorb 
the extremes in styles in this country as 
in the United States. An extreme style 
across the border that dies on the manu- 
facturer's shelves can be unloaded much 
more easily than in Canada. 

And this constitutes one of the main 
reasons, if not the main reason, why few 
extremes will figure in the coming Fall 
and Winter program. "Merchants the 
country over are not in an attitude of 
mind to invest their money in styles 
that will die," is the way one clothing 
manufacturer expressed himself to Dry 
Goods Review; while another said: "To 
keep down the price for Fall to where the 
average merchant wants it, fancy yokes, 
lines and trimmings will have to be for- 
gotten." Note is being taken of the 
times in designing the Fall and Winter 
styles. Travelers on the road these 
days with clothing are being asked very 
frequently: "What is your lowest line?" 
The clothing manufacturer has taken 
note and will give a good, conservative 
style, having all the essentials of a 
highly tailored garment, but with the 
frills missing. He knows that the mer- 
chant does not want to carry any "dead" 
stock; so he is trying to figure out styles 
that will always make his stock saleable, 



with a sprinkling of the extremes that 
will not interrupt rapid turnover. 
Styles for Men's Models 

The forecast of the style committee 
at Chicago with regard to the specifi- 
cations for men's models based on size 
37 are: 

Style, three button sack, waist length 
17 inches, full length 30 inches; blade 
effect, clean; back effect, slightly body 
tracing; back finish, 8 inch plain vent; 
shoulder width 5 inches and effect 
square; lapel, low gorge, notch, dimen- 
sions 3% inches; cutaway front, with 
corners slightly rounded and button 
spacing 1 inch above the lower pocket; 
front effect, medium chest; regulation 
style of pockets, located 11 inches; 
sleeve size is 18 inches at elbow and 11 
inches at hand, with open vent. 
Young Men's Models 
Based on size 36 for semi-young men: 
waist length 17 inches, full length 30% 
inches, with easy blade effect; back effect 
is broad at blade to medium waist sup- 
pression and close clinging at seat; no 
vent in back; shoulder width 4% inches 
with square effect; lapel, low gorge with 
notch with 3% inch dimensions; slightly 
cutaway with rounded corners and but- 
ton spacing 1 inch about the lower 
pocket; full chest front effect; regula- 
tion style of pocket, location 11 inches; 
sleeve size 14 % at elbow and 10% at 
hand with open vent. 

In a three button sack for young men 
based on the same size, the waist length 
is given as 16 inches with full length 
30% inches, with blade effect, easy; back 
effect is form fitting with denned waist 
lines, a 12 inch hook vent; shoulder 
width 4% inch, square with slight pleat 
effect in sleeve head; low gorge, notch 
lapel, dimensions 3% inches; slightly 
cutaway front and full chest; regulation 
pockets, location 10 inches; sleeve size 
14% inches at elbow and 10% inches at 
hand, with open vent. 

ONE BUTTON SACK: — General 
specification for young men's sack with 
peaked lapel and slightly slanting flap 
pockets. 

TWO BUTTON SACK:— Specifications 
for young men's three button sack, with 
semi-peaked lapel. 

FOUR BUTTON SACK:— Specifica- 
tions for semi-young men's sack, with 
short lapel, high gorge, soft roll; plain 
vent 8 inches; plain pockets. 

TWO BUTTON DOUBLE BREASTED 
SACK. — Specifications for young men's 
single breasted sack, with buttons four 
inches from edge, 4% inches apart, and 
lower button 1 inch above pocket. 

THREE BUTTON DOUBLE 
BREASTED SACK:— Specifications for 



young men's single breasted sack with 
buttons 4% inches from edge and lower 
button on line with pocket. 

FOUR BUTTON DOUBLE BREAST- 
ED SACK: — Specifications for young 
men's sack, with buttons 4 inches from 
edge, lower button 1 inch below pocket. 
YOUNG MEN'S TROUSERS:— Cuff 
bottom, 17% inches at knee and 14% 
at bottom; plain bottoms, 18 inches at 
knee and 15 inches at bottom. 

MEN'S VESTS:— Five buttons, no 
collar; for young men, six buttons, low 
opening. 

ONE BUTTON FROCK COAT:— 
Waist length 16% inches; full length 
38% inches; flat braided; sharp cutaway; 
peak or notch lapel; coat for semi-dress 
and to be worn with striped trousers. 

MEN'S TUXEDOS.— Specifications of 
men's sack, with silk faced peak lapel 
and flap pockets; and for young men, 
specifications of young men's three but- 
ton sack, with notch collar; the collar, 
lapel and cuffs of silk; satin welt breast 
pockets. 

MEN'S FULL DRESS COAT:— Waist 
length 17 inches, full length 40 inches; 
natural shoulder; silk faced peak lapel; 
bound collar; for young men, 16% inches 
waist length, 40 inches full length; skirt 
effect narrow and pointed notched col- 
lar; collar, lapel and cuffs of silk; 
breast pocket, welt bound. 

Styles in Overcoats 
MEN'S CHESTERFIELD:— Length 
42 inches; velvet collar; regulation pock- 
et, and vent. 

MEN'S THREE BUTTON DOUBLE 
BREASTED: — Length 41 inches; regu- 
lation pockets; lines to follow men's 
sack, and for young men, length 40 
inches, follow general lines of young 
men's sacks; velvet collar; velvet piped 
cuff, and hook vent. 

ULSTERETTE:— Three button double 
breasted; waist length 17 inches; full 
length 43 inches; back effect loose, well 
drawn in by belt, one-piece three quarter 
belt; deep hook vent, effect of front 
form fitting; lower button two inches 
below pocket line; pocket 11 inches 
below arm hole; patch and flap pockets. 
STORM ULSTER: — Four button 
double breasted, 48 inches long; patch 
pockets and flaps; two-piece back belt, 
two buttons; plain centre vent; cuff on 
sleeves. 

RAGLAN:— Three button double 
breasted, length 46 inches; large patch 
pockets; one or two piece sleeve; deep 
arm holes; belt all round; cuffs on 
sleeves; convertible collar. 

DOUBLE BREASTED SLIP-ON 
OVERCOAT:— 45 inches long, split 
sleeve with cuff; slash pockets, belt all 
round. 



60 



DRESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 



A Letter With "Real Meat" In It 



The following letter sent out by the export department of Sidney Blumenthal & Co. Inc., 
to its foreign list of customers, may prove of interest to American Manufacturers: 

Sidney Blumenthal «fc Co. Inc. 



OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF 




*> 



MANUFACTURERS OF PILE FABRICS 

395-401 FOURTH AVENUE 



TELEPHONE 
*OI60N SQUARE 125C 



CABLE ADDRESS "BOULEVARD" 
A. B C. CODE FIFTH EDITION BENTLEY 



^gSMmS&emi 



i!,.K...i, Ciiin 

Gentlemen: 



New York 



February 1st, 1921 



We believe that a misapprehension exists in many foreign countries regard- 
ing the situation in the United States at the present time . There is no panio, 
or near-panic, in this country. Leading bankers did fear some sort of 
a financial crisis during the late Summer and early Fall, when crops were 
being moved and money was in greatest demand. This crisis has passed, 
however, and the only situation now requiring careful handling is the 
finding of new normal price levels, and meeting them through a process 
of deflation. 

The slump in prices has been very general. Many items are almost down 
to pre-war levels; and others, in the opinion of many leading experts, are 
too low for present conditions. No one denies that the normal price 
levels for 1921 and the future will be considerably higher than the 
bottoms that prevailed before the war. Workers' wages have been cut 
somewhat, especially in the textile industry, but it is impossible that 
either skilled or unskilled labor will ever go down to the wages paid in 
1914. It is therefore, safe to say that the prices quoted by primary 
sources, such as manufacturers in the next few months will be a sound 
basis on which to buy. 

All lines of business have slowed up materially during the last six months, 
but it is only a temporary condition, as we have all the fundamental factors 
well developed for normal prosperity. Never in the country ' s history has there 
been so much money in the aggregate or per capita, on deposit in savings banks; 
nor has the savings per day of the population ever run so high as at present. 

As a nation we have been travelling so fast that any slight recession from 
the exaggerated activities of the past few years is exploited by the press, 
talked of by the politicians, and theorized upon by the economists--all of which 
is further featured and accentuated by the foreign press . Much of this propa- 
ganda is inspired by people with a motive and you can discount any statement 
that the United States is in a desperate situation. 

Our own prices, which have been adjusted, are now within the new normal 
range . The quotations which we make now are not based on the old cost of 
material and labor, such as prevailed during 1919 and 1920, but are figured on 
the new cost of production and our customers may feel warranted in purchasing 
without hesitation 

Very truly yours , 

SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL & CO. INC. 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



Gl 





' The ultimate choice of the prudent housewife ' 



"THE PRINT DRESS" 

SOME people believe that the 
"print dress" belongs only 
to the age of innocence and 
simplicity. But it doesn't. 

<I True, print is still the material 
from which charming, inexpen- 
sive and ever-fresh dresses may 
be made for children. But older 
members of the household are 
continually finding new ways or 
using print for their own per- 
sonal wardrobes — for decorative 
effect in house dress, garden cos- 
tume or other apparel. 

^ In "Prue Cottons" prints your 
patrons will find inspiration for 
something new, quaint and inex- 
pensive. 



DOMINION TEXTILE 

COMPANY, LIMITED 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG 



- 



lh'ii uoocts tteview 



Smart Woolens For a French Summer 

- pes Promised Much Favor, Checks Will Subside, But Plaids Will Enjoy Considerable 
Prominence— Grey is the Leader in Colors, But There Are Plenty of -Advocates of 
the Black and Navy Vogue — Soft Shades Seen in Wrap Fabrics. . 



Paris. France, 

February, L921. 

EDITOR, Dry Goods Review: Al- 
though the days "are cold, and 
dark, and dreary— it rains, and 
the wind is never weary," yet our live* 
are not dreary, for the sun is shining 
behind the clouds and within a month 
or two we shall throw aside our 
Winter clothes, to put on again lighter 
woolen fabrics, then aerial silks, mus- 
lin* of pure white or light shades, with 
ribbons and gay flowers on our hats. 
Soon we shall start making plans for 
country outings, garden parties, Summer 
holidays. As this requires much think- 
ing it is just as well to start now hav- 
ing' a look at the novelties in Summer 
materials, so as to have one's mind 
quite made up when the dressmakers 
time comes. 

Woolens for Warm Weather 

This month, I will tell you about 
woolen stuffs for Summer wear. 

From what I have seen, I should think 
that stripes will still be very fashionable, 
checks will be less in demand, while 
plaids are sure to be a prominent fea- 
ture of travelling garments ^whether 
used alone or in connection with plain 
material of the same kind. 

Of course, the shades will be light: 
apart from navy which is staple and 
more in demand (with black) than any 
other shades, we shall see all kinds of 
grey, sand, tan, beige, saxe blue, green, 
brick, etc. 

Novelty fabrics are keeping up their 
prices because they are novelties. Yet, 
there is a decline on last year's quota- 
tions, which is rather hopeful, for, while 
you still have to pay heavy prices for 
the first class articles, 'it is possible to 
get something cheaper in light serge, 
that is quite valuable still. 

For instance, the pattern No. 1 of 
thick gabardine of a corkscrew appear- 
ance is of a fairly high price, but is sure 
to be chosen by a lady who wants to 
have a neat costume of plain, but per- 
fect lines. In reseda green, beige or 
grey, it will be splendid either for walk- 
ing or for traveling. The yellowish 
grey shade will suit little girls to per- 
fection, in cloaks, or young ladies who 
are just going in for suits. 

No. 2, on the contrary, is a sample 
of pure woolen "satin de laine," light in 
weight, and moderate in price, with 
which we shall make some nice cos- 
tumes, dresses, and all kinds of Summer 
wraps. 

The glossy appearance of this mater- 



ial will win it many "suffrages," both 
amongst young ladies whose complexion 
it will brighten up, and by their mothers, 
whose youth it will remind them of, 
when broadcloth, woolen cashmere, etc., 
were only known. 

The enclosed range of patterns shows 
you that there is no lack of variety in 
the shades, and that all tastes ought to 
be satisfied. No. 3 is the continuation 
of the "bure" kind of materials that have 
been so fashionable during the past year 
or two. It may look thick for Summer 
wear, but as this season is the time 
for sports, seaside or mountain holidays, 
together with light gowns, one must 
have a few warm garments in store for 
windy days or mountain excursions in 
the everlasting snow regions. 

Elegant Fabrics 

While comfort must be thought of, 
daintiness should not be left aside, and 
the following are specimens of warm, 
yet elegant materials for such purposes: 

No. 5, a grey pattern of thick fluffy 
woolen diagonale, which can be reversed, 
will make mostly ample motoring coats. 

No. 5, a lighter grey stuff, similar to 
the former, although the ground is bure 
weaving, can be used for the same pur- 



poses as above for people who don't go 
in for fancy shades or styles. 

No. 6. is the same pattern as No. 5, 
only in light blue, such as young ladies 
will want to impart charm to their 
youthful appearance. 

No. 7, similar to No. 4, in blue and 
yellow, would suit ladies with dark hair 
and similar complexion very well. 

No. 8, in plain, or in plaid, is of a 
lovely brick red shade to be made into 
all sorts of sports and touring garments. 
The green, black and white plaid is very 
effective, yet not showy. In grey, it is 
also very pretty. Both might be used 
alone or in combination, one as the 
main part of the garment, the other as 
' trimmings. 

Novel Patterns 

In checks, or rather in square designs 
separated by colored fillete, to be made 
up also in traveling cloaks, we have: 
pattern No. 9, sand ground with beige 
fillete, or white and black. 

No. 10 is a mixture of black, sky 
blue and brown stripes, or yellow, grey 
and white, of the same kind of material. 

No. 11, in red plaid, is lovely for 
children especially when they are quite 
young, and in blue plaid, little girls' 








£V 



Soft woolen fabrics for Summer wear described in accompanying letter from Paris, 
(a) One of the splendid Scotch lines offered by Scott Bros. & Co., Hawick, Scotland. 



Dry (lands Revit w 



DRESS FABRICS 



63 



coats will also be very nice, especially if 
trimmed with green as in the stripe. 

As a matter of fact, showy shades are 
always nicer for children than for 
grown ups, for little ones require less of 
them, and besides they are generally 
pretty, and the most eccentric- thing- will, 
at the utmost, look amusing- on them, 
while it might be ridiculous on some 
women! 

Novelties in Serges 

Quite new and effective in their plain- 
ness are the three following samples of 
regular stripes shown under number 12. 
The iron grey with turquoise blue 
stripes, or the reseda green with saxe, 
or the black and brick patterns are 
equally pretty, and suitable for every- 
body, and in a good many instances. 

As I mentioned above*, navy serge 
is always in demand. Herewith are a 
few samples of fancy stripes to brighten 
up the staple serge suit: 

No. 13 has a wide stripe of green, 
yellow or white, which makes it suitable 
for straight narrow skirts with a plain 
navy jacket. 

No. 14 is the newest and most dainty 
specimen of bayadere stripe on navy 
serge. Whether these stripes be green, 
saxe, yellow and red, or white, brown, 
blue, green, or the same shades differ- 
ently displayed, all are as effective, in 
dresses and suits. 

What is peculiar about these designs 
is that such shades are nice only on navy 
ground. Others would not do so well 
and the idea should be carried exclusive- 
ly on navy serge, to be displayed best. 

Black serge is also always in great 
demand, for two reasons: many elderly 
ladies will wear nothing but black, shop 
girls, who have to be well dressed to look 
after customers are generally clad in 
black, and unfortunately, there are al- 
ways some people in mourning. 

For full mourning, black or white are 
exclusively worn, but when the* time 
comes for half mourning, then mixtures 
of black and white are adopted. 

As stripes at present are more fash- 
ionable than anything else, I am send- 
ing you enclosed three patterns of black 
and white serge suitable for above pur- 
poses: 

No. 15, a large band of black close to 
a greyish white band of the same width. 
This would make some effective pleated 
skirts, by having the white band inside 
the pleat, just to be seen when the said 
pleat opens during the walk. 

No. 16 is a bayadere design, as shown 
on navy serge, but the stripes of dif- 
ferent widths are all grey. It is effect- 
ive, too, and would look its best in full 
length coats. 

No. 17 is the pattern of grey ground 
serge, with white • stripes that is worn 
later on when mourning time is almost 
at an end. However, it would prove 
very convenient for other purposes, and 




Many stripes and checks are seen in the smart novelty woolens showing in Paris 
this season. See accompanying letter. 

for everyday costumes or dresses for collections will only be shown this; 
instance. month. 

I therefore hope to be able to tell 
As regards the lines which will pre- you , in my next letter, what was dis- 
vail next Summer, nobody knows any- played there in costumes and every 
thing certain yet, for the couturiers' other Summer garment. 




ALL FOR TEN DOLLARS 

Oi; January 15th last the formal open- 
ing of the new Montreal store of the 
R. L. Steel Company was held and a 
cordial invitation was extended to the 
women of the city to visit the lingerie, 
waist and hat shop, which forms a very 
important part of the firm's activity. 
The interior decoration of the new store 
is particularly effective, having a hard- 
wood floor, white walls and a profusion 
of hanging baskets of flowers every- 
where, while numbers of canaries trill 
and sing constantly among the flowers. 
Amid such surroundings, the newest 
Spring blouses, hats and lingeries ap- 
pear more than ordinarily fascinating, 
and the signs everywhere displayed an- 
nouncing that nothing costs above $10 
are an added inducement to feminine 
shoppers in quest of the season's latest. 



A BIRTHDAY OFFER 

The Montreal firm of Almy's Limited 
are celebrating their sixth birthday by 
a gigantic sale, commencing February 
12. As an added attraction they are 
advertising special inducement to out- 
of-town shoppers in the way of refund- 
ing railway fares in proportion to the 
amount spent at the sale. Every fifty 
cents worth purchased entitles the buyer 
to one mile of fare free, and therefore 
the sale will undoubtedly benefit those 
living at considerable distance who are 
contemplating the purchase of furniture, 
etc., which runs to higher figures. An 
extra sales staff of 250 have been en- 
gaged for the event and three to four 
full-page spreads are featured in the 
daily newspapers advertising the num- 
berless bargains. 



64 



DRESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 



Situation Unchanged in Textile Trades . 

Officer in Charge of Overseas Trade Issues Report on Developments 
in Woolen and Cotton Trades From Toronto Office. 



IN spite of the continued unfavorable 
conditions in the cotton trade, there 
is a certain feeding of optimism 
being given expression, and according to 
recent reports from the overseas trade 
commission there is good reason for this 
improved outlook. Dealing with the cot- 
ton trade in a recent summary, the of- 
ficer in charge of overseas trade in To- 
ronto reports as follows: 

Unsatisfactory conditions continue to 
obtain in this section of industry, and 
there have been no material changes 
since the last report. 

The Eastern demand for cotton piece 
goods, etc.. shows, at present, no indica- 
tion of improvement. The cables from 
India and China have for some time past 
been very disappointing, nor have other 
countries displayed any desire to in- 
crease their purchases. Sellers have 
still further reduced their prices until, 
in frequent instances, goods are offered 
at actually less than the cost price, but 
even the lower quotations do not induce 
orders, and it seems evident that, either 
because of actual inability to purchase, 
or of a determination to force still fur- 
ther reductions, buyers do not intend to 
extend their commitments at the present 
juncture. 

As a consequence, unemployment has 
been on the increase in the spinning and 
weaving branches, and the organized 
short-time working in the Egyptian sec- 
tion is to continue until, at least, well 
into the current month, while a decision 
upon this question has at last been 
reached in the American section, and in 
view of the continued growth of unem- 
ployment, organized short-time, reduc- 
ing the hours worked to 24 per week, has 
been introduced as from December 6. 

Expect Extensive Buying 

Nevertheless, there is still a spirit of 
optimism in certain quarters where it is 
believed that the continuance of these 
quiet conditions, in view of the as- 
sumption that requirements of the world 
are still so far from being filled, guar- 
antees that when once buying does re- 
commence it will be on a very extensive 
scale, and that this demand, together 
with an anticipated recovery in £he price 
for the raw material, which is at pres- 
ent, they contend, much below produc- 
tion cost and cannot long remain at the 
current level, will lead to a return of 
active and profitable trading in the not 
far-distant future. 

On the statistical position, this belief 
is not altogether unwarrantable, but the 
main factor upon which the future trade 
in this direction, as in others, most so 
largely depend is the future of the 
world's economic position and the ability 
f.f overseas buyers to finance purchases. 



Given the gradual return to more nor- 
mal economic conditions, there is good 
reason for such optimism. 

Wool 

Reporting on conditions in the woolen 
textile industry the statement says: 

Trade generally remains unsatisfac- 
tory owing to the continued scarcity of 
new orders of importance. Neverthe- 
less, there has recently appeared to be a 
little more business passing in some di- 
rections, and although this is usually 
for small lots required for immediate 
purposes and is passing at low prices, 
it appears to have imparted a somewhat 
more optimistic feeling regarding the 
near future, and there are not lacking 
those who look for a trade revival, of 
at least moderate dimensions, early in 
the new year. 

In the meantime liquidation of large 
stocks continues, and prices have in many 
instances been still fui'ther reduced. 

The following statement has been is- 
sued by the Ministry of Munitions con- 
cerning certain proposals unanimously 
adopted by a large and representative 
conference of wool growers held at Mel- 
bourne on 7th December. The proposals 
are urged by the Prime Minister of Aus- 
tralia as of vital importance to the 
sheep-raising industry of Australia. 

The operations under the Imperial 
Wool Purchase Account up to 31st 
March, 1919, were fully set forth in 
Command Paper 788, together with the 
main figures relating to the financial 
year ending March last. The profit of 
about £13,000,000 realized to 31st March, 
1919, was recently distributed, one half 
being paid to the Australian wool grow- 
ers through the Central Wool Commit- 
tee, and the other half being surrendered 
to the treasury. The profits on Aus- 
tralian wool sold after 31st March, i919, 
have been very large, and the present 
position is that all treasury advances 
for the purchase of about 7,000,000 bales 
of Australian wool in all have been re- 
paid with full interest, and substantial 
surplus assets now stand in the books 
free of cost, consisting of about 1,800,- 
000 bales of wool and a large sum in 
cash over and above all liabilities. The 
accounts up to 31st March, 1920, are 
subject to audit, but for the purposes of 
the present statement the result is 
known with sufficient accuracy. Taking 
the wool at the purchase price, plus 
transport charges when incurred, the 
surplus assets of the Australian section 
of the Wool Purchases Account are esti- 
mated to amount to about £56,000,000 
sterling. 

There being no probability in the pres- 
ent state of the wool market of an early 
disposal of the large carry-over of wool, 



the request is now made on behalf of 
the wool growers that their half share 
of the assets shall be handed over to 
them on 31st December. It is proposed 
that these assets, whose book value, as 
above stated, is about £28,000,000 ster- 
ling, shall be capitalized at £25,000,000 
sterling, and that a company shall be 
formed to be registered in Melbourne 
under the style of the British-Australian 
Wool Realization Association. It is pro- 
posed that the said capital of £25,000,- 
000 shall be divided into ordinary trans- 
ferable shares and debentures, and that 
scrip for the same shall be distributed 
amongst the wool growers as their final 
dividend under the Imperial wool con- 
tracts. It is suggested that the board 
of directors shall consist of nine direc- 
tors, of whom some will reside in Aus- 
tralia and some in London, their names 
to be submitted to the British Govern- 
ment for approval. The main object of 
the association is to be the realizations of 
the carry-over wool to the best advan- 
tage, but general trading powers will be 
taken in the articles of association. 

It is requested as a vital part of the 
scheme that the British Government 
shall hand over to the association for 
sale on agency terms the British half 
of the carry-over wool — it being under- 
stood, of course, that the British half of 
the surplus cash shall be surrendered to 
the treasury. There being very great 
difficulty in making a physical division 
of the wool, it is intended that from 31st 
December onwards the property of one 
half of every bale of wool shall be 
vested in the association and the prop- 
erty of the other half shall remain vest- 
ed in the British Government, so that 
all sales of old clip wool shall be on 
joint account, the association accounting 
to the treasury for half of the proceeds 
of every sale. 

As above stated, these important pro- 
posals are being very carefully studied 
by the Minister of Munitions. It is not 
the intention of the Minister of Muni- 
tions to recommend H.M. Government to 
adopt any course likely to lead to the 
formation of a trust or combine which 
would adversely affect the interests of 
the consumer or those of British trade. 



GOES TO CALIFORNIA 

Joseph Solomon, managing director of 
the firm of A. J. Alexandor & Co., of 
Montreal, has severed his connection with 
the company and will go to California 
to live. He was presented with a hand- 
some travelling bag by the officers and 
employees, together with many good 
wishes for his future success. 



FURRIER'S HEAVY LOSS 

A serious fire occured on January 27th 
last, in the factory of Messrs. A. Hol- 
lander & Sons, of Montreal, the fur 
dyers and furriers. Enormous damage 
was done to both premises and stock, 
the extent of which has not yet been 
determined. 



Dry Goods Review 



65- 



Lively Interest in Dress Goods 

Silks in Crepe Weaves Selling in Range of Exquisite Shades -- Woolen Dress Goods Wil 
Move More Rapidly as Stocks in Retail Stores Diminish — No Further Drop in 

Cottons, Demand Decidedly Brisk. 



THE outlook in the textile trade is 
decidedly encouraging. Silks, as 
stated in last month's issue, have 
made a spectacular recovery and since 
this reassuring information was first 
announced the market has been charac- 
terized by steadily firming prices in lines 
which had fallen away out of all pro- 
portion. 

From Dame Fashion's point of view 
this is to be a most interesting silk sea- 
son. New York, whither all buyers as- 
sembled at the very outset of the year, 
has created a whirlwind craze for soft 
silks and sent everyone back singing the 
praises of Cantons and Kitten's Ear. 
Crepes, crepes, crepes, the never-ending 
song of these soft clinging fabrics, seems 
to gain favor with repetition; for in place 
of the stiff silks which are wont to shine 
in the Winter parade of la mode are the 
lovely soft washable silk materials in a 
score of fascinating weaves desgned for 
every possible use, from sports wear to 
formal attire, from bathing togs to bou- 
doir trappings. These new silks are only 
rivalled in weave by the colors employed. 
The most exquisite range of rose, blue, 
lavender, buff and grey tones are seen, 
also all the navys, browns and black 
and white combinations conceived by the 
chic Parisian modistes. 

Advance News From Paris. 

Several months ago Dry Goods Review 
was fortunate in securing samples of the 
new silk leader, Canton crepe, sent direct 
from a French house by our Paris corre- 
spondent. The tremendous vogue in 
store for this superb material was at 
that time related, and there is little won- 
der in the fact that the vogue has 
"caught on" in such a measure on this 
side. The material is ideal for almost 
any dress use and can be adopted for 
the type of costume desired, guided, of 
course, by the color used. Whole suits, 
frocks, sports costumes and even capes 
for formal and informal wear are fash- 
ioned of Cantone crepe, while other crepe 
weaves are also featured in lighter silk 
materials for more ordinary require- 
ments. While grey is the dominant color 
note of the season as far as the very 
fashionable are concerned, it is believed 
that navy leads with the popular demand 
and to this end the requirements in 
navys are being met with difficulty and 
there is already considerable talk of a 
shortage in both taffetas and soft satin 
weaves. Browns and taupe shades are 
also strongly featured in the silk lines, 
while among the fancy leaders are the 
vivid new blue tones and the new rose 
shade known as "Sunrise," a subtle tone 



between orange and henna. It is exqui- 
site when combined in carefully chosen 
quantities with the Quaker grey of this 
season, as also are the new blues and the 
pheasant tints. 

"There is a much better feeling in the 
dry goods trade," reported the head 
buyer for one big wholesale house this 
month. "We have been very heavily 
stocked for some time and the merchants 
have been letting their stocks get very 
low. They are endeavoring to carry 
lighter stocks and have therefore de- 
ferred buying as long as possible. They 
are buying now, however, and as a result 
we are glad to see our own heavy stocks 
moving. Nevertheless, the merchant is 
buying very carefully and we do not in- 
tend to urge matters. We are, of course, 
overstocked in woollen dress goods, but 
we know that they will be needed before 
very long, so we are waiting our time 
and not worrying." 

Woolen Favorites 

In woolen lines tricotines have been 
and are exceedingly modish. A splen- 
did range of shades are available in the 
tricotine lines, rendering them adaptable 



A NOVEL FASHION DISPLAY 

A new and lavish note was 
struck at a mannequin display in a 
new establishment opened recently 
in Bond Street. London. 

The chief mannequin, of rare 
beauty and charm, was a Russian 
refugee, a woman of high rank, 
who refused to divulge her identity 
because of the work which she has 
been forced to take up. The first) 
scene showed the fair unknown in 
bed, surrounded by the luxuries of 
a woman of wealth — beautiful lace 
bedclothes, exquisite dressing-table 
appointments, perfumes and pow- 
ders. A little maid awakened her 
mistress, and brought her some 
love letters and a gorgeous bou- 
quet of roses, fashioned out of gold 
tissue and shaded satin. 

Madame's day, with her various 
toilettes and visits from the repre- 
sentatives of hat and frock shops, 
was watched with the keenest in- 
terest by the select audience. The 
genius of the chief mannequin and 
the grace with which she per- 
formed little informal dances made 
the display much more than a 
mannequin parade. The conversa- 
tion was in French. 



for house costumes and street suits as- 
well as Spring coats and wraps. Serges, 
gabardines and broadcloths are also be- 
ing featured in the smart designs, being- 
exhibited to tempt the Easter trade, and 
it would look as though Spring, 1921, is 
to be responsible for some of the smart- 
est cloth costumes viewed in many a 
season. One-toned effects are in very 
good taste for dressy wear, but when 
it comes to informal or sports attire the 
check and the plaid, as well as the stripe 
figure prominently, either compressing 
the entire model or allied with a plain 
fabric to produce a two or three-piece 
costume. 

Fancy Voiles. 

"We have been doing a very large 
business in siik and cotton voiles, in 
fancy foulards and marquisettes in 
striped effects," stated one prominent 
Toronto wholesaler this month. 

"We have carried these handsome 
French lines and made a specialty of 
them for some time, and are now receiv- 
ing orders from many of our customers 
who have not been buying these fancy 
lines for some time." These new voiles, 
some of which were illustrated in the 
January issue of Dry Goods Review, are 
unusually beautiful in coloring and de- 
sign and are promised a very strong 
vogue for mid-Summer wear. They will 
be used for frocks for children and for 
ladies' afternoon costumes for garden 
party wear, etc., and will be garnished 
with pretty laces and ribbons in har- 
monizing and contrasting hues. 

Cottons in Demand. 

There is a decided shortage in some 
lines of cotton dress goods, notably ging- 
hams. In spite of the big cuts announced 
earlier in the season, business has been 
fairly normal, and there has been no 
further reduction since the first week 
in January. Wholesalers report that the 
demand for cotton goods has been very 
good and as a result their own stocks 
are fairly low, and a shortage is fully 
expected in some lines. One house re- 
ports that although cash returns will be 
lower for the year as compared with 
1920, due to the cuts made, at the same 
time a larger volume of business is 
expected. 

The cotton novelties for 1921 are very 
effective and feature smart plaids in 
ginghams, fancy stripes in voiles and 
handsome all-over patterns in marqui- 
settes. Pretty dotted effects will be 
featured in some of the dainty imported 
voiles, while white grounds, with vividly 
embroidered motifs in silk or wool will 
be offered for the exclusive trade. 






DRESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 



& 



&m&- 



-C_3- 



-£>g^gj 



AN EXTENSIVE 
RIBBON SEASON 

1 1 1 r I II I II I II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 h 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 < 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M > 1 1 1 M 1 1 J r 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ IJ 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 U I M I M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 11 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! L 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

ON practically every article you pick up to-day — 
either millinery or garment — you will find a touch 
of Ribbon either of a narrow novelty or wide de- 
nomination, and as the days pass by Ribbons are being 
shown far more largely than ever before. PARIS is 
showing Ribbons on hats and garments as the}- never 
have shown them before, and London and New York are 
following right in line. 

We, therefore, urge our customers to supply their 
immediate wants with narrow novelties as we anticipate 
a big demand for this class of merchandise for Easter 
selling. We have an extensive range of these goods on 
hand to-day for immediate delivery. Samples gladly 
submitted. 

I niinlllMMIIMMIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMMIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIMIIIMIIIMII 

RIBBONS LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



® 



- 6 fr - 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



<&Q a^ o&O d>0 « 



EASTER SILKS 



IMIMMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIMIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllMIIIMIIMIIIIMIIiniMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIMIIIIIMIMIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIII 

WE are ready with a magnificent display of all 
the latest novelties. Our stock is complete 
with all the best and newest shades, and our 
assortment is unsurpassed in Canada. Send for sam- 
ples or call and s$e our range of the following: — 



36 and 38 in. Swiss Taffeta 
Negro, Navy, Dutch and all the 
most up-to-the-minute shades — 
immediate delivery. 



ALL NEW MERCHANDISE JUST PASSED INTO STOCK 

Satin Stripe Poplins 

Fancy Voiles 

Jacquard Silks 

Jerseys, in every shade 

Plain and Novelty Baronettes 
Washable Satins Black and Colored Duchess 

Crepe de Chines Black and Colored Paillettes 

Georgettes Lining Satins 

; 1 1 r 1 1 ri 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 11 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 fii 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ri 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 j 1 1 1 »> 1 m 1 1 1 1 [1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 [1 1 ■ ) 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 ■ 1 1 m )■ 1 1 11 1 m 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 111 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 ri m 1 ■ 1 1 11 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 ■ 1 ) ■ 1 fi 1 1 1 r 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 : 

SILKS LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 









Dry Goods Review 



Flowers, Fruits and Feathers ! 

Famous French Designers Send Their Loveliest Creations as Forerunners of a Colorful 
Season— Picturesque Are the Styles For Spring and Varied the Uses of Trimmings 
-Drenched Plumes and Dripping Effects in Ribbons and Flowers Are Seen 



F LOWERS and fruit; elaborate lace 
and ribbon arrangements; drenched 
ostrich and other plumes drooping 
from one side of the brim; generous use 
of lace and horsehair braids; grey crepe 
de chine; shiny straws combined with 
cloth, with silk, with satin, with crepe; 
vivid colors; glistening black or grey — 
the grey of the Quaker maid — Egyptian 
influences; irregular contours; coquettish 
veils — such is the fascinating story of 
the Spring chapeau de luxe. The maze 
of beauty offered would be confusing 
were the advocates of la mode aught but 
feminine: as it is, they leai'n the new 
millinery dictionary each season without 
an effort, and the names of the newest 
straws and novelties are known to them 
almost as soon as they are conceived by 
the great ateliers. There is nothing in 
the matter of dress that more readily 
captivates the fancy of a woman than 
a pretty hat. When she is feeling 
gloomy she invariably invests in a new 
chapeau and is at once revived in spirits. 
When the season's costume grows too 
monotonous and requires just something 
to liven it — a smart little hat does the 
trick. When a particularly good im- 
pression must be made by the society 
woman, the mannequin or the business 
woman, the milliner is expected to fur- 
nish the piece de resistance of the cos- 
tume. The magic of the fashionable 
wardrobe is" in the hat. The Spring of 
1921 raises the art of millinery to an 
even higher standard than it has hitherto 
enjoyed, for such superb colors, such un- 
usual trimming motifs, such perfect 
■lines and such fabrics have not been 
seen for many a season. 

Inevitable Tendency 

Paris has surpassed herself in the 
matter of color and novelty, artistry and 
design; and New York is following close- 
ly the original creations of the French 
designers. The result is that interest in 
the world of hats is keen, and after a 
period which must at least be classified 
as "dull" the situation presented is rather 
in the other extreme. Buyers went 
earlier to New York than usual to see 
what they could see and buy what they 
wanted. According to the buyers them- 
selves they received a surprise. 

"There was such a clamor for the 
goods, such a rush into the market that 
the exact opposite effect was produced 
from what was desired," declared one 
prominent buyer who has represented a 
Toronto house in the United States and 
overseas markets for many years. "It 
is as hard to get orders filled as ever, 
and the manufacturers were so busy 




Forerunners of Spring 

Upper: Hindu turban of copper-colored 
satin trimmed with blue Tagel, Milan and 
pearl ornament. Lower: A Baker creation 
in Milan hemp being shown in all colors 
trimmed with satin twisted band. — Court- 
esy of Toronto Hat Company. 

even the first week in January that they 
would promise nothing for the entire 
month. 

"This produced an unfortunate effect, 
viewed from the angle of hoped-for- 
lower prices," continued this buyer. 
"The makers cannot fill orders and the 
demand being in excess of the available 
supply will undoubtedly keep prices up. 
Moreover, I have always maintained, 
and find it to be the case again this 
season, that high prices must be paid 
for high quality materials. The ordi- 
nary line of goods, manufactured as they 



are from silks and cottons, are naturally 
affected by the condition of the markets 
controlling these commodities. But 
when it comes to ornaments and fabrics 
in which the novelty of beautiful color- 
ing, peculiar weave or unusually treated 
surfaces is featured such merchandise 
cannot be secured for a song — and it is 
frequently the presence of one single 
beautiful velvet petalled rose that ren- 
ders a model prohibitive in price to the 
popular trade." 

The Fascination of Grey 

Many of the exclusive models which 
were designed in Paris for the Riviera 
Winter are already being cleverly copied 
by Canadian designers, who have been 
closely studying the French trend 
through the New York market during 
the past few weeks. The features which 
have been decided upon are interesting 
in the extreme. The grey vogue of 
which Dry Goods Review talked last 
Autumn has grown with each succeed- 
ing week and now both in Paris and 
New York the all-grey close-fitting 
model of grey crepe de chine is the 
novelty of the moment while other less 
remarkable but equally lovely models 
exploit grey as the dominant note with 
a touch of pheasant, a fleck of jade, a 
bit of rose or a wisp of gorgeous blue 
to furnish the aspect of practicability 
which must characterize every model de- 
signed for street wear. 

"The grey vogue should not be killed 
by the omission of a necessary touch of 
color," was the emphatic statement of 
one prominent buyer to a representative 
of Dry Goods Review. "The all grey 
model can only be successfully adopted 
for theatrical or stage purposes. On 
very rare occasions when extremely for- 
mal attire is in order the all-grey hat 
may be "worn by the right woman, but 
in my opinion there is only one woman 
in a thousand who will look properly 
dressed in a grey hat which carries not 
the slightest touch of color. It is a most 
trying experiment and in most cases has 
been found unsuccessful." 

Asked for an explanation of why so 
many all-grey models have been dis- 
playing in all-grey window displays in 
New York and other fashion centres, this 
buyer replied: "There is a psychology 
in this solid unrelieved use of grey in 
window displays. The public has grown 
weary of vivid and bizarre effects in 
colors. They have been overdone. The 
all-grey, all-tan or all-lavender windows 
provide a remarkably restful contrast. 
They are beautiful, distinctive, refined, 
and they are a relief to the eye, over- 



Drii Goods Review 



MILLINERY 



G9 



tired with too much color. But they are 
purely of theatrical value. The all-grey 
hat as an enhancement to beauty will 
remain beyond the reach of all but a 
very few." 

A Riot of Lovely Color 

But this opinion from one of the ex- 
perts in the creation of fashionable 
headgear need not be taken as discour- 
aging information by the trade, for 
while all-grey may be most trying for 
the majority of fashion adherents there 
are many exquisite shades both beauti- 
ful and becoming to the right type of 
face. The Spring is to be a blaze of 
color, and these colors have been select- 
ed in no half-hearted fashion. There is 
courage evidenced in every tone of blue, 
rose, green, purple and red. Glistening 
cherries will blaze on quaint blue pokes, 
varicolored garlands will garnish pic- 
turesque Directoires, wide drooping 
brims will support crowns of solid 
masses of gaily tinted posies and the 
sauciest little close-fitting tricorns will 
exploit trims of drenched plumes or side 
"dripping" ribbon streamers. 

Many Quaint Styles Seen 

The Egyptian and Directoire modes 
will rival each other for favor, and the 
smartly "draped" turban in either straw 
or fabric will share honors with the ever 
distinctive sailor of masculine severity. 

The Napoleon shape is developed in 
innumerable shiny braids and glazed 
satins and smartly ornamented with a 
saucy ribbon or feather cockade. 

Contrasts 

Quaint Empire styles are sponsored 
side by side with chic toques and tur- 
bans built on mediaeval or Oriental 
lines. Faille is interwoven with metal 
and a crown devised beneath which ex- 
tends a mohair brim. This reveals the 
sumptuous note in Spring millinery. 
Black tagel fashioned into a Louis XV 
contour and banded with pink roses 
sponsors the oft-repeated note of coquet- 
tishness which is equally in vogue. 

Wide sweeping brims of gossamer 
transparency and snug little mushroom 
shapes with scarcely any brim at all 
reveal the lack of prejudice on Dame 
Fashion's part when the Spring is being 
considered, and the fact that much trim- 
ming and no trimming at all are equally 
chic conveys in no uncertain fashion 
that "Everywoman's" taste is to be 
satisfied. 

Cellophane and Crepe 

For immediate wear cellophane com- 
bined with satin straw braid or crepe is 
unusually smart. Off the face lines in 
close-fitting toques are particularly 
smart, though many of the newer cha- 
peaux allow their up-tilting lines to veer 
around to the side and at the sauciest 
angle possible are seen shoots of quills 
or feathers or ribbon motifs. The solid 
cluster effect in soft petalled flowers is 



very lovely as is the trailing effect of 
both posies and fruits. 

Very youthful also are the drooping 
brimmed models with soft crowns of ir- 
regular or tarn line which introduce 
pretty scarfs of Georgette or crepe or 
ribbon. Grapes are a favorite trimming 
in all shades on all types of models. 

What Is in Store 

As the season advances pastel tints 
will come to the fore, lace will be lav- 
ishly used — transparent effects and 
chiffon scarfs will revel in mid-Summer 
favor. For the time being models for 
trim street wear choose to be quite small 
and neat in design, but they simply have 
no compunction whatever when it comes 
to color. Vivid silks vie with bright red 
and green cellophanes combinations are 
most unusual — all of which goes to prove 
that when the street costume is drab, 
the chapeau must be gay. 

The models illustrated this month have 
been chosen to reveal the varied treat- 
ment of smart Spring models for early 
wear. Easter is at hand and the Easter 
bonnet is one of the most important con- 
siderations of the moment. The picture 
hat for the time being is overlooked and 
the swagger line of the close-fitting 
model is revealed in all its charm and 
suitability for the approaching weeks. 
The trailing feathers which are to be 



prominently featured are shown in two 
of the models sketched, while a chic 
toque and a bewitching sailor are also 
illustrated as among the season's 
smartest. 



OPEN MILLINERY SALON 

The Dolly Imbrey Blouse shops, Bank 
Street, Ottawa, announce that they will 
open a millinery department immediate- 
ly and will offer the ladies of the capital 
very attractive prices on millinery that 
will be the last word in styles of the 
moment. 



EXPORT REGISTER OF BRITISH 
INDUSTRIES 

The 1920 edition of the Export Regis- 
ter of the Federation of British Indus- 
tries has made its appearance. The Fed- 
eration, founded during the war, occupies 
a predominant position in British indus- 
try today. The Export Register ex- 
plains its organization for the benefit of 
consumers and buyers of British goods 
throughout the world. It also gives in- 
formation on the scope of British manu- 
facture which has been greatly extended 
of late years and affords business con- 
cerns an opportunity of surveying this 
advance as a whole. The editorial and 
publishing offices are at 7 Red Lion 
Court, Fleet Street, London, E. C. 4, Eng. 




Vanguards of Fashion 



Left: A swagger Ticorne of cire satin in henna with tagel facing and a sunburst trail 
of henna plumes. Right: A stunning all-black model of glistening cellophane trimmed 
with long, black drenched feathers trailing over both shoulders. — Courtesy S. F. McKinnon 
Company. 



D nj Goods RevieUs 



The Easter Bonnet Arrives 

Montreal Buyers For Big Shops and Wholesale Houses Ecstatic Over New Fabrics, New 

Flowers, and New Foliage — No Doubt as to the Spring Outlook — Everything is 

Blooming and Hats Are Universally Colorful. 




A Trio of Spring Charms 



Above are illustrated a fascinating group of smart models f or immediate wear. A burnt orange straw model is almost 
covered with white wool ; in the oval is a stunning creation in pheasant tagel with exquisitely tinted foliage outlining the 
drooping tarn crown. A clever conception of the Indian head dress is seen on the right with beads and tassel to decorate the 
role brim. 



WINTER millinery is already an- 
cient history as far as 1921 is 
concerned, and Montreal shops 
are beginning now to fill up with charm- 
ing chapeaux for Spring wear. For 
very earliest Spring days, as an accom- 
paniment of the smart tailored suit or 
frock, the small hat is by all odds the 
wisest selection. Hats of this type are 
given first attention by milliners just 
now, and the pre-Easter showings are 
in full swing. 

In the course of a tour of the various 
millinery departments, a representative 
of Dry Goods Review secured several 
interviews with the buyers who have re- 
cently returned from Xew York. 

Although the formal opening will not 
be held until March 8, nevertheless a 
wonderful display of models greets the 
eye of the seeker after the newest in 
headwear, at the Henry Morgan store. 
"I never remember seeing such attrac- 
tive Spring hats as those shown in New 



York last week," stated J. Lauterman, 
manager of the millinery department. 
"The prices are down considerably be- 
low last year's on most lines, and alto- 
gether the showings are decidedly bet- 
ter. I consider that the Spring models 
express the last word in artistic design 
and -perfection of workmanship, without 
a trace or exaggeration of freakishness. 
Color combinations are sometimes start- 
ling, but always harmonious and every 
hat of any pretension to smartness has 
an individuality impossible to define in 
words. I visited a number of millinery 
houses in New York which are exhibit- 
ing their initial showings on this con- 
tinent, and was fortunate to get a num- 
ber of their creations, which will cer- 
tainly excite some comment. These hats 
are, of course, hand made and will sat- 
isfy the most ardent seeker after 'some- 
thing different.' 

"Generally speaking," continued Mr. 
Lauterman, "crowns are a trifle larger 



and are soft and supple to the touch. 
Stiff effects are totally passe, as prac- 
tically everything is hand made. The 
Directoire and poke effects were very 
strong and most milliners were using 
enormous quantities of flowers in 
wreaths, sprays, single large blossoms, 
fruit clusters, heathers and grasses, wild 
berries and everything in the foliage 
line which can be developed in delicate 
and natural colorings. Prices were mod- 
erate on accessories, too, when you con- 
sider the workmanship and I am offer- 
ing a collection of hand-made flowers 
for Easter, which will range as low as 
75 cents a spray and as high as $25 for 
the largest and most elaborate. 

"As for colors, of course gray and the 
pheasant shades lead, but the darker 
navies and brown are good, too. Jade 
is again to the fore as well. Ribbons 
are particularly strong in the quaint 
picot-edged narrow widths, and quan- 
tities of loops are arranged to cascade 



Dry Goods Revh w 



MILLIN E R Y 



71 



down from the side of the hat, almost 
to the wearer's waist. The large hats 
were unusually beautiful, characterized 
by a curving brim, either in picture 
style or in a simpler drooping effect at 
the sides only. The all black hat in 
mohair braid was featured prominently 
but in cleverly wired shapes, effectively 
trimmed with flossed ostrich, with no 
color contrast whatever." 

A Shiny Straw Model 

Among the clever conceptions from 
New York imported by Mr. Lauterman 
was a smart cellophane toque in change- 
able blue and black, slightly raised on 
one side with a cleverly made ornament 
of cellophane and jet, simulating beads 
as the sole trimming. A gay little sports 
model was of American Beauty and Co- 
penhagen straw liberally besprinkled 
with bead embroidery and fine braiding. 
Another model, slightly larger in size, 
was of pheasant visca bi'aid, dotted over 
with black patent leather flowers and 
draped about the crown with a banding 
of visca, buttonholed in black wool. A 
bewitching poke of steel gray was en- 
livened with a touch of pumpkin, a first 
cousin of the ever popular henna, and 
was beaded closely with real coral. A 
Hindoo turban of gray georgette fea- 
tured the ultra smart streamer scarf at 
the right side, and was dotted all over 
with dozens of tiny hemp rings, no 
larger than a finger ring, in half a dozen 
different colors. The rings were sewn 
on by hand with contrasting floss, and 
made to stand up vertically. A smart 
turban tarn of black tagel was complete- 
ly hidden under a thatch of uncurled 
ostrich which radiated from the centre^ 
of the crown and hung gracefully down 
over the edges. A pumpkin taffeta 
model turned its brim upwards to show 
an adorable wreath of blossoms veiled 
with fine black lace. A round turban 
of gray georgette had a banding of ac- 
cordeon pleated ribbon laid around the 
edge, overlapping a crown of gray cello- 
phane and caught with a crescent of 
glittering rhinestones. A large draped 
veil of navy blue, heavily embroidered^ 
with gray wool in a fine rose design, 
was caught to the top of this delight- 
fully unique hat and was decidedly ef- 
fective. For the younger girl, a rolling 
sailor shape of white taffeta with a 
navy tagel crown was shown, the taf- 
feta being heavily embroidered in silk 
floss. The crown was crushed towards 
the back and was encircled by a simple 
ribbon tie. A wide-brimmed sports hat 
of navy tagel was faced upon the upper 
side with tan silk, figured with tomato 
and navy futurist designs and hemp mo- 
tifs, conveying an extremely original 
note. A charming little tailored shape 
was of navy Batavia cloth with a taf- 
feta crown in the same shade, daintily 
trimmed with the narrowest of braids 
in self color. The hat was a directoire 
shape, yet as pliant as possible. 

For the matron was shown a striking 
turban of woven black and gray cello- 



phane braids, a jet ornament, was placed 
at one side and the underbrim was faced 
with a narrow band of satin. A large 
picture shape of delicately transparent 
tulle in dead black was dazzling by rea- 
son of its resplendent wreath of won- 
derful flowers in pastel tints, laid about 
the crown. The all black hat of diaph- 
anous fabric will be a leading feature 
for the Summer of 1921, when elaborat- 
ed with the assistance of these delicate 
floral effects. 

The Art in Make Believe Flowers 

A display of these flowers of unusual 
merit is also a feature of the millinery 
salon of the Colonial House, and is a 
veritable garden of loveliness. Several 
large glass fixtures are filled with huge 
baskets of blossoms, including roses, 
pansies, forget-me-nots, fruit, etc., inter- 
spersed with trays heaped with luscious 
cherries and jars of delicate grasses. 



Festoons of pale rose-tinted pieot ribbon 
are looped from end to end of the cases 
and at the back are ranged a pyramid 
of rose satin oval boxes, made to con- 
tain the posies which are sold separately 
as corsage bouquets. The floor of the 
show cases is strewn over with wreaths 
and sprays, made of cotton, velvet, silk 
and the new coral composition. A fea- 
ture of the new flowers is the bas-relief 
effect in sprays, which show a perfect 
full bloom rose on one side only, tjie 
reverse being flat and faced with can- 
vas for attaching to the hat. The roses 
are realistic to a degree. Clusters of 
fruit in pastel colors are made of tiny 
balls of silk floss veiled with transpar- 
ent net, and wild berries are cleverly 
imitated in a wax-like composition in 
pinks and reds. Large single petals are 
much admired and are strewn about as 
though but newly shed from the living 
(Continued on page 124) 



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Cellophane and Chantilly 

Smart cellophane Xapoleon hat with new chantillly lace trimming from 
the Maison Lewis, Paris. — Imported by the J. M. Orkin Co. of Montreal. 



Milium i ii mi i n i m mum m urn m urn mm mum i in i n i ii i mm in in mum ii i ii m i ii in i ii i n i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiliilliililiiiiiililiniuiinii uiinllimiiimimimmllllimmmimmil- 



MILLINERY 



Dry Goods Review 



E 



Easter Millinery 




nl 



Baker Hats 

Be Ready for That Easter Trade ! 

* Brisk selling is yours if Baker Hats form the nucleus of 
your Millinery Display. 

The masterly touch of style that is at once apparent in 
every number — 

The artistic, becoming color and trimming effects — 

The nicety of finish and enduring quality that have long 
been characteristics — 

These are the features that have contributed to the great Style makes 

popularity of BAKER HATS. the Hat 

ALL THAT IS NEW IN Braids, Trimmings, Flowers, Feathers, etc. 

Be sure to visit our conveniently located Showrooms, or send for a 
sample assortment. 

TORONTO HAT CO., Limited 

Manufacturers Selling Direct to the Trade 

The Canadian House for Ready-to-Wears 
76 Wellington Street West, - Toronto, Ontario 

71 f-j Branch: Citizen Building, Ottawa, A. J. AYEARST Branch: Hammond Block, Winnipeg, J. G. MARTIN 



Baker Hats 
have Style 



c 



E2 



° m 



13 




DYNAMO BRAND 



By this Mark you are enabled to 
recognise MALINES which can- 
not be equalled in Quality— absolute 
Exclusiveness and Economy. 



MONTREAL 
Room 705 

Read Bldg. 
Tel. Main 6524 



"Dynamo Brand" Malines 

Are guaranteed Rainproof. They resist Rain — Dampness — 
Snow — Sun and Perspiration. 

They excel where others fail, and they naturally become the 
ideal Maline for Millinery and for Maline Scarves, so appro- 
priate for evening wear. They are economic, because one 
yard of Dynamo Maline offers more advantages than two 
yards of any other make. Buy Dynamo Maline, it is the 
Original Guaranteed Rainproof Maline. 

CHAS. MOUTERDE {United Makers) 

The"only selling agents for Gros Million & Co. of Lyons (France) for the 
Dominion of Canada. We only sell to the Wholesalers. 



80 Wellington 
St. West 

TORONTO 
Tel. Adel. 4184 



Dry Goods Review 



MILLINERY 



73 



\- o .o . o . -*r 



o 
% 



/ 



Easter Millinery 



New 
Model Hats 

for late Spring 

and early Summer 

Wear 

are now coming, from 

our Workrooms in 

most attractive 

designs. 

BUYERS visiting the 

City are invited to 

inspect. 



In all Departments our stock is splen- 
didly assorted in new merchandise 
at new prices. 



G. GOULDING & SONS 




55 Wellington St. West, Toronto 

^Winnipeg Ottawa 

66 King St. Jackson Bldg, 



Hamilton 
283^ John St. N. 



o 

•o 

* 



o 

o 



O^Oo^O, — ^ 



74 MILLINERY Dry Goods Review 



UNIVERSAL HATS 



means 



Trimmed Hats 
of Springtime Smartness 



at 



Prices from $3.50 to $6.00 



All Soft Hand-Made Effects— In appear- 
ance closely resembling the exclusive 
higher priced models. 

Straw Braids— Shiny Visca Braids and Straw 
Cloths, fine quality Batavia, and Cello- 
phane. 

Silks— Faille Silk, Crepe de Chine, Taffeta. 

Trimmed— With lots of new lovely Flower 
effects and tailored with Beads, Orna- 
ments or Embroidered Motifs. 

Colors— The bright new shades of Pearl 
Grey, Pheasant, Henna, Copen, and the 
always liked Black, Brown and Navy. 



Universal Hats will increase your Sales Records 

Send us an open order to-day for one or two dozen to start the season 

with, we will send you the best selling models. 

Regular Millinery Terms. 



S. F. McKinnon & Company, Limited 

Toronto - Canada 

Montreal - Winnipeg - Quebec - London - Paris - New York 



Dry Hoods Review 



M 1 I. 1,1 NEKY 



75 




Latest Millinery 
Novelty 

"CELLOSPREY" 

LIMITED QUANTITY ONLY 



$ 1 22° Per Dozen 



JOSEPH LEONE & CO. 

Wholesale Millinery 

17 ST. HELEN STREET 
MONTREAL 



Please send me 
dozen of your 



"Cellosprey" at above 

price. 

Name 

Address 

City 



,.'; '.".' '.'.'i g.C U}1 >jv !.' r U v n i; n v n i.. J MMUmMJmMUm^MMSM 53 ^ 

I 



NIKROHAT 
MILLINERY 



Up-to-date 

Pattern Hats 



Immediate 
Delivery 



All Millinery 

Accessories, 

including: 

Hats 

Frames 

Ribbons 

Silks 

Flowers 

Fancy Feathers 

Cellophone 
Cloths and 
Novelties 




J.M.ORKIN&CO. 

Limited 

WHOLESALE 
MILLINERS 

214 Notre Dame Street 

MONTREAL 



76 



Dry Goods Review 



Second Annual Canadian Fur Auction 

Ever)- Part of the Globe Where Fur-bearing Animals Are Found Contributed Pelts to 
Canadian Fur Sale in Montreal — In Face of Crisis, Results Are Promising — 

Prices Decline 40 to 60 Per Cent. 



THE second annual sale of the Can- 
adian Fur Auction Sales Company 
is now a matter of history, and its 
result, happening as it did in the face 
of a crisis in the industry, was decidedly 
better than was anticipated by those in 
closest touch with conditions. 

The holding of the sale entailed im- 
mense preparations, including the classi- 
fying and recording of the pelts as they 
were received from all over the world at 
the company's warehouse. Almost at 
the last moment a lai-ge shipment of 
Persian lamb skins from Bokara, Asia 
Minor, was received, and some of the 
other interesting items were consign- 
ments of dogmats from the Celestial Em- 
pire, robes from Thibet, sables from 
Russia, wallaby, wombat and kangaroo 
from Australia and a polar bear from 
the north of our own country. In fact, 
every part of the globe where furred 
animals are to be found was represented 
in the auction. The world was literally 
scoured for pelts of all and every de- 
scription of the highest standard. The 
general collection taken altogether was 
well above the average and featured 
some items of unusual quality. 

The quantity of furs offered was con- 
siderably less than on the occasion of the 
last Canadian sale, but the quality was 
excellent, especially in Canadian furs, 
which attracted much interest on the 
part of buyers from other countries. A 
fine collection of beaver drew forth much 
favorable comment by connoisseurs in 
peltry, as did mink, otter and muskrat 
among the other exhibits. 

The Program 

The following is the program followed 
by the executive in charge of arrange- 
ments, beginning with the opening on 
Monday, January 31, at 9 a.m. F. J. 
Shields read the terms of sale in English 
and French on behalf of the Auction 
Sales Company, and the position of offi- 
cial auctioneer was again capably filled 
by F. Craig, of Brockville. 

Monday's Sales 

The principal offerings on the first day 
of the sale were collections of mink, er- 
mine, fox, Russian sables and Canadian 
and Australian opossum, as well as 
smaller lots of marten and fisher. Mar- 
ten ranged from about $6.50 to $69 and 
$73. Last year the highest price was 
$201 and the lowest $35. Fisher brought 
$13 to $125, as compared with $75 to 
$365 last March. The higher prices bid 
for the morning's offerings brought ap- 
plause from the assemblage of buyers, 
but the general tendency was to run the 



•■■HaniaaBiBauBfta 




bidding close. W. Jaeckel and H. Ganss, 
of New York, were among the high bid- 
ders on fisher. Prices ranged from 35 
per cent, to 50 per cent, above December 
and January levels of fur prices. 

Tuesday 

Beaver proved the most popular offer- 
ing of the second day, and bidding was 
fairly well divided among the prominent 
houses represented by the large number 
of buyers present. The highest price 
reached was $32.75 and the lowest $5, as 
compared with $25 to $106 last year. 
Among the bidders were M. Mautner, A. 
J. Weinschenker, W. Jaeckel, David 
Steiner and H. Ganss, of New York; O. 
G. Becker, of Chicago; and Mr. Loffree, 
representing the John Hallam Company, 
of Toronto. The prices brought were 
said to be above those of the New York 
sale, and, taking into consideration the 
value of English money, to compare fa- 
vorably with the London sale. Mention 
was made of the prices brought at the 
London sales as follows: 

Moose River and Eastman firsts, 140 
shillings; Fort George firsts, 135 shil- 
lings; large, 100 shillings; Eskimovag 
firsts, 125 shillings; large dark firsts, 165 
shillings; Canadian firsts, 120 shillings; 
dark, 135 shillings; Northwestern firsts 
and seconds, 110 shillings. In London, 
as here, Americans were heavy buyers. 

A large number of wolf skins were also 
disposed of, and Messrs. Brod, Fuerth 
and Herscovitz, of New York, were 
among the highest bidders. The prices 
ranged from about a dollar to $12.50. 
Timber wolf was not in much demand. 
Persians ranged from $3.50 to $6.25 and 
the principal buyers were H. Fuerth, of 
New York, and Cummings & Cummings, 
of Montreal. Krimmer went at $7.50 
and American opossum ranged from 10 
cents to $1.02 apiece. The approximate 
range of prices on other miscellaneous 
lots were given as follows: 

Red fox, $1.10 to $29 for a lot of 53 
Alaska foxes; Australian fox, 20 cents to 
$4.50; Australian opossum, 38 cents to 
$4.60, Mr. Bender of Toronto being the 



highest bidder; ringtail opossum, 10 to 
55 cents; ermine, from 8 cents for brown 
weasel to $1.05 for high grade skins; 
marten, from 25 cents to $18, A. Eisen- 
bach, of New York, being one of the high 
bidders; fitch, 55 cents. 

Wednesday 

Prices biought during the third day's 
selling showed an improvement over New 
York prices, according to buyers who 
had attended both sales, and the estimate 
varied from 10 to 20 per cent, in favor 
of Canadian prices. In comparison with 
last year, however, the drop is great. 
Silver fox ranged from $35 to $400, the 
latter price being paid by W. A. Miller, 
of Prince Edward Island. The better 
grade foxes brought $295 and upwards 
to $375. W. Jaeckel, A. Eisenbach, G. 
Fuerth and Fred Ramelson, of New 
York, were among the bidders on silver 
fox. Last year the prices ranged from 
$150 to $1,225. Raccoon ranged from 85 
cents to $7. Ermine and Russian sable 
were resold and a large number of kolin- 
sky skins were disposed of for about 
$1.40. The prices here again were an 
improvement on the New York sale. Last 
March raccoon varied from $4.45 to $50. 

Beaver and muskrat were the offer- 
ings of the afternoon and were of great 
interest to the majority of buyers. Musk- 
rat ran to about $2.20 with keen compe- 
tition displayed. Among the large buy- 
ers were O. Silverman, of Winnipeg, 
Becker Bros., Jos. Steiner and Bros., Le- 
berge Chevalier, A. and E. Pierce and 
the Standard Fur Co., of New York. 
Marmots were of keen interest to Can- 
adian buyers, while squirrels, which went 
as high as $1.24, were bought chiefly by 
New Yorkers. Cross fox proved of in- 
terest to Parisian, Dutch and New York 
firms, a number of skins going to Van 
Veen, of Rotterdam. The prices in gen- 
eral were considered slightly higher than 
those of the recent New York sale. The 
price range in this city last March was' 
as follows: Muskrat, $2.05 to $6.35; 
squirrel, 70 cents to $2.60; moles 35 to 
65 cents. 

Thursday 

As the program of the auction had 
been so arranged as to leave the least 
interesting furs until the last, to enable 
the New York buyers to get away in 
time to attend the St. Louis auction 
(which was later postponed until the 
22nd), there was only a short session of 
two hours held in the morning. 

A very miscellaneous assortment of 
pelts were offered, comprising badger, 
bear, muskox, dogmats, Thibet lamb 



Dry Goods Review 



FUR DEPARTMENT 



77 



robes, moles, wallaby, wombats, kan- 
garoo and hair seal. 

Mole aroused considerable competition, 
particularly among; Canadian firms, Red- 
mond & Co., of Montreal, being among 
the chief buyers. The skins ran about 
30 cents each. Cummings & Cummings, 
of Montreal, displayed an interest in the 
Australian furs and Gnaedinger Sons & 
Co. were among the bidders on dogmats. 
A Quebec firm and Mr. Jewett, of New 
York, were among the chief buyers of 
bear skins. 

The sale was declared closed at 11 
p.m., on Thursday, February 4, and the 
total value of sales made was announced 
to be over $1,320,000. 

About 350 buyers attended the auction. 

Official Announcement 

An announcement was issued by the 
Sales Company at the conclusion of the 
auction estimating the average decline in 
prices as compared with those reached 
last March. Fur prices declined 40 to 
60 per cent, according to this statement, 
as follows: 

Badger declined 30 per cent., bear 40, 
beaver 50, dogmat 50, ermine 40, fisher 
35, fitch 65, Australian fox 15, cross fox 
45, red fox 25, silver fox 35, white fox 
50, kolinsky 50 lynx 40, marmot 75, mar- 
ten 25, mink 40, mole 60, muskox 50, 
muskrat 50, American opossum 65, Aus- 
tralian opossum 50, ringtail opossum 65, 
otter 35, raccoon 20, Russian sable 35, 
hair seal 50, wolf 50, skunk 40, squirrel 
40, Persian, krimmer, shiras and Thibet 
lamb robes, no comparison, as none were 
on sale last year. 

But notwithstanding this decline, it is 
stated that the prices obtained were from 
10 to 25 per cent, higher than those of 
the New York auction sale, and at least 
10 to 15 per cent, higher than the prices 
prevailing in the fur market in the month 
of December last, when the situation 
may be said to have approached a crisis. 
Not since the year 1878 has there been 
so unsettled a time in the history of the 
fur trade, and it is confidently expected 
that conditions will improve materially 
from now on. 

The holding of the Canadian and Am- 
erican sales has had the effect of stabil- 
izing the market materially, and it may 
safely be said that the element of specu- 
lation has at last vanished from the in- 
dustry, which is once more upon a sound 
basis. 

The Spring Sale 

A spring sale to be held in April or 
May next is announced by the Canadian 
Fur Auction Sales Company at which 
the present season's catch will be fea- 
tured. It is believed that all stocks rep- 
resenting a previous season's trapping 
have now been disposed of at the various 
auctions, and, as was the case at the 
recent Montreal sale, fresh skins only 
will be available from now on. 

Of peculiar interest at this time is the 
announcement of a recent enactment in- 
troduced and passed by the Quebec Leg- 
islature for the preservation of furred 



animals in that province. According to 
the Hon. J. E. Perrault, Minister of Col- 
onization, Mines and Fisheries, there has 
been a regular slaughter of beaver, 
muskrat and otter during the last few 
years and it is in the interest of trap- 
pers and hunters, as well as of the fur 
trade and public in general, that there 
should be further restrictions. At the 
present time the killing of beaver and 
otter is allowed from the first of Novem- 
ber to the first of April, but under the 
new act, killing will be from November 
1 to December 15 only. This will un- 
doubtedly have an appreciable effect on 
prices. 

As regards muskrats, the bill provides 
that it win be legal to catch them only 
from March 15 to May 1, thus eliminat- 
ing the fall trapping. During the last 
three years no fewer than 642,000 musk- 
rats have been killed, of which 261,000 
have been killed during the last year. 

An average of 50,000 beavers were 
killed in the last three years, and the 
purpose of the bill is to prevent the 
complete destruction of this animal. 

A clause of the bill provides that no 
rifles will be allowed in any lumber 
camps, and owners of camps will be held 
responsible for the enforcement of this 
regulation. Those who send pelts into 
the province must add to their packages 
a sworn declaration of their origin. 

Had this bill been passed a week ear- 
lier it would have had an appreciable 
effect upon prices obtained at the fur 
auction. 

In commenting upon the future situ- 
ation, a prominent dealer stated to Dry 
Goods Review that there appears to be 
no hope of reducing the costs of manu- 
facture, since labor, overhead charges 
and furrier's supplies are yet at the top- 
most peak. When it is remembered that 
muskrat is now about $2.20 and the cost 
of sealing averages 30 cents a skin for 
the seventy or more pelts required in the 
manufacture of an average coat, it will 
be seen that after all the labor incidental 
to piecing, sewing and finishing the gar- 
ment is considered, a Hudson seal coat 
cannot be sold under $300. This point, 
of course, is not understood by the public 
and might be used to advantage in retail 
advertising. 

Summer Furs 

As regards the outlook for summer 
furs, Dry Goods Review is informed that 
a large demand is anticipated by the 
more exclusive stores for white, cross, 
and silver fox furs. A preference for 
the better grade marten neckpieces, espe- 
cially in smaller sizes, is also looked for, 
but dealers are not concentrating upon 
the manufacture of large reserve stocks, 



feeling that the wisest course will be to 
make up as the demand comes. The 
wearing of summer furs, more especially 
at the seaside resorts, where some kind 
of protection is needed against cool 
breezes, is now an established custom 
and one which is increasing in view of 
the lowered cost of furs. Whereas silver 
fox was once the pride of the million- 
aire's wife, it is now easily within the 
reach of the more moderate income. In 
fact, according to the more exclusive 
furriers, instead of storing their expen- 
sive neckpieces from April to November, 
smart women are now having them in- 
sured and taking them to the country or 
seaside for everyday wear. Therefore, it 
is safe to anticipate a normal demand 
for the summer neckpiece during the 
next few months. 

As regards the leading pelt for next 
winter, it is stated that Hudson seal will 
again lead, especially for young women. 
Persian lamb will be in demand for ma- 
trons as the supply of pelts is now in- 
creasing. Designers are now in Paris 
gathering ideas for next winter's fur 
styles. 

In a preliminary bulletin giving sta- 
tistics on the fur-bearing industry in 
Canada, issued by the Dominion bureau 
of statistics, the value of the fur-bearing 
industry in the year 1919 is placed at 
$3,968,591. There were 414 fur farms in 
operation, including 249 in Prince Ed- 
ward Island, 48 in Nova Scotia, 21 in 
New Brunswick, 52 in Quebec, 10 in On- 
tario, 1 in Manitoba, 1 in Saskatchewan, 
11 in Alberta, 8 in British Columbia and 
13 in the Yukon. 

The number of silver foxes on farms 
was 6,433 with a total value of $3,013,115. 
Of the total number of silver foxes 
Prince Edward Island possessed 4,704, 
Nova Scotia 361, New Brunswick 472, 
Quebec 318, Ontario 120, the prairie 
provinces 280, British Columbia 65 and 
the Yukon 113. 




BERNARD BLUNT COMING TO CAN- 
ADA AS FUR OFFICIAL 

A recent cable from London states 
that Bernard Blunt, managing director 
of A. & M. Nesbitt, is to sail on the 
Olympic, on March 9, to become assist- 
ant president of the Montreal Fur 
Auction. 

Bidding on the London Fur Auction 
has improved enormously since the first 
week's fiasco. 

Mr. Blunt says Hudson Bay's high- 
grade Canadian offerings as the back- 
bone of the sale proved the turning 
point. Skunk, opossum, raccoon found 
their true values and will begin rising. 
Muskrats must come lower. Foxes sold 
poorly, except silver and white. The 
Germans alone took the red. Feeling 
in the market is much better and manu- 
facturers consider that the lowest point 
has been passed, and are now beginning 
to buy. 

Mr. Blunt intends working for close 
co-operation between Montreal and 
London. 



FUR D E P A R'T MENT 



Dry Goods Review 



FURS 

and 

FUR COATS 




Largest assortment of Fur Coats in Can- 
ada at the very lowest prices. 

Smartest styles, superior skins, exquisite 
trimmings. 

Samples sent upon request. 

Desparois, Garneau 6c Co. 

LIMITED 

465 St. Paul Street West 

MONTREAL 



Now as Never Before— 

You Need Sound 
Financial Information 



T 



HERE never was a time when 
business merchants needed sound, 
sane, financial knowledge of com- 
mercial happenings on which to base 
present and future investments as they 
do right now. 

For your business profits are riot real 
profits until you have them safely in- 
vested in reliable securities. 

Why not invest profits from your 
shop and the coupons from your Vic- 
tory Bonds in genuine securities, news 
of which you will find every week in 
THE FINANCIAL POST Investors' 
Enquiry Service, a feature for sub- 
scribers which will give you the benefit 
of investigators in all the big financial 
centres? This service is just as if you 
paid a man $10,000 a year to be your 
own personal investigator in Toronto, 
Montreal, Winnipeg — in fact, every 
city in the Dominion. 

But you cannot hire the services of 
this staff — you get them free with a 
subscription to THE FINANCIAL 
POST, through this splendid Investors' 
Enquiry Service, which is free to all 
readers. 

But that is not the only thing — this 
commercial newspaper gives you the 
financial, industrial, banking news of 
the country in convenient readable 
form — just the data you need for your 
business — just the facts you need for 
your investments — in fact, a splendid 
partner of the ambitious merchant. 

When 8,425 merchants, business 
executives, bankers, lawyers find in 
THE FINANCIAL POST the verv 
facts which will help them in their 
business, will you not find a weekly 
reading of its pages very beneficial? 

THE FINANCIAL POST 

143-153 University Ave., Toronto, Ont. 



.192 



THE FINANCIAL POST, 

143-153 University Ave., Toronto. 
On the understanding that THE FINAN- 
CIAL POST contains just the facts I need for 
safe investment of profit, you may send me a 
recent issue. 



Name . . 
Address 



Dry Goods Revit w 



FUR DEPARTMENT 



7'. • 



H 




J) 



PERSIAN 
LAMB 
COATS 



JVe have them once more! 



Cummings & Cummings 



St. Paul and St. Sulpice 
MONTREAL 



PERSIAN 

LAMB 

SKINS 



We have a complete assortment, 
all curls, original bales, matched 
bundles and single skins. 



r^ 



E 



Dry Goods Review 



Bathing Suits and Sweaters 

Exclusive Designs for Fashionable Resort Wear Reflect Modes That Will Prevail as the Season 

Approaches Holiday Time — Smart Tuxedos Lead — Pullovers Featured in Fancy 

Fabrics — Costumes Suggest "Beach" Suit Styles. 



WITH half the world going South 
to meet Summer and the other 
half anxiously awaiting its ar- 
rival at home, interest in the sweater 
coat, the bathing suit and kindred knit- 
ted lines is at high ebb, and the mer- 
• chant who is alive to the situation will 
do well to consider the sales possibilities 
of the moment. As has been frequently 
emphasized in these pages, the sweater 
coat is no longer to be regarded as a 
more or less optional accessory — it is 
one of the main essentials of the well- 
equipped wardrobe, and as such must 
be chosen with the same care and 
discrimination as the Spring suit or the 
tea gown, the new chapeau or the short 
vamped pump. And in this respect even 
greater consideration should be spent 
on the sweater, for the fact that when 
a sweater is ugly or unbecoming it is 
very much more so than any other item 
of attire. There is as much importance 
in the line and color of a tuxedo as there 
is in the grace of a dinner gown, and 
realizing this, the merchant should see 
that elegance marks the sweater dis- 
play. 



All too often the swea'.er depai ,ment 
gives the impression of a futurist ruin- 
bow — coats, pull-overs and tie-backs are 
piled one upon the other in stacks on 
open counters, and the sale price boldly 
exhibited. The consequence is that the 
shoppers swoop down upon the tables, 
maul the merchandise and transform the 
futurist rainbow into a crazy kaleido- 
scope. The jumble of colors has a very 
unpleasant effect upon the customer who 
is looking for something pretty — a;:d, 
of course, sales fall off, for the impres- 
sion is conveyed to the woman of ex- 
clusive taste that the store has abso- 
lutely nothing distinctive. 

Suitable Display 

Such an unfortunate state of affairs 
could easily be remedied. For instance, 
the high-priced silk and wool or fabric 
models could be displayed neatly in 
closed or covered cases hung on proper 
coat hangers over a central rod. The 
less expensive models could be displayed 
on the models provided, and on tables 
arranged so that colors and styles will 
not clash. The sweater for the juvenile 



should have an appealing setting, the 
model for sports wear in the South 
should be advertised as such even in 
the department, and the regular lines 
should be represented as such without 
pretence. All this can be easily accom- 
plished if the buyer in the knit goods 
department is allowed to have sufficient- 
equipment, his proper share of the win- 
dow displays, and, of course, a first- 
hand knowledge of his store's needs. 

This is the season when the knit goods 
department should be getting particular 
attention — stock your department with 
attractive models, for they will be need- 
ed before many weeks go by. 

Styles for Spring and Summer 

The tuxedo is the model of the hour, 
and the "feather" trimming — effected by 
a process of looping the wool and 
"crimping" it so that the feathered ef- 
fect is permanently retained in spite of 
weather conditions — is one of the lead- 
ing novelty features. So great has be- 
come the vogue of the tuxedo line in 
these smart garments that the whole 
neckwear industry has felt its influence, 



illlllUllllllhl! ihlllll 1 1 J I > : : 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 ; ) I h 1 1 1 1 1 1 : 1 L 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 .< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 h 1 1 i I r ; I M I ■ 1 1 , 1 1 1 L 1 1 . 1 1 - 1 1 I ■ 1 1 , 1 1 ■ I . ■ : : I ' I I ! I : : I : I ' : I 1 1 ! ! ■ ■ , I < III. I , ' : ; i I I I . ! -I I . ! ^ I : " i i ■ I ! : - ■ : ; 




Sweaters 
For Spring 

Two charming new 
Tuxedo models being 
shown for the Spring 
trade by the Monarch 
Knitting Company, Ltd., 
of Dunnville. Note the 
short hip line, the set-in 
sleeve and belted effect 
over the vestee. 




"Mil'lliMlllMlllilllillin I ' 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 !.' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 ;! I IJ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M M 1 1 1 1 M M 1 1 1 1 1 Mil: : 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 < 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - < i ' I M 1 J I 'II MM,- 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



81 



and now vestees and tuxedo collars art 
being designed especially to be worn 
with silk and wool models, in lace or- 
gandie and net. The sports skirt of 
Canton crepe, the tuxedo jacket of silk, 
and the vestee and collar of point Venice 
is one of the prettiest toute ensemble 
that Dame Fashion has provided in 
many a season. It is destined for a 
remarkable run, and all the more likely 
is its continued vogue when it is con- 
sidered that not only a few, but all of 
the season's exquisite color range may 
be adapted to its use. A sweater may 
be black or it may be henna; it may be 
be navy or it may be jade; it may be 
azure blue, champagne or sunset rose — 
every color has its appeal, and every 
color may be worn at some time or 
other. 

At the fashionable resorts novelty 
materials also are being used for 
sweaters — alpaca and Canton crepe be- 
ing introduced and smartly girdled with 
cords in place of self girdles or con- 
trasting shades of wool, silk or fabric. 
The cord girdle is very smart and 
achieves the note that is different — and 
therefore desired. Tuxedos, also, ex- 
ploit consistently the long sleeve, the 
narrow, flat belt or the flat-braided 
girdle. 

In pull-over styles which are only 
prominently featured in novelty fabrics 
now for fashionable sports wear, many 
smart innovations are introduced with 
the idea of appeal to the very youthful 
devotee. Cord girdles are shown, quaint 
embroidered motifs are introduced, and 
the most attractive outlines of neck and 
front closing followed. High-necked 
puU-overs are fashionable on the other 
side for the flapper age and dark colors 
prevail in such models. Grey, navy, tan 
and dark brown and black are the lead- 
ing colors for this type of garment, 
which is decidedly practical and ex- 
tremely chic when worn by the very 
young girl. Rust colors and copper 
tints, too, are very pretty for some of 
the slip-on models, while white, of course, 
is universally shown in silk and brushed 
wool for the Summer resorts of Winter. 

New York shops are featuring sweat- 
ers in their early Spring displays. 

In New York Shops 

Several silk models, both in the tux- 
edo and slip-on styles, were displayed re- 
cently in the windows of Bunwit, Teller 
& Co. They were shown in white, in 
the darker shade of rust that is almost 
brown, and in the bright tones of sal- 
mon. One tuxedo number was in orchid. 
All of these models had a slightly 
elaborated weave that is combined with 
a plain weave in the collars and cuffs, 
and as an edging band; and it was in- 
teresting to note that the fringed tie 
belts on the tuxedo numbers were con- 
siderably wider than those shown on the 
slip-ons. 

Two models of similar shades of yel- 
low, but of very different styles, were 
shown in a side window at Franklin 
Simon & Co.'s, together with some other 
sports toggery. They were both of silk, 
one in slip-on of a close, plain weave, 




Fashionable "Undies' 



Left: The new "Petti-bockers" of natural shantung with vivid green trimmings. 
Right: An underskirt of striking appearance in fine glove silk of peacock blue, with 
pleated flounce of the same shade and black in large check effect. — Courtesy John 
B. Hutchins Co., Ltd., Toronto. 



having a high, round neck that is self- 
bound and the other was of a more elab- 
orate weave in a tuxedo model, with the 
collars and cuffs of brushed silk in a 
tobacco brown that contrasted most ef- 
fectively with the lemon yellow of the 
sweater. 

The American manufacturers of bath- 
ing suits are also introducing many un- 
usual effects in the models designed for 
beach wear. 

Almost all of the prevailing styles 
noted in the frocks of to-day are repre- 
sented in the assortment of bathing 
suits in silk and Venitia that are being 
shown by the Beach Bathing Suit Co. 
These include suits on the surplice order 
which, crossing and frequently tying at 
the side, are most effective, together 
with the straight line or chemise type, 
and also the models with the long waist- 
line and the full short skirt attached. 

These, of course, are the outstanding 
types with many variations in the way 
of inserts and scallops, side panels and 
slashing. Bright tones, when they are 
not used in the development of the suit 
itself, generally appear in the trimming. 
Velvet suits are also noted, these usually 
simple in line, either straight or with a 
long waist and often shown with bright 
tone piping or colored novelty belts. One 



model of chiffon velvet noted has side 
panels of satin with stripe of blue ap- 
pliqued, and the blue tone in satin out- 
lining the square neck and the armholes. 

The use of taffeta as a trimming for 
satin is remarked, bands of green edg- 
ing the skirt of one model and also ap- 
pearing on the straight full tights with 
a narrow line of gold at the edge. 

Called the flame suit, is a brilliant 
satin model with a straight waist and 
a short, full skirt with a band of gold 
and flame satin flowers at the waistline 
in front and one flower also appearing 
on the left shoulder. 

The majority of these models are 
sleeveless, although several are shown 
with a kimono effect extending slightly 
over the shoulder. Some have sleeves 
invariably slashed and faced in contrast. 

This is the way a brilliant toned plaid 
taffeta is treated with the collar and 
cuffs of white taffeta, and the paneled 
front, which forms an apron effect, but- 
toned with novelty buttons and tying 
in surplice style in back. Another plaid 
model is in surplice style outlined in the 
brilliant red tone that appears in the 
plaid. This ties in a large bow at the 
side and a bow of red appears at one 
shoulder. 



82 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 









Make Sure it's 



*4' 



> ■ * - 




Priscilla Quality 

If you are looking for woollen goods that have 
the quality which makes sales with the best 
customers and yet is within the means of 
modest purses, stock Priscilla Quality 

Children's Woollen Garments 

Our factory facilities have been increased and 
improved. The previous high standard in- 
dicated by the name "Priscilla Quality" has 
been carried a step higher. Make sure you get 
the real Priscilla Quality. 



HENRY DAVIS & CO., Ltd., 259 Spadina Ave., TORONTO 



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CLIFT & GOODRICH, Inc. 



328-330 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 



Hosiery 
Bathing Suits 
Knit Underwear 
Nainsook Underwear 
Men's Cotton Sweaters 



Commission 
Merchants 

to the 

Jobbing Trade 
Exclusively 



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KNITTED GOODS 



83 



^■M|B| 




Sturdy Stockings/or Sturdy Youngsters 




HERE are stockings that will 
readily sell during the winter — 
strong, durable — stockings that will 
stand the harshest treatment. 

Cold weather has no terrors for 
Sonny when he wears Rock Rib or 
Hercules stockings. Mother has no 
qualms when she lets him out to 
play in the snow. 

Rock Rib and Hercules Stockings 
are closely knit from extra long yarn, 
with a double-ply leg and three-ply 
heel and toe. 



Their durable construction saves 
much darning and makes the mend- 
ing basket lighter. 

Sizes 5 to 10^. In boxes of one 
dozen pairs. 

Princess stockings are excellent for the 
girls. Made from two-ply English Lisle 
yarn. These stockings are hard wearing, 
and have a most attractive appearance. 
Sizes 4J4 to io. 

Your customers will be interested in 
these stockings. Make a point of displaying 
them in your windows and on your counters. 



ROCK MB HERCULES 
PRINCESS 



J3oj?& and Girls 




The Chipman-Holton Knitting Company, Limited, Hamilton, Ontario 



Mills at Hamilton and Welland, Ont. 



84 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 



Real S 



uccess is 



Built on Faith 



We have whole-hearted faith in our merchandise 
and in the success of our customers. 

The increasing use of the products of our Plant 
reflects this faith in all who'make, handle or wear 
OXFORD Underwear. 




Be Sure to See 
Our Spring Range ! 




Oxford 

Men's Underwear 



has shared largely in the creation of that 
faith. 

Sterling value — strictly tailored form- 
fitting lines — unusual comfort features 
— special reinforcements for longer wear 
— all have been combined to produce 
an entirely satisfactory line. 

As well as the natural color, we make 
Men's Underwear in pink, sky blue and 
black. 

SOME OTHER OXFORD LINES 
FOR WOMEN 

Fancy Evening Vests in wide variety of dainty designs, 
among them the "Interchangeable," a Novelty Vest with 
unique features. Athletic Underwear, Bloomers, Children's 
Combinations, Jerseys, Bathing Suits. 



THE OXFORD KNITTING COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Woodstock - - Ontario 



T. H. WARDELL, 
24 Aikins Block, Winnipeg. 



Representatives : 

H. R. BLADE, 
Carleton Chambers, Ottawa. 



F. W. McLEAN, 
5 Paddock St., St. John, N.B. 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 






MO N A R C H - K N I T 



Monarch Yarns 

For Profit and Satisfaction 




Book 

No. 6 

Ready 

March 

1st. 

Send 
Your 
Order 
Now. 



MONARCH YARNS are not 
made to sell "at a price." 
They are constructed to pro- 
duce a garment which will give en- 
tire and lasting satisfaction. Like 
all Monarch-Knit products, Monarch 
yarns are guaranteed. 

Sell Monarch Yarns and you will 
sell more yarn. Our long experience 
in producing machine-made goods 
enables us to produce a yarn of ex- 
actly the right weight and character 
for all varieties of hand-knitting. 

Distinct Advantages 

of 

Monarch Yarns 

"Art in Knitting Monarch Yarns," 
No. 6, will contain nearly 60 dif- 
ferent styles, a great many of them 
illustrated in colors, with full and 
clear directions for making each one. 

This big, interesting, suggestive book 
costs your customer only 25c. She 
takes it home, selects styles at her 
leisure. She shows it to her friends. 
They also are interested. Nearly 
every book will make new yarn buy- 
ers. It is working for yov)- every 
minute. 



Sell Monarch Yarns 
and Monarch Style Books 

It Pays You Best of All 

The Monarch Knitting Co. 



Limited 



Head Office : DUNNVILLE, ONT. 



85 
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Factories at : Dunnville, St. Thomas and St. Catharines, Ont.,'and Buffalo, N.Y. 



m 



V A R N S 




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KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 



MONARCH-KNIT 



w 

E 
A 
T 
E 
R 
5 



What's Best in Hosiery? 

The Answer Is: — See the Range of 

Monarch-Knit 

For Fall 1 92 1 




A SPLENDID range of silk 
and mercerized hosiery, in 
all the popular colors, for men 
and women. 

Double-soles, high spliced 
heels, shapely ankles, fashion- 
able mock seam and fashioning, 
and elastic ribbed tops, all com- 
bine to give the fit, finish and 
wearing qualities demanded by 
your particular customers. 

Place Your 
Order Now 

We have a splendid assortment of 
goods in stock. On all sorting orders, 
therefore, we are able to give imme- 
diate delivery. Anticipate your re- 
quirements now. 




The Monarch Knitting Co., Limited 

Head Office : DUNNVILLE, ONT. 

Factories at : Dunnville, St. Thomas and St. Catharines, Ont., and Buffalo, N.Y. 



& 



YARNS 



E 

R 
Y 









Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 




S 

W 
E 
A 
T 
E 
R 
5 



M O N ARCH-KNIT 



Monarch - Knit 




For|Men, Women and Children 



VfOU will find all the newest 
■* styles in the Monarch-Knit 
range for Fall 192 1. And, as 
usual, this range will appeal 
to you as being the best on the 
market. In style, fit, finish 
and value Monarch-Knit 
maintains its lead. 

We commend especially to 
your attention our fine silk 
knitted coats for women ; wor- 
sted sweater coats for men, 
women and children ; men's 
and boys' jerseys ; stylish bath- 
ing suits for men, women and 
children. Be sure to see the 
Monarch-Knit range before 
you place your order. 






The Monarch Knitting Co., Limited 

Head Office : DUNNVIIXE, ONT. 

Factories at : Dunnville, St. Thomas and St. Catharines, Ont., and Buffalo, N.Y. 



YARNS 



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lv JN 1 1 T & D UUUUS 



Dry Goods Review 




Individuality 

is shown in every line of this white 

Burritt Sweater Coat 

with its novel "feather" trimming- and knitted 
heading of yellow wool. 

And it's only ONE of a wide choice of clever 
styles in the Spring showing of 

Burritt Sweater Coats 

now in the hands of our Travellers. 

Good buyers will quickly appreciate the 
"quality" feel and weight of these Sweaters 
and the distinctiveness of the styles. 

Made in all combinations of colors. 
Be sure to see them! 

A. Burritt & Co. 

Mitchell, Ont. 

Established 1875 
Manufacturers of Sweaters, Pure Camel Hair Men's 
Seamless Gloves, Pullovers, Toques, Boys' and Men's 
Ribbed Worsted Hosierv. 



HAROLD F. WATSON, FOSTER, LTD. 

208 Constine Bldg., Montreal 

CANADIAN AGENTS for the far-famed and highly esteemed 

"MOYER-MAID" SWISS RIBBED VESTS 

for 

Women, Misses and Children 

You can start your customers buying again — when you can offer them 
quality merchandise at reasonable prices. 

"Moyer-Maid" is vest value unduplicated. Quality of fabric, master work- 
manship, perfect fit and finish are virtues which make "Moyer-Maid" par- 
ticularly profitable in these days of careful buying. 



Manufactured by 

Walter W.Moyer 
Ephrata, Pa. 







Prompt 

attention to all 

orders 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



89 




Whether she looks at Hosiery 



As a thing of beauty — 

Or an article of apparel that must stand 
more hard treatment than any other — 

Or both— 

your customer will place all her faith 
§= in — 

Jjurritt s Oilt JnLosiery 

The first glance proves its desirability 
from point of beauty! Long wear proves 
its sturdy qualities and perfect-fitting lines! 

COLORS 

White, Black, Navy, Tan, Cordovan, Grey, 
Beaver, Champagne. 

Also a fine line of Burritt Lisle Hosiery. 
All Silk and Lisle Hosiery attractively boxed. 

A. Burritt & Co. 

Mitchell, Ont. 

Established 1875. 

Manufacturers of Sweaters, Pure Camel Hair Men's 

Seamless Gloves, Pullovers, Toques, Boys' and 

Men's Ribbed Worsted Hosiery. 








Prized By Dealer 
And Customer Alike 

TJNDERWEAR— to fulfil its mission 
*"^ and bring satisfaction to both 
dealer and consumer — should be of last- 
ing satisfaction to the first, and pro- 
ductive of ample profits for the second. 

Dealers everywhere are learning that 
Atlantic Underwear admirably fills 
both these requirements. 

Sold in five different weights and 
qualities. Each line is guaranteed 
to be the best value of its class. 




UNSHRINKABLE 

The Underwear 
ihat Overyears 

ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR, Limited 
MONCTON - - N.B. 



L'S 



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KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Revieic 






x: 



I 



I 



I 



x 




What Counts These Days! 



The "New Mode" 

As Illustrated 

A Special Harvey number with fea- 
ture; that are different. 

The drop-seat combination that 
lias proven so popular. Suits any 
style of Corset. 

Harrey "Undies * for Babies 

embrace a wide selection of clever 
designs in soft, cosy garments — 
-bowing certain ''baby" features that 
mean greater comfort, warmth ami 
health. 



The public in its present 
mood is willing to pay only 
for goods which it knows and 
has confidence in. 

Unnamed or unknown 
merchandise has to be thrown 
on the bargain counter to be 
moved. 

This is the time when 
stores whose stocks consist 
principally of standard, eas- 
ily sold goods, congratulate 
themselves on their fore- 
sight, 

Such is the satisfaction of 
the merchant who has been 
concentrating on 

Harvey 
Underwear 




Harvey Knitting Company 

Limited 
Woodstock - Ontario 



X 






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Dry Goods Review . KNITTED GOODS 

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i 

i 



Is it any wonder that 
Jersey Cloth 

is so popular [? 



HAWTHORN Jersey Cloth has won its way 
through an exceptional list of points in its 
favor. 

First of all, it presents a fine, soft fin- 
ish, yet its sturdiness cannot be excelled. 
Through this finish it is adaptable to all 
styles and effects. Further, it does not 
wrinkle, bulge or get shiny as other 
fabrics do so readily. 

Then in the immense range of appealing 
colors — colors that are fast! — and beau- 
tiful mixtures— HAWTHORN JERSEY 
CLOTH supplies the needed variety to 
suit all tastes. 





Jersey Cloth 

is a Staple ! 

The steady and growing de- 
mand necessitates its place 
side by side with serge and 
other fabrics on the mer- 
chant's shelf. 

The best clothing manufac- 
turers have attractive gar- 
ments available in this cloth 
for your Ready-to- Wear Dept. 



HAWTHORN MILLS LIMITED 

WOOLLEN MANUFACTURERS 

CARLETON PLACE, ONTARIO 

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91 

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99 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 



A 1921 Style Hit 

From the Ballantyne Range 




R. 



In figuring the prices of Ballantyne Knit Goods for 1921, we have not only 
worked on a basis of prevailing lower prices for materials, but we have provided 
for a still further decrease in our production costs. The result is — prices which, 
coupled with Ballantyne Styles and Quality, will enable you to give the best 
of value in your knit goods department. 

Tf the Ballantyne representative has not already called on you, he is on his way. 

M. BALLANTYNE, LIMITED 

STRATFORD, CANADA 



^Announcing 

our new line of 

All Wool Underwear 
Finer- softer** more 
elastic j 

Especially 
Suited for 
Union Suits 



r* \ ""! 





OTTAWA. 



VAXLEY 




Is manufactured by Bates & Innes.Limited, Carleton Place. 
And sold only through the Wholesale Trade. 

Bates & Inneslimited- Carleton Place,Ont. 



I' 4 



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Look for 




this Trade Mark 



HANDLING LINES THAT PAY 

Far-seeing retailers look above and beyond the mere margin of profit to be made on merchandise. Other 
factors in selling are of paramount importance. 

First and foremost among these is confidence in the lines handled. A reputation for selling only goods of 
known high quality is not built up in a day. And no merchant can acquire this kind of a reputation unless 
he has absolute confidence in the merchandise he offers to his customers. 

In the long run the line that pays is the one that eventually brings the customer back for more. That's 
why an increasingly large number of wise retailers are stocking and recommending our 

JERSEYS for Men and Boys 

They always beget confidence in the selling. You can offer our JERSEYS with the assurance that there 
is nothing better on the market to offer. 

Positively All Wool 



Not one ounce of Cotton in our Factory. Attractive color combinations. 

Fast colors — snug-fitting — tailored finish. Shoulder-fastening or Pullovers for Boys. 

V Neck and Pullovers for Men 



Children's 

Knitted 

Suits 

Plain 

Colors 



Spring and Fall Ranges now with Travellers 

JERSEY'S LIMITED 

455 King St. W. - Toronto 



Bathing 

Suits 

For Men 

and 

Women 




/mtumm 




THE PURE WOOL 



The "CEETEE SHEEP" trade mark is 
what your best customers look for when 
buying wool underclothing — there is only 

one grade and that the highest. y ■ - 

Turnbull's underwear, which competes with every other manufactured in U N U t K C LUTH I NQ 

ida, sells on merit and every garment is backed by 60 years' experience— THAT WILL NOT SHRINK 

it is made in all weights — sizes and prices to suit every require- 
ment — and bears the diamond-shaped label as illustrated. 

The C. Turnbull Co. of Gait, Ontario 

Also Manufacturer* of Turnbull's Ribbed Underwear for Ladies and 
Children and Turnbull's " M " Bands for Infants. 





THIS 
TRADEMARK 



IS ON EVERY 
GARMENT 



CEETEE 



CEETEE 



WOOLLENS 



53 years in 
service is your 
guarantee of 
satis fac tion 



o x 



FO 



again lead in quality and origin- 
ality of designs and handsome col- 
orings. Ask our Representative to 
show you our wide ranges in 33 
oz. HALF BLOOD OVERCOAT- 
INGS, highly napped and in Eng- 
lish Effect— also our Spring 1921 
SUITINGS for both Men's and Wo- 
men's Wear — smart and distinc- 
tive. 



Oxford, N.S. 



Manufacturing Co., 
Ltd. 




All Wool Blankets 

(SCOTCH and ENGLISH) 
at greatly reduced prices 

6-7-8 lbs., price $1 60 to $1.80 per lb. 
Can give immediate shipment from stock 

All Wool Flannels 

White 85c to $1.40 per yard 

Scarlet 93c to $1.10 per yard 

Natural 97c per yard 

We have revised prices on all 
stock goods. If not on our mail- 
ing list, please write. 

John E. Ritchie 

Dry Goods Commission Agent, 
591 St. Catherine St. W., MONTREAL. 



Branches : 

543 Granville St., 

VANCOUVER 



29 Minshull St., 
MANCHESTER, Eng 



Qry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



95 



" They Sell 
the Best Hosiery 
in Town 





This is the reputation most deal- 
ers strive for, realizing the won- 
derful publicity value of the 
pleased customer. 

Fastidious men and women are 
requiring Circle-Bar Hosiery in 
greater quantity each year. They 
like the tapering toe, the extra 
heel depth (making for perfect fit 
over instep), the narrowed ankle, 
and the elastic top. 



Be the wise man of your community- 
CIRCLE-BAR HOSIERY. 



-sell 



Our representatives are now on their way 
with Cashmere Lines for Fall, 1921, and 
Silks for delivery up to June 30th this year. 
—IT IS TO YOUR INTEREST TO SEE 
THEM. 



The Circle-Bar Knitting Co. 

LIMITED 
Head Office: Kincardine, Ontario 




HOSIERY. 



Mills at Kincardine and Owen Sound, Ontario 






Dry Goods Review 



The Ways of Spring Lingerie 

Petti-bloomer in Attractive Range of Styles Vies With Glove Silk Petticoat for Spring 

Favors — Accordion Pleated Flounces, Front Fastenings and Excellent Adjustment 

of Fullness Characterize New Silk Lines in Underskirts. 



ONE of the outstanding features of 
lingerie buying at present, ac- 
cording to a Toronto manufac- 
turer, is the demand that has recently 
arisen for the "Petti-bloomer." Some 
choose to call it the "Petti-bocker" and 
others the "Pantalette," as it, was known 
in the olden days. 

Orders are being received in notice- 
able quantities for this garment from 
the Canadian trade, and if the orders 
are small in most cases — showing that 
it is being tried out — the number of 
small orders proves the general interest 
being shown. To meet this demand many 
novel effects are being shown that make 
the modern "Petti-bocker" quite a dif- 
ferent proposition from the old-fash- 
ioned "Pantalette." Noticeable are the 
numbers in navy blue, which are de- 
signed to be worn with the ever-popular 
navy suit, and other dark shades to 
match the suit. The pastel shades are 
all widely represented also, with dainty 
results. Glove silk, satin, Jap silk, or 
Shantung silk, as illustrated, are all be- 
ing employed in these garments. Un- 
like the bloomer, the elastic comes just 
below the knee, allowing the pleated 
flounce to hang from that point. Dis- 
tinctive effects are obtained by different 
treatments of this flounce, in applying 
lace or ribbon, also by touches on the 
garment proper of lace, lace medallions, 
hemstitching, contrasting bands or tiny 
rose buds. 

The fact that this garment does away 
with the necessity of wearing an under- 
skirt no doubt contributes largely to its 
growing popularity. Greater freedom of 
movement and the absence of the an- 
noying "bunching" of the underskirt at 
the knee are in its favor. 

Underskirts Are Lovely 

Notwithstanding the interest shown in 
its opposition, the "Petti-bocker," there 
is an immense run reported on under- 
skirts at the present time. Jap silk seems 
to be the most favored material, but 
glove silk, satin, Japanese jersey silk, 
are being shown in wide ranges, along 
with a few numbers in taffeta. An ac- 
cordion pleated 8 inch or 10 inch flounce 
seems to be the popular style of the mo- 
ment, and these flounces are diversified 
in many ways by applying narrow rib- 
bon in striking designs, or by combina- 
tions of contrasting shades in unique 
designs, one of which is illustrated. An 
underskirt buyer for a Toronto house 
on his return recently from New York 
states that over there the underskirts are 
now beiriK made with a front fastening, 
while his house in Toronto have always 




used this fastening. The underskirt is 
fastened afe the left front, with a dome 
fastener, in the same or contrasting 
color, and there is in addition a special 
front which lies perfectly straight and 
flat, with all the fullness directed to the 
back of the garment. 

"Step-ins" Very Popular 

After enjoying a strong run on the 
other side of the border, the "Step-in" 
drawer is becoming very popular on the 
Canadian market. Spring and Summer 
will in all probability see an even greater 
demand for this garment. With elastic 
at the waist line, and the sides slashed 
up to a high point on the sides, this 
garment resembles nothing so much as 
two small aprons fastened together at 
the top of the sides, and caught again at 
the centre of the lower edge for perhaps 
three or four inches. These are being 
shown entirely in the pastel shades and 
white, so far, and are made in silks, 
satins, and Jap jersey silk, with ribbon 
and lace trimmings applied in many 
dainty ways. 

Bloomers Still Going Strong 

The phenomenal demand for bloomers 
continues and from all appearances is 
likely to continue. Styles in the pastel 
shades continue very much as described 
in the January number of Dry Goods 
Review, but one number of a different 
character deserves special mention here. 
A Toronto house is showing a line of 
navy blue bloomers, in washable satin, 
with tiny pocket for milady's powder 
puff, the trimming of the garment being 
in contrasting shades of Paddy green or 
gold, or red, as desired — the contrast 
finding expression in rows of hemstitch- 
ing, bands and edges. Then there is the 
camisole to match, with the same color 
scheme, the camisole being one of those 
with shoulder straps and body of gar- 
ment all in one, the shoulder straps tap- 
ering up to a narrow point at the top. 
A set of this kind is both attractive and 
practical, and is meeting with favor 
through these points. 



Camisoles and Envelopes 

Camisoles for the greater part are 
following somewhat the same lines as 
described in January Dry Goods Review, 
with diversity of design creating the 
only real distinction of the new Spring 
numbers. Contrasting shades as trim- 
ming are very noticeable, in hemstitch- 
ing, wide and narrow bands, and touches 
of ribbon or rosebuds. One camisole had 
two rows of hemstitching about three 
inches apart at the top, with square 
filet medallions at intervals all the way 
around. At the front tiny flowers be- 
tween the medallions added a dainty 
touch. 

Envelopes are still good, although, of 
course, the present season is not the 
strongest selling season for that par- 
ticular garment. With Spring and Sum- 
mer the growing devotion of Canadian 
women to this type of undergarment will 
again be expressed emphatically, as in 
the past few seasons. One design noticed 
recently had a simple, yet very effective, 
touch in several rows of hemstitching at 
the front centre, just about four inches 
in length, with tiny rosebuds at either 
end. This hemstitching also served to 
gather in the garment at this point, and 
create an Empire effect that was clever 
and pretty. 

The athletic type of garment enjoys 
the same strong popularity, and indica- 
tions all point to the fact that it is here 
to stay. It might be safe to say that 
"undies" may come and "undies" may 
go, but "athletics" go on forever. While 
strictly tailored primarily, this type of 
garment is now being made up in such 
delightful materials, and finished in such 
a dainty way that it is winning favor 
with the fastidious dresser as well as 
she whose tastes run to the plainer 
effects. 



Fire Destroys 

Big Halifax Store 

Christmas Eve Blaze Does $600,000. Dam- 
ages in Business Block — Wood 
Bros.' Complete Loss 

The largest dry goods store in Halifax 
was totally destroyed by fire on Christ- 
mas Eve, when in less than two hours 
a number of firms within the block of 
Granville and Hollis streets were dam- 
aged to a total extent of $600,000. The 
Wood Brothers were the heaviest losers, 
though according to the statement of E. 
A. Wood, president of the company, the 
building and stocks were pretty well 
covered by insurance. 



Dry Goods Review 



97 



Planning the Corset Display 

Buyers For Corset and Brassiere Departments Should Feature the Necessity of Choosing the 
Corset Before the Costume— Make Department Worthy Setting for High Quality 

Lines Sold — Spring Business Good. 



A CORRECTLY fitted corset is the 
foundation upon which the fash- 
ionably dressed woman must rely 
for that appearance of being well gowned 
that every woman covets, and but few 
attain. 

The value of this fact as a selling 
argument is all too frequently over- 
looked by the man or woman responsible 
for the success of the store's corset de- 
partment and as a result valuable busi- 
ness is lost. How many women arrange 
for a corset fitting as the essential step 
in the selection of their Spring ward- 
robes? An astonishingly small percen- 
tage, if the truth were known, even 
among the women who profess to desire 
the most fashionable silhouette. 
Yet they are ignoring the most deter- 
mining factor in achieving this smart 
appearance by attaching only second- 
ary importance to the choosing and fit- 
ting of the corset and brassiere, over 
which not one, but all gowns and cos- 
tumes must be worn. 

Emphasize Necessity 

For this reason it behooves the head 
of the corset department to make his 
case clear to the firm, and see that his 
department is one of the first, if not the 
very first, to receive the benefit of a 
special Spring opening. Stocks should 
be carefully and attractively selected. 
There should be a corset in the depart- 
ment for every type of figure that pa- 
tronizes the store, and there should be 
the utmost care and delicacy practised 
in the. display and sale of the models. 
All attention should be focussed on the 
service rendered the customer, and the 
most reliable lines only should be carried 
— for disappoint a women once in the 
matter of a corset and her custom is lost 
for all time. 

Faultless Equipment 

Of equal importance is the impres- 
sion created by the appearance of the 
department itself, and also the deport- 
ment of the sales staff. For instance, 
the store that is willing to devote suffi- 
cient floor space to the corset and bras- 
siere department to permit of private 
fitting rooms will enjoy a better class 
trade and therefore carry a larger as- 
sortment of higher priced lines. It is 
equally true that the individual service 
given the customer who is encouraged to 
have her corset and brassiere fitted will 
inspire confidence and also educate the 
customer to the importance of this fit- 
ting. There are few women indeed who 
when the facts are pointed out to them 
will deny the folly of attempting to 




achieve a well-groomed appearance at 
the same time underestimating the part 
played by the corset as a foundation. 

Advertising Plan 

All these matters should be discussed 
in detail and worked out to the depart- 
ment's advantage, and advertising plans 
formed accordingly. The corset buyer 
should put in his request for window dis- 
plays in conjunction with the advance 
showing of the Spring modes in cos- 
tumes, wraps and frocks, so that the 
significance of the corset will be empha- 
sized to the woman who is viewing the 
merchandise shown with the idea of 
purchasing. Newspaper advertising may 
be directed along this line, and may be 
used to point out the wisdom of early fit- 
tings — before the Spring suit is pur- 
chased. 

In following this policy the corset de- 
partment will in time get the business it 
is entitled to, and will be regarded in 
its proper importance. Costumes will 
no longer be spoiled by the fact that 
they have been fitted over an old-fash- 
ioned or last season corset, and a gen- 
eral satisfaction will result to the de- 
partment and the store at large. 

If the department in your store has 
been permitted to "carry on" under the 
handicap of unattractive merchandise, 
poor equipment and inconvenient accom- 
modation, correct these features without 
delay and let a prettily arranged display, 
a few additional private fitting rooms 
and an expert corsetiere, with the as- 
sistance of an able staff, do the trick. 

As shopping goes at the present time 
corsets and brassieres are left to the 
last — the suit, the hat, the shoes, and 
even gloves, are purchased first, and if 
there is the wherewithal left the corset 
and brassiere are then considered. Why 
not reverse the situation and effect 
greater satisfaction to all concerned? A 
careful survey of the department's par- 
ticular requirements, as based on the 



store's particular following, will bring 
the sales in this department up to what 
they should be and will encourage great- 
er interest in this very essential aid to 
fashion. 

As regards the prospect of Spring 
business in these lines, report* from 
various centres show that the demand 
for well-made corsets is excellent. The 
cheaper corset — the low quality corset — 
has but few supporters, for women are 
coming to realize that while they are 
seeking lower prices they are equally 
anxious for quality and are showing that 
they are willing to pay for it. The 
corset in its 1921 form is a delightful 
work of art. It is comfortable, pliable 
and durable. Better fabrics are going 
into its manufacture, and although the 
corsetless effect is sought after, the cor- 
set is not discarded, and new low topless 
models are being introduced with con- 
siderable success. The sports corset 
the negligee corset and the evening cor- 
set are all represented, while brassieres 
and bandeaux in a wide and interesting 
assortment are selling briskly. 



NEW YORK BUYER TO N.B. 

Mrs. F. M. Norwood has been appoint- 
ed buyer and manager of the coat and 
suit department in the F. W. Daniel & 
Co., Ltd., St. John, N.B. 

Mrs. Norwood is a woman of wide ex- 
perience in this department and was for- 
merly associated with such well-known 
firms as L. P. Hollander & Co., New 
York, Hickson, of Boston, and Franklin 
Simon, New York. 



A Smart Catalogue 



One of the finest examples of modern 
art as applied to •merchandising is the 
newly-issued Spring catalogue of the 
Daly & Morin Co. of Lachine and Mont- 
real, Que., which is a triumph of the 
engraver's art as well as one of the 
finest compendiums of Canadian-made 
housefurnishings yet produced. 

The cover design is cleverly carried 
out in five colors and represents a win- 
dow, through which can be seen a typi- 
cally Canadian landscape, framed by the 
latest products of this well-known con- 
cern. The catalogue is profusely illus- 
trated throughout its 121 pages and the 
additional improvement of full-color re- 
productions enhances the value of the 
book greatly. The range of subjects 
covered includes curtains, draperies, 
hardware, hammocks, shades and carpet 
sweepers, etc. 



3 



( ( »RSET DEPARTMENT 



Dry Goods Review 



FROM "THE DRY GOODS ECONOMIST," NEW YORK CITY, JANUARY 8th, 1921 



Buy Corsets and Brassieres 
for Spring 

We Do Not Give Advice, But We Give 
Our Best Judgment. 

The time for waiting is past. 

If orders are not placed soon, delivery in time for Spring business 
will be impossible. 

We believe prices are settled. 

The latest price lists of Warner products are dated January 1, 1921. 
These price lists show the fourth reduction since July, 1920. They 
are based on the present market. 

The cost of corsets depends on cotton and labor. We all know 
fifteen-cent cotton cannot last. No one wishes for a radical reduction 
in the price of labor — prosperous working people are profitable cus- 
tomers. 

Any delay in buying now will imperil your Spring business. This 
is the time to buy. 



This is what we had to say in the United States. It applies equally well 
to Canada. 

Warner's Canadian-made line was first shown in January. Two Mon- 
treal accounts bought immediately — one re-ordered within five days, 
the other twice within ten days. 

In Ottawa the line was seen on a Monday. An immediate order was 
placed and Warner's Corsets were on the shelves by Friday morning. 

In Belleville the samples brought forth an order for complete stock at 
once — to be featured exclusively for popular-priced trade. 

A store in Peterboro' opened a corset department on the strength of 
the Warner line. 

All this in our first week's business. Back Lace and Front Lace, from 
$12.00 to $33.00 per dozen. Warner's Rust-proof Corsets, Made-in- 
Canada. 

First in the United States. Worn throughout the world. 

THE WARNER BROTHERS COMPANY, INC. 

OF BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 
Canadian Factory : St. Ambroise and Turgeon Streets, Montreal 



])fil Goods Review 



CO RSKT I) E I' A i; T.\l ENT 



99 



GOSSARD the word universally used by 
women to denote FRONT LACING CORSETS 



For many years Gossard advertising has 
appeared regularly in the foremost 
women's publications throughout the 
world. This has resulted in a world- 
wide acceptance of the front lacing 
principle and a universal demand for 
Gossards, the original front lacing 
corsets. 

Are you arranging to stock your shelves 
full of Gossard Corsets — a superior pro- 
duct, widely advertised and therefore 
the best known make on the market— 
or will you stock up with inferior 
merchandise, little known and unsatis- 
factory to sell? 

Money is made on Turn-Overs and lost 
on Left-Overs. 



Merchants today are finding it much 
easier than ever before to sell nationally 
advertised goods. Customers now do 
not accept anything the merchant may 
see fit to offer them. They know per- 
fectly- well what they want and will 
insist upon having it; they cannot be 
influenced to take a substitute. 

The selling of Gossard Corsets enables 
you to make a margin of profit in keep- 
ing with the times. It also enables you 
to offer every woman a continuous and 
lasting satisfaction that is sure to 
bring to y/our store an ever growing 
clientele ot permanent corset customers. 

The Canadian H. W . Gossard Co., Limited 

)66-)78 West Adelaide St., Toronto, Can. 




LOO 



CO RS ET n E PA RTMENT 



Dry Goods Review 




Back and Front L.acers and Novelty Corsets 

Woolno-Corsets are the outgrowth of 15 years' 
successful Custom-Corseting of Canadian 
Ladies. All our models are "Proved.'' 

Popular Prices 
From $12.50 to $60.00 Doz. 

Write For Samples To-day 

(Carriage paid) 

Say the prices and styles interested in. Examine 
the make and values at your leisure. Woolno- 
Corsets and values can stand the cold, critical, 
impersonal look-over. 

Better Discount For Mail Orders. 



W®®Ilnn®Giig|lln C®rg©ftS(girg 



The Counter Costume Co., Limited 

Designers and Makers of 

Misses' and Juniors' 

Dresses 



New Address: 131-139 Spadina Ave. 



Spadina Bldg. 



Western Canada: 
J. HOWARD 



TORONTO 



REPRESENTATIVES: 

City: Maritime Provinces: 

R. O. MARGRAVE W. A. TALLMIRE 

Western Ontario: R. KENNEDY 



Eastern and Northern Ontario 
A. B. COLWELL 



I) |{ V GOODS REV] E W 



101 



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1 



I 



I 

3 



1-1 1 ( I 1 ■ I ■ J I I • 






w 



<5jymng 

A renouncement 




wm 



u 



^We stand on our reputation as the 
leading Novelty House or Canada 



Veils 

veilings 

Dress Trimmings 
Laces 

Embroideries 
Beads 
JyL a lines 
Princess Pat "Human 
A/t/ Lady "Silk*' Hair Nets 



The Thompson Lace &? V eilmg Co. 

Limited 

Corner \Vellington and York Streets, Toronto 



-CM 



f 




- 



= ui]<j!iniii!iiiiii>iu:i iii mmim i;iii;iiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiwiiiiM 



105 



1UJY COOPS RK.V1KW 



^ 






You are not Spending when you are Investing ! 

The best investment in your business of merchandising- lies in the displaying of your goods 
to the very best advantage. Make your displays an inspiration to buying! Display your goods 
well and they are half sold. 

What better investment than some snappy, high-class CLATWORTHY Forms and Fixtures to 
s'c// your goods for you? A few of our many lines are -listed below. Send for catalogue 
showing complete range. 



Ready-to-Wear 



Our ''Dur Enam" Forms will meet your every re- 
quirement in the better display of Ready-to-wear 
garments of all kinds. They are absolutely perfect 
in every detail. Their high quality ensures long 
wear. 



Millinery 



CLATWORTHY Fixtures include many artistic 
and unique effects in Display Fixtures of a highly 
superior character. Different shades and effects in 
Enamel, Mahogany, Walnut and other finishes to 
harmonize with any color scheme. 



Show Window 
Decorations 



Store 
Furnishings 



Everything for the Window — including Valences, 
Forms and Fixtures of all kinds, pedestals, metal 
fixtures, mirrors, and right on down to the smallest 
accessories for successful window displays. 



Every Fixture conceivable for furnishing the store 
is included in the CLATWORTHY range. Mir- 
rors, Triple Mirrors, Floor Lamps, Pedestals, are 
but a few of our many furnishings. 



Representatives: 



Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal, Que. 



M. E. Hatt & Co., Mercantile Bids. 
- - S. J. Barley, 210 Park Ave. 



Halifax, N.S. 
Quebec - - 



----DA. Gorrie, Box 273 
Nap. Debigare, 205 Rue Des Fosses 



CLATWORTHY & SON, LIMITED 

Established 1896 TORONTO Incorporated 1908 



±r-rETTi-ri-x-i-i-rxj3C!rEr! 



DRY GOODS UK VI 1CW 



L03 





The Decorative Plateau 

i,n some'new, distinctive effects. 

Finished in Old Ivory, Old Gold, Verdi- 
Antique and Duo-Tone Finishes. 

No. 713B— SPECIFICATIONS: 

Top 12 x 22 and 
16 x 30 

Heights — 6, 12 and 18 inches 

Removable glass top. 
No. 713C— SPECIFICATIONS: 

Top 12 x 22 and 
16 x 30 

Heights — 6. 12 and 18 inches. 

Removable glass top. 
No. 713A— SPECIFICATIONS: 

Top 12 x 22 and 
16 x 30 

Heights — 6, 12 and 18 inches. 

Solid wood top. 

ARTISTIC APPEALING ADAPTABLE 
A splendid investment ! 

Our Mr. S. J. Barley, a direct Representative of the House, is 
now on a trip through Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta, 
with samples of our new lines and will call upon all the leading 
Merchants. 

CLATWORTHY & SON, LIMITED^ 

161 KING ST. W., TORONTO 




L04 



DK Y G 00 DS R E V I E W 



LIVING MODEL PHOTOGRAPHY 

For Fashion and Advertising, Compositions of All Kinds 




The above is a reproduction from "Kassab Lingerie" by 

PHOTO-KRAFT STUDIOS, LIMITED 

Formerly UNDERWOOD & UNDERWOOD, LIMITED 
60 St. Matthew St., Telephone Uptown 7861, MONTREAL 



DRY GOODS I! K V I K W 



!LMMii i MiiMiiiMMn»nrTxir»xirxTinmrijrjxgjj ar 




New Veils 

for 

Spring 

as Illustrated 
No. 17456 

Colors : 
Black 

Brown 
Navy 

Taupe 

also 

Black with Henna Chenille Border. 
Black with Copenhagen Chenille Border 
Black with Cherry Chenille Border. 
Navy wdth Grey Chenille Border. 



We have never shown as big a range 

The very latest snappy designs 



FANCY VEILS 

VEILINGS 

"MONA LISA" VEILS 

"PEERLESS" "VODENE" 

REAL HUMAN HAIR NETS 

These goods are real money-makers ! 

RADIUM LACE 

Black, Brown, Navy 
For Dresses and Millinery 

"DYNAMO MALINE" 

All Shades 

METALLINE CLOTH 

Colors: Folly, Pheasant, Algonquin, Wedgewood, 
Jade, Peacock, Gold, Steel, Antique, Silver. 

FANCY VOILES and ORGANDIES 



A pleasure to show our goods 



Canada Veiling Co., Limited 

84-86 Wellington Street West : : Toronto 



in.; 



DR Y G DS R E V I E W 



^^^ TRAPS MARK ■^JSg^MP^^j^^^^^^^KlSTEREO ^^^ 

Petticoats Manufactured by Underwear 

JoJm P. lutcfjmsi Co. Etmiteb 

868 Collrgr Street, (Toronto 




The Peak of Perfection 

in 

Smart 

Lingerie— 

THAT'S what we started out to reach 
— that's what we have been striving 
for — and our products indicate that 
we have arrived! 

Wherever you see the PANSY MAID 
Trade Mark you are assured of all the 
desirable points that give distinctive 
character to smart lingerie. 

U n d erskirts — Pantalettes 

Jap Silks, Glove Silks, Satins, Taffe- 
tas — with wide range of fancy and 
plain flounce effects. Materials and 
workmanship the finest — styles the 
smartest. PANSY MAID Underskirts 
will bring a rapid increase in sales. 

Camisoles 

Bloomers 
Step-ins 

Envelopes 

Night Gowns 

Silks, Satins, Crepe de Chines, Japanese Jersey Silks — 
Lace, Ribbon and contrasting trimmings. 




"POLLY ANNA" 

ATHLETIC UNDERWEAR 



POLLY-ANNA 

UNDERWEAR 




We hold the Canadian rights for producing this widely-adve 
tised three-piece-in-one Athletic garment. The Polly Anna has 
several commendable features of merit that mark it apart from 
the ordinary type of Athletic garment. Added to these, the 
variety of dainty materials, and the nicety of finish, lend a 
snappy smartness that is quite marked. Fine Mulle, Jap Silks and 
Jersey Silks, Satins, Crepe de Chine — in white and pastel shades. 

A tailored garment with a delightfully dainty finish! 




H 



Q 



osiQry 



|ILK HOSIERY of the highest character 
— sheer, lustrous, fast'dyed, and 
beautifully boxed. 

Butterfly Silk Hosiery sets a very 
welcome new standard for value 
and long wear. It is moderately 
priced, and every piece passes seven 
inspections. 

In fifteen of the most desirable 
colors. 

Now made -in Canada by 

THE BUTTERFLY HOSIERY 
CO. LIMITED 



DROMMONt VILLE 



QUEBEC 



^ 






^ 



v 




A 

Triumph 

in 

Silk Hosiery 



BUTTERFLY 

(REGISTERED TRADE-MARK) 

A triumph in silk'knitting ! A triumph 
in perfect, fit in all siz,es from 8K up ! 
A triumph in really sheer hosiery that 
will stand the wear! A triumph in 
beautiful tones— fifteen, including four 
greys! And then a triumph in hand' 
some boxing! 

All available to you and your custom' 
ers at remarkably moderate prices ! 

Three grades Japan Silk, Art silk and 
a mixture of the two. 

TOUR JOBBER CAJi SUPPLY TOU 
Made in Canada by The Butterfly Hosiery Co. Limited - Drummondvillc, Quebec 



Sole Selling Agents: E. H. WALSH & Company LIMITED 

rOEOSTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 







■■ ,.':...' ,. 






Dnj Goods Rt vit u> 



!» K ESS A COESSO R I ES 



10'.) 



"JULIAN SALE" Lines Are the Last 
Word in Quality, Novelty and Value 

Keep in Close Touch with the House Through Our Travellers 
Our Catalogue or by Letter Phone or Wire 




SILK BAGS 

There'll be a big run on Silk Bags this 
season and we have anticipated it. 
Moire Silks will be highly favored 
in pleated effects as illustrated here 
and in the plain styles — a great line. 




SWAGGER BAGS 



SHOWING 
TO-DAY 

One of the largest and most 
varied lines of Leather 
Goods and Novelties that 
ever carried the name 
"Julian Sale" — unique 
in design and effect. 
Splendid in variety. 
Just such merchan- 
dise as will en- 
hance attractive- 
ness to any man's 
stock and with- 
al the most 
practical 
and useful. 



In illustrating the four spec- 
ially new things printed here, 
we are not underestimating 
the many, many lines of new 
beautiful goods in all other 
regular lines—the greatest we 
have ever sampled. 



LEATHER BAGS 

Never out of Season— al- 
ways in demand — The 
Swagger Bag is one of 
the newest and is shown 
in a great range of leath- 
ers and colors. Ostrich 
Grain is a feature of the 
line. 

BEAUTY CASES 

Not a more popular line or 
better seller in the sam- 
ples than the Beauty 
Cases — sell at sight — make 
an effective display in 
your "Silent Salesman" — 
get the assortment. 




SUEDE BAGS 

This will be a very popu- 
lar bag this season. Our 
line is big enough to give 
you excellent assortment 
and you'll not need to 
overstock to get variety. 




BEAUTY CASES 



The Julian Sale Leather Goods Company, Limited 

Wholesale — Factory — Sample Rooms and Offices: 600 King Street West, Toronto 



110 



Dry Goods Review 



Gloves and Collars Reveal the Mode 

The Easter Parade Will Call For Grey, Tan or White Silk Gloves in 16-Button Lengtb- 
The Mousquetaire and the Strapped-in Wrist Will Also Lead — Neckwear Will 
Employ the I'se of Real Lace, Organdie and Colors Will Have 
Their Place in Novel tv Lines. 




A Lace Fan. 



Beribboned Gloves 



A Bead Corsage. 



ORDERS for silk gloves are being 
placed somewhat more freely, 
particularly on the lengths suit- 
able for half-length and three-quarter 
length sleeves. Business is still very 
conservative in the better class kid glove 
lines, but even so manufacturers are 
having difficulty furnishing the fashion- 
able numbers in grey and tan glace 
mousquetaires. 

The demand for the chamois-suede 
. effects is excellent this Spring, and these 
lines with the various silk novelties are 
expected to sell freely. The fact is that 
the managers of the various glove de- 
partments are looking for further price 
reductions, and until they know what is 
to take place in this connection they are 
Koing most warily into the market, and 
buying only what they know will sell 
to the popular trade without difficulty. 

Twelve and sixteen-button length 
gloves in silk are being shown for wear 
with many of the smart Spring cos- 
tumes. The early approach of Easter 
this year will have a most stimulating 
effect upon the glove trade, the displays 
should therefore be changed frequently 
and arranged so as to keep interest at 
a high level. 

Neutral Tints and White 

The color movement for Spring is de- 
cidedly in favor of the "dust and ashes" 
shades, soft unobtrusive grey and tan 
tints and the ever modish pure white 
model. All shades are represented in 
the sixteen-button length, the mousque- 
taire and the shorter strapped wrist 
gloves, all of which have their place 
rding to the progress of the season. 
As Summer approaches it is predicted 



that the all-white glove will enjoy a 
tremendous and almost exclusive vogue. 
In the meantime all the soft neutral 
tints will be entitled to a place in the 
fashion scheme. 

In the sketch above the strapped-in 
wrist effect is achieved in a pair of fine 
white silk gloves laced with black moire. 
Such effects are very smart when worn 
with frocks in which gossamer fabric 
is used for the sleeves. 

Neckwear Newnesses 

Broderie Anglaise, Point Venise, real 
filet, organdie and net are the prime 
favorites when it comes to the choice 
of milady's Easter neck fixings. Tuxedo 
collars, dainty modestie vestees, "gilets" 
and cascade jabot effects posed on finely 
made guimps are among the smartest 
novelties, and unusual necklines are the 
order of the day when it comes to nov- 
elty effects. Of course the simple 
"Quaker" round neck line, the smart 
"V," the clear-cut delta and the swag- 
ger Tuxedo are the accepted lines for 
every-day costume requirements, and in 
all these outlines may be found the 
smartest confections in laces, nets and 
organdies. All white and all cream ef- 
'< ' i j, as stated last month, will be seen 
in the main, while unusual color effects 
will, of course, continue in the exclusive 
lines which are always featured by the 
smart specialty shops and in such stores 
as Stitt's, of Toronto, where the lower 
window is at present a dream made up 
of delicious conceits fashioned from pale- 
tinted organdies and soft-hued ribbons, 
with delicately perfumed accessories to 
enhance the effect. Beautiful real laces 
in guinure, Anglaise and filet are very 



effective in the new neckwear models, 
and considering the quality and perfec- 
tion of design are remarkably reason- 
able. 

The Gay Boutonnaire 

Matters of Easter importance in the 
accessory department cannot be referred 
to without a word or two about the ex- 
quisite corsages designed to add that 
touch of finality to the toilette of the 
well-groomed woman. These beautiful 
little posies are fashioned of silks, tis- 
sues, organdie and even of beads. In 
New York the craze for the moment 
centres on the latter two and prices 
range for these realistic floral bouquets 
from 75 cents to $15. The workmanship 
is excellent and the leaves are remark- 
ably natural, even the stems being fash- 
ioned to resemble the living blosspm as 
nearly as possible. 

Fans for the ensuing season will fol- 
low the French fashions and tarn for 
the most part to the gossamer conceit 1 
of painted chiffon, spangled net and 
metallically threaded lace. Medium and 
small sizes will be chosen in place of 
large models — a decided contrast from 
the sweeping feather beauties of yester- 
year. 



DOUBLE FLOOR SPACE 

The Ritz Fashion Shops, Jackson 
Building, Bank Street, Ottawa, have 
quickly come to the front as first-class 
retailers of the most exclusive clothes 
for women at reasonable prices. ' Owing 
to the success secured after only a few 
weeks' effort, the management already 
finds it necessary to double the floor 
space. 



Dry Goods Review 



111 



Dress Nets, Laces and Veilings 

Dotted Nets Worn Over Metal Tissue Cloths Are Decidedly Smart— Radium Laces Arrive 
"_New Veilings Striking in Design— Chenille Dots Strong in Colors— February 

Sales Ahead of Last Year. 



FANCY spotted silk dress nets, 36 
ia. in width, are very popular at 
present. In most cases the spot 
is about the size of the usual coin spot, 
and some numbers show small fancy 
motifs within the spot itself. These 
nets are being shown in shades of blue, 
navy, nigger, silver grey, turquoise, 
gold, white, peach, sky or cerise. One 
of these lines in black is shown in the 
accompanying illustration. Very dis- 
tinctive they are when worn over light 
shades, or the gold and kindred tissue 
cloths being used so extensively. 

Hand-in-hand with the popularity of 
the silk dress nets goes that of these 
tissue cloths, or more properly called 
"metalline cloths," which are so often 
the accompaniment of the former. These 
metalline cloths display the newest in 
the Spring's shades to better advantage 
perhaps than any other fabric on the 
market. The metallic foundation of the 
material supplies a setting for these 
beautiful colorings that reveals them in 
all their glory, with changing lights that 
really make it impossible to relate them 
to any one of the staple shades from 
which new colors are derived. Folly, 
Algonquin and Pheasant are among the 
smart new shades in metalline cloth, 
as well as the better known peacock, 
jade and Wedgwood shades. Besides 
forming foundations or trimmings for 
smart frocks, this cloth is beinsc used 
extensively for millinery, with delight- 
fully striking results. 

Malines are very strong at present — 
indicated by extensive orders being re- 
ceived. In most cases these are used 
for millinery. 

Radium Laces in Demand 

Large stocks of radium laces are be- 
ing received by Canadian importers. 
One Toronto importer reports that be- 
fore these goods had arrived quite a 
marked demand had arisen for them. 
With the goods now on hand, no doubt 
this popularity will greatly increase. 
These laces receive their name from 
their obvious metallic sheen. Flounc- 
ings in many beautiful patterns, one of 
which is illustrated in black, are being 
shown in 5 in., 6 in., 18 in. and 27 in. 
widths, and a wide variety of rich all- 
over patterns in 36 in. widths. The colors 
for the most part are confined to staples 
such as black, navy, and brown. They 
will be used for over-draperies on cos- 
tumes, or for whole costumes, and for 
millinery. 

Veilings 

In veilings indications point to a 
greater popularity for the separate 
fancy veil than for veiling by the 
yard. Perhaps the stunning effects 




A black radium lace flouncing showing 
one of the beautiful patterns on display for 
Spring. 

Inset, a black fancy spotted silk dress 
net. — Shown by Canada Veiling Co., Ltd. 

found in the new fancy veils for Spring 
are largely accountable, for certain it 
is that the new veils are very striking. 
Many of the veils are cut square, while 
others follow the longer cut as in the 
yard goods, but so far no particular 
preference has developed in either case. 
There is a very outstanding tendency, 
in the very newest numbers being re- 
ceived, towards chenille dots for borders. 



for corner motifs and smaller patterns. 
Black veils show chenille spots of Copen- 
hagen, henna or cherry shades. Navy 
veils show grey spots. Then, again, 
veils and spots of the same shade come 
in black, brown, navy and taupe. 

All-over patterns, spotted designs, and 
Shetland finished veils are enjoying 
strong selling in each case. 

Deliveries in veilings are now much 
improved, especially from France. In 
England goods are none too plentiful 
and prices are very little lower. As 
production has not yet reached its peak, 
one Toronto importer prophesies a mark- 
ed scarcity of goods in these lines when 
Spring arrives. 

Laces and Organdies 

Val. laces are decidedly the leaders in 
popularity at present, but orders are 
coming in very freely for all lines of 
laces for Spring. 

Among the new arrivals are fancy 
Swiss transparent organdies in all the 
leading shades. The designs come in 
colored checks of different sizes and ef- 
fects on white grounds, 45 in. wide. The 
outstanding feature of this material lies 
in the fact that it requires no starch 
in laundering, and after washing retains 
its original fresh crispness. This will 
no doubt be a strong favorite for sum- 
mer dresses, and is already being made 
into sport hats as well. 

In all the above lines reports indicate 
a very strong selling season ahead. 
Compared with last year, sales this 
February are far in advance. 



The Cretonne 

Fudge Apron 



Both ready-to-wear and drapery sec- 
tions in leading Montreal stores report 
an exceptional demand for the new cre- 
tonne fudge apron, which has just re- 
cently been introduced. Shown on wax 
figures, developed in a gay rose pat- 
terned design, in a combination of colors, 
and made in full skirted, pocketed style 
with large bib-like front, the new apron 
attracts numberless purchasers. An 
enormous butterfly bow of the cretonne 
ties in the back, and when the apron is 
slipped over an ordinary dress the effect 
is that of a charming summer gown. The 
idea is proving an excellent sales-stimu- 
lant for cretonnes as well as for the 
ready-made article. 



112 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dn/ Goods Review 



Dainty Colored Novelties 

In New York Windows 

Early Whitewear Sales Characterized by Offerings in Grey and 
Lavender — Trousseaux Will Feature Yellow. 



IN connection with the recent January 
Sales of White in New York stores. 
the window displays were particu- 
larly conspicuous for their use of col- 
ored novelties. As one woman remarked, 
standing in front of one of the most 
noticeable displays, "The underwear de- 
partments seem to be trying to inject 
some life into the annual White Sale by 
introducing new colors." 

Attracting perhaps the greatest atten- 
tion of any of the displays was that of 
Franklin Simon & Co., introducing as a 
new mode in feminine underthings pearl 
grey with ribbon trimming in an orchid 
shade. Two general types of sets were 
shown, the most novel being one whose 
sole trimming was a sort of interlacing 
latice-work of the same material, caught 
together with stitches in orchid colored 
thread. 

Grey and orchid underthings were also 
displayed in a window in Altman's 
during the following week, and, with 
the vogue for grey outer garments which 
is predicted for Spring it may be that 
there may be a limited demand for gar- 
ments of these shades. 

Paris Favors Orchid 

Orchid has been emphasized for some 
time in the Paris despatches as the com- 
ing color for lingerie, but there has 
been no noticeably large demand for this 
shade in this country, other than for 
display purposes. 

New York Likes Yellow 

A professional shopper arid chaperon 
reports that many of the trousseaux now 
being ordered by Easter brides call for 
lingerie and negligees in yellow. Par- 
ticular mention is made of orders for 
glove silk garments in this shade, rib- 
boned in black velvet. Light blue is an- 
other color reported popular for trous- 
seaux, many of which are being ordered 
now in order to allow time enough for 
the embroidering of monograms. 

Of window displays noted during the 
January sales, it was noted that the ma- 
jority were wholly or in part at least 
composed of French imports. Domestic 
silk garments were shown in a few win- 
dows, but domestic muslins were con- 
spicuous by their absence. 

It is difficult to effect an accurate 
comparison of this year's prices and 
those of a year ago, as from the quality 
point of view any such comparison is in 
reality unjust. Loosely speaking, how- 
ever, it would appear that sales values 
this year are probably between 20 and 
30 per cent, lower than those of last 
January, and in some few instances, 



more. Such a comparison indicates, in 
a general way, the trend of prices. 

It was noticed, however, that while 
some garments in crepen de Chine were 
offered at lower prices than have been 
obtainable for some time, many of these 
were of poor quality, skimpy and poorly 
made. From the standpoint of quality, 
many of the medium priced garments 
were better "bargains" than the less ex- 
pensive ones. With silk undergarments 
in the retail stores, a dollar or two in 
prices makes a marked difference in 
quality. 

Domestic muslin stocks at the majority 
of the stores consisted largely of the 
cotton crepes, plain or printed, and pink 
batistes. In a number of stores, the do- 
mestic garments were much shop-worn, 
soiled and mussed. The rest of the 
stock looked fresh and new. 



Accessories 

To Adorn 

A Cinderella 

INTERESTING dress accessories are 
being made this season of ostrich 
feathers, curled or uncurled, and in 
any color preferred. All of these dainty 
conceits are for evening wear, and are 
being shown in anticipation of a pro- 
longed post-Lenten season following af- 
ter Easter. 

A wristlet of long, slightly curled os- 
trich flues, caught to the upper arm and 
to the wrist by narrow black velvet 
ribbon, was one fetching bit of feminine 
attire. An arm decoration of ostrich 
fringe attached to black ribbon was sup- 
posed to be worn above the elbow mid- 
way to the shoulder, like a bangle. 
Party bags were also developed in ostrich 
fringe, one layer overlapping another, 
and dangling from long satin ribbon 
streamers. More elaborate wristlets 
and armbands of ostrich in double puff 
effect were also shown, finished with a 
dangling tassel of ribbon tipped with 
the ostrich. These are said to be quite 
fascinating when worn on the sleeve- 
less types of evening gowns. Another 
bag was made of fabric in triple effect, 
composed of a large centre section, and 
two smaller outside purses for cards, 
change, etc. The large section will con- 
veniently hold fancy work or knitting, 
and would be a delightful gift at any 
time. 

Bags 

Bead bags seem to be holding their 
own, too, and both large and small sizes 
are still featured. Among the newer 



styles noticed was a bag made of over- 
lapping strips of heavy faille ribbon 
embroidered in beads, and another made 
of a fabric fashioned by knitting or 
crocheting soft ribbons in various colors, 
or silk rags cut into very narrow strips, 
very much as the old-fashioned rag rug 
was made. This style was lined with 
plain silk and mounted on pretty ivory 
frames. 

Accessories, whether the gown they 
accompany is for daytime or evening, 
literally make or break the costume, 
and should be advised with due respect 
to the occasion on which they are to be 
employed. However, their cost is usually 
so prohibitive that they are only within 
the reach of wealthier women. 

The present fad in New York at pres- 
ent is the vogue for accessories inspired 
by the ornaments of South Sea Island 
maidens, and it is said that the bushy 
bobbed hair, the scarlet lips, the bead 
girdles, the pearl-wound arms, the flower 
wreathed heads and waists, and the 
fruits and berries which are so promi- 
ment a feature of the prevailing fash- 
ions, owe their origin to the primitive 
and exotic savagery of the tropics. 

Ropes of Beads 

New York has forsaken beaded em- 
broidery as an embellishment upon its 
evening gowns, and twines itself in long 
strings of beads of all descriptions. The 
wonderful shops of Fifth Avenue are 
literally ablaze with all sorts and de- 
scriptions of coral and seed pearls, jade, 
blue glass, pink stones and amber, onyx, 
ivory, chrysolite, gold and silver, ame- 
thyst, carved wood, jet and crystal. The 
bead girdles already spoken of, are 
largely used to define the waistline of 
the straight, unfitted frocks, which New 
York debutantes are wearing just now. 
The beads are as large as peas and are 
usually strung together with silver links. 
There is also a decided taste for wind- 
ing strings of pearls around the head, 
fillet fashion, and to twist ropes of tiny 
pearls round and round the arms from 
shoulder to wrist. All kinds of bizarre 
coiffure ornaments are favored by New 
York as well, including bandeaux of 
fur, filigree silver and wreaths of gold 
laurel leaves. Paris also sponsors hair 
ornaments of foliage, covered with 
diamond dust, which glitters dazzlingly 
under artificial light. A simpler, but 
quite effective hair bandeau is a nar- 
row scarf of vividly colored tulle wound 
about the hair and allowed to hang down 
at one side almost as low as the knees. 
A soft shade of raspberry is delightfully- 
artistic and provides an original note 
to the all black evening gown. 

Fans are more in vogue than ever, 
but in the most exotic varieties, such 
as vulture and peacock, pheasant or 
turkey feathers, or of delicate black or 
metallic Spanish lace mounted on amber 
or tortoise shell sticks. Colored ostrich 
fans are now on the wane and the places 
which formerly knew them, know them 
no more. 



Dry Goods Review DRESS ACCESSORIES 113 

■ 
1 

ARRYS 




Handle 
Nothing but Ribbons 



—CONCENTRATE ON RIBBONS 



Dame Fashion says Ribbons will be partic- 
ularly fashionable this Spring. 

Millinery will call for Ribbons of all widths 
and different kinds. 

Sashes and Girdles will be most prom- 
inent on most of the nice dresses. 

We expect nice Ribbons will be very scarce 
when the season really opens up. 

See for yourself what any good Fashion Book 
has to show. 

Our prices are all based on to-day's quota- 
tions. 



Walter H. Barry & Company 

The "Ribbon House" of Canada 
6 St. Helen Street -- MONTREAL, QUE. 

WINNIPEG BRANCH: CANADA BLDG. 



114 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 




MADE IN CANADA 



BUY DIRECT FROM THE 
MANUFACTURER 



STRAP BACK PURSES 
£7.50 to $54.00 D02. 



TOP HANDLE PURSES 
£12.00 to $84.00 Doz. 




NEW STYLE LUCILLE COLORED LEATHER 



LUCILLE BAGS 
$24.00 to $66.00 Doz. 



BEAUTY BOXES 
$33.00 to $63.00 Doz. 




METALLIC EMBOSSED TRIM ON STRAP BACK 



SILK BAGS 
$24.00 to $60.00 Doz. 





LADIES' BELTS 

tfi.qo to $12. • Doz. 



CHILD'S BAGS 
$4.00 to $12.00 Doz. 



BILL FOLDS 



LETTER CASES 



MUSIC ROLLS 



COLLAR BOXES 



NEW DESIGN MOROCCO ENVELOPE VANITY 
MANUFACTURED BY 

CANADIAN LEATHER PRODUCTS 

LIMITED 

144 FRONT STREET WEST TORONTO 



Diif Goods Reviev) 



DUKSS A C C E S S R I E S 



115 




la hi 



it 



Invariably, smartly gowned women 

wear veils. 

[t' s a cultivated habil because they 
know the veil is the finishing touch 
to any costume — they realize its en- 
hancing qualities. Such women 
select their veils with infinite care. 

All women like to be considered 
smartly dressed but many of them 
wear an occasional veil merely to be 
stylish. 

These women should be taught the 
importance of veils — they should 
learn to cultivate the veil-wearing 

habit ! •• 

Consider how much increased veil- 
ing business is yours if all your 
women customers learn this habit! 

A re you willing to assist in promot- 
ing the veil- wearing habit? 

Let u- help you. 



VAN RAALTE COMPANY, 

16th St. at Fifth Ave., New York City 

12 West St., Boston 
105 S. Dearborn St., Chicago 



Makers of VAN RAALTE Silk Gloves 
Silk Underwear, Silk Hosiery i 
and Nets 



116 



D1J ESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 




Follow Up the Good Things! 

TRIDENT HOSIERY 

is that good thing to show your customers who appreciate in 

DENT'S GLOVES 

the honest value, perfect fit and reliability, which qualities have characterized 
our lines for the two hundred years they have been leaders in the Glove Market, 
and the backbone of Glove Departments. 

You, Mr. Retailer, who know the value of a steady patronage of satisfied cus- 
tomers, stock for your Easter trade-pulling, Dent's Gloves and Trident Hosiery, 
which are backed by Dent's reputation for producing merchandise of Quality — 
Style — and Finish. 

Our representative will call upon you very soon. Place with him your Glove 
and Hosiery order. Goods will be charged to you at current prices ruling at 
time of shipment. 

DENT, 'ALLCROFT & CO. (CANADA) 

LIMITED 
Wilder Building, Bleury Street, MONTREAL 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



11 



™ — y>: 



=»« 



:ac 




8 

I 

I 

I 

OOC3E30: 



Artificial Flowers 

For Millinery, Coiffure, Corsage or Buttonaire 

Feather Fans 
Feather Trimmings 
Marabou Capes 

These lines are the sort of merchandise that 
brighten up your stock. They have an irresistible 
appeal to every woman for their possibilities — to 
transform an otherwise plain costume — to supply 
the necessary touch of individuality — and so on. 

The newest in all these lines will always be 
found at our Showrooms, for all Seasons. Our 
Spring display includes many fascinating novel- 
ties as well as a wide display of the more staple 
lines. Our stock is complete, assuring you prompt 
delivery. Be sure to call on us — right in the 
centre of the Dry Goods District. 

Dominion Ostrich Feather Co. 

LIMITED 
7frWellington St. West, TORONTO 

Representatives: H. B. Taylor. Mappin Bldg.. Montreal. J. G. Martin. Hammond 
Bldg., Winnipeg. Geo. Strachan. Welton Block, Vancouver 



- «-—.— i n { 




extern Heatfjer #ooosf Co., JXh! 



255-257 Richmond St. W. 



Toronto 



The Newest in Bags 
for Spring 

Beauty Bags, Canteen Cases, Vanity 
Bags, Silk Bags and Avenue Purses 
— in great variety of new Fancy 
Leathers and Smartest Spring Styles. 




We also manufacture a wide range 
of Staples in Ladies' Hand Bags, and 
Belts, Men's Pocket Books, etc. 

The fine quality of Leather ensures 
permanency of their good looks. 

Finest workmanship — inside and 
outside. 

We invite your comparison. 



An inspection of our line, either in our Toronto Show Rooms or our Travellers' Sample Rooms, 
will be of great interest to Dealers in Fancy Leather Goods. 




118 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 




We direct youi particular attention to — 

Men'* Unlined Domestic Cape Gloves, from $13.50 doz. 

Men's Unlined Domestic Mocha Gloves, from • • 12.00 doz. 

Ladies' Gloves, from 13.50 doz. 

Men's Work Sh irts, from S - 0G doz - 

Men's Fine Shirts, from 1W.50 doz. 



Dry Goods Review 



DRLSS ACCESSORIES 



119 




Exquisite Fabrics 

for 

Spring and Summer Frocks 

— not forgetting all the dainty lines neces- 
sary for smart Lingerie, for Millinery, for • 
Linings and numerous other uses. 

Spring atmosphere and Spring styles! 
You will find them fairly radiating from 
our extensive showing. An inspection will 
be profitable. 

Visit us on your next trip to Toronto. 



Included in our range: 



Crepes de Chine 

Georgettes 

Chiffons 

Ninons 



Satins, Charmeuses 
Printed Silks 
Silk Shirtings 
Artificial Silks 



Look W 


pP 


g£L On 


for this P) m 


W* [Yellow 


Trade j&j 


mj Boards 


Mark 1 


***** «^k a[M iTlift° 

Les Successeurs de 


W Only 


ALBERT GODDE,BEDIN&CIE 


. PARIS 


TARARE 


LYONS 


LONDON 




NEW YORK 



EMPIRE BUILDING: 64 WELLINGTON STREET WEST 

Telephone: Adelaide 3062 

TORONTO 

E. Desnoux, Rep. 

Western Canada Agent: Edwin J. Kirkbright, 205 Bower Bldg. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



5 a. K > m 



Easter Goods For 
Immediate Delivery 

VEILS AND VEILINGS 

Late Novelties in self colors and two-tone effects 

LACES 

EMBROIDERIES 

HANDKERCHIEFS 

You will find our extensive array for 
the Easter Season abounding in mer- 
chandise that will appeal strongly to 
your buying sense of good value, and 
good style. 

EASTER BUYERS! 

You are cordially invited to visit our 
conveniently located Show Rooms. 
If you cannot come in person, your 
Mail Order will receive the same in- 
dividual consideration as a personal 
call. 

WESTLAKE BROTHERS 
LIMITED 

24 Wellington St. West 
TORONTO 




■a —1— xx 



jiiiiiiiiiiriiii-iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiriiMiiiMMiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiii 

Novelty Neckwear 

The last word ia 

Dove Orey 

Organdy Vestees 
Organdy Sets 

The number illustrated a hit. 

Other lines in our ran&e : 
1 Ochre Shade Nets 

in 

Vestees 
Sets 
1 Lace Tuxedos 

QUICK DELIVERIES 

Phoenix Novelry Company 

^ 1 1 1 I.I.I 1 1 1 1 1 II I lilillllHIHIII'lllllll.l.l 1 1 1 III II III I i I.I III 1 1 1 !.!.!.! Ill 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 l:i:iil!lllli:ill!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllll 




No. 3560 



154 Pearl Street 

TORONTO 



(Fi 



King Fancy Waist Company 

The new—the smart— the dainty—the dependable in 

SPRING WAISTS 

will be found in our wide range now being shown. We offer you exceptional 
values in all the Season's popular lines — values that shrewd buyers will appre- 
ciate from many standpoints. 

GEORGETTES CREPE DE CHINES SATINS 



HI KING ST. WEST 



L. & R. BROWN 



TORONTO 



"Just Suppose" 



you have one line of Buttons that so pleases a certain smartly dressed customer that she will 
immediately decide to confine all the trimming of her new costume to BUTTONS, using that 
particular style throughout. 

With her standing as a smart dresser, other women will copy her style as authentic — 
and MORE BUTTONS will be in demand from other sources. 

The moral is plain — keep an attractive, appealing stock on hand to suggest to your cus- 
tomers the trimming possibilities of BUTTONS. 

Smart new Spring numbers now being shown. Write us or see the Button Man. 

Ontario Button Company, Limited 

Kitchener, Ontario 



y IV i u u vy I'O -iv xj v x ±u »» 



ADVICE TO MILLINERY BUYERS 

It will prove profitable to pay our show rooms a visit when 
in this market. 

We are showing a novelty line of trimmed millinery ranging 
from three dollars and upwards. 

GREENBERG LIMITED, 227 Notre Dame W., Montreal 



Buy Your Trimmings From a Reliable Source 



Cords, Fringes, Girdles, Drop 
Ornaments, Tassels, Fancy 
Braids and Yard Trimmings, 




in Silk, Wool and Tinsel 
effects. Lamp-shade Fringes 
and Gimps. 



THE MOULTON MANUFACTURING CO., LIMITED 



4 INSPECTOR STREET 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO: J Rutherford. 23 Scott Street. 
ONTARIO and QUEBEC: A. W. Woodhouse. 



REPRESENT A T1VES: 
MARITIME PROVINCES: F. L. Wright. 
WINNIPEG: Cleat & Co., 708 Builders Exchange. 



MONTREAL: M. S. Adcock 
VANCOUVER: Cleat & Co.. Williams Block 



HIGHEST QUALITY 

MADE IN CANADA 

NO DUTY OR EXCHANGE 

EACH BAT UNROLLS 
TO COMFORT SIZE 

72 x 90 

ASK 

YOUR 

WHOLESALER 

FOR ^^" 

COMFORTER COTTON BATTING 

MADE BY 

DOMINION WADDING CO., LIMITED - MONTREAL, QUE. 




1-2-1 



Dry Goods Review 



Belts and Bags For Easter 

New Leather Models Larger in Size — Lucille, Kodak, Lantern Bag and Beauty Box All im 
the Running — Smart Leather Belts Designed to Match Purses Carried — Novel 

Effects Encouraged. 



THE outstanding feature of the 
newest "strap back"— or "finger" 
purses, and those of the "top 
handle" variety this Spring is the de- 
cided tendency to larger sizes. While 
there is an extensive showing of the 
sizes which have been in vogue all along, 
the larger sized numbers lay claim to 
the distinction of the smartest of the 
season in their class. Plain leathers in 
black, subdued and bright shades, are 
being shown in many new and novel 
numbers for Spring. One black morocco 
"strap back" purse noticed recently by 
Dry Goods Review boasted an embossed 
leather trimming in metallic effect which 
lent an unmistakable air of distinction 
and good taste. Perhaps the most in- 
teresting and outstanding designs of the 
season in this class of purse are those 
in two-tone color effects, such as com- 
binations of blue and grey, blue and old 
gold, brown and green, etc. One of 
these numbers noticed had a striking 
Chinese dragon design in embossed 
leather. Other designs include antique 
effects, Paisley patterns, and metallic 
effects. Linings in these purses run 
mostly to plain silk moire or Japanese 
patterns in silk. 

Lucille and Kodak Bags Strong Again 

The Lucille and the Kodak bags are 
having a large run in all centres. New 
effects and new touches mark the Spring 
numbers now being offered. One new 
style noticed by Dry Goods Review has 
an additional opening in the front, which 
is really another section opening down, 
with no end supports of any description, 
and fastening at the top with a dome 
fastener. A mirror almost the full size 
of the bag is contained in this section, 
and facing it, in a narrow frame of the 
leather, a memo, tablet. This frame 
could also serve for holding a photo- 
graph if the wearer wished to carry 
"anybody's" photo along at all times. 

Beauty Boxes Continue 

The popularity of the beauty box of 
last season is still quite pronounced. One 
Toronto manufacturer reports that mer- 
chants are placing splendid orders. The 
curves of the new numbers in this class 
for Spring are a little different in some 
cases. One noticed of Tokio leather was 
in half-moon shape, the leather being 
a green and brown two-tone effect, in 
fancy design as described in the "strap 
back" range. Top curves in some cases 
follow the arch of the rainbow, and in 
other cases curve upward as in the 
crescent, with corresponding outward 
and inward curving lines respectively at 
the sides. A very popular style of 
beauty box has all the appearances of a 



Popular belts for Spring, showing inter- 
laced, contrasting effects; also new num- 
bers in plain and fancy leathers, all in the 
new widths of the season. — Courtesy Cana- 
dian Leather Products, Toronto. 

miniature suit case. It is made in what 
is known as gazelle leather, a sort of 
diagonal cross-grain effect. Another 
new leather noticed is known as "Pluck- 



ed Ostrich" leather. This has a glossy 
spot in the grain here and there which 
gives the impression at first glance that 
these spots mark the "pluckings" of the 
feathers. The leather shows a dull, 
finely grained finish between these spots. 
A raised effect sometimes used for trim- 
ming at the edges shows the same glossy 
finish as the spots. 

New Silk Bags 

Silks bags are popular and in great 
demand. A particularly smart and novel 
line is being offered in the "Chinese Lan- 
tern" bag, with pannier handle. The 
bag hangs straight from the round 
handle in lantern effect, as its name in- 
dicates. Lined with silk moire, with 
small change purse of the same material 
attached with a chain to the frame, this 
article has a large mirror inset in the 
top, and is really the last word in smart 
silk bags. Tops come in bronze, gold, 
oxidized, and enamel effects, the latter 
in different color combinations. 

Next to the "Chinese Lantern" in im- 
portance of newness, comes its little sis- 
ter, the small pouch silk bag, which is 
really a smaller edition of the former. 
The same metal top is used, but with 
only six inches of pouch, gathered in at 
the base at the tassel, the straight lines 
of the "lantern" effect are lost. Those 
who do not require the larger bag will 
be delighted with this small, neat edition 
which serves the same purpose on a 
smaller scale. 



-'iiiiiiilimiiimiuiiiiimiiiini i mi urn win iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiimiiiMiiiiiiMinMiiiimiiummiuiiiiiiiiiuiimiHiiiiiiiiiumji 






Right: One of the new embossed "top 
handle" purses in blue and old gold effect. 
— Courtesy Canadian Leather Products. 

Left: The "Chinese Lantern" bag in black 
moire silk with pannier top. — Courtesy 
Canadian Leather Products. 



'..IIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIimillllllllll I'MIIINIIIIMI 



,11 tl , , i niiitiii 111 1 iirmtii nil i Mint n iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiNimiiuiiitiiiiiiffliimiiiininnMMHiiiniilis 



Dry Goods Review 



FANCY COODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



i -J.; 



Belts in Demand 

The Toronto manufacturer referred to 
above reports a very pronounced run for 
belts. The smart belts of this season 
are slightly wider than those of the 
shoe-string variety of last year. The 
favored widths are % in. and 1 in. 

Unique effects are being shown in 
patent leather belts laced with gold 
braid, or with silver braid, and again 
with red braid. White patent belts are 
laced with black braid in the same fash- 
ion, as shown in the accompanying illus- 
tration. 

There is a marked demand for white 
kid and white patent leather belts. 
Doubtless these will be used extensively 
en the Spring and Summer costumes, 
and Summer suits. One costume noticed 
in the window of a Toronto retail house 
which prides itself on its exclusive 
styles, showed a narrow white kid belt 
on a smart frock of navy taffeta. One 
white patent belt noticed in the Spring 
range of a manufacturer had a punched- 
out pattern, with just the ordinary small 
circle perforation in a single row along 
the centre of the belt. Half of the circle 
was made to stand out from the belt, 
the effect making a nice departure from 
the plain belt. 

Belts and Purses to Match 

Perhaps the most interesting feature 
of the season in Beltdom is the fact that 
smart belts are being made to match 
milady's purse, in the same leather, and 
the same finish identically. In other 
words, the smartest touch imaginable to 
the street costume will be a belt and 
purse to match'. One Canadian manu- 
facturer is showing quite an extensive 
range of these sets, and predicts a very 
strong popularity for them, from present 
indications. 



The Batik Negligee 



While in New York and certain other 
large cities the Batik negligee has be- 
come an indispensable article to the well- 
equipped negligee department, the sell- 
ing of these unusual garments seems to 
have met with disfavor in some parts of 
the country, largely because the sales 
force did not have an intelligent appre- 
ciation of their beauty and artistic value. 

A thorough knowledge of the making 
of these garments and an understanding 
of their workmanship is, or should be, 
a part of the sales clerk's equipment. 
The interested saleswoman can interest 
others. 

Batik negligees are made of all kinds 
of fabrics, although chiffons, meteors 
and velvets are the most favored. The 
making of this fabric, which consists of 
successive dyeing, blends the colors into 
each other; and this blending, which 
cannot be imitated, is one of the tre- 




A Novelty in Net 

Decidedly out of the ordinary are the 
quaint net table scarfs, cushion tops and 
table centres being shown exclusively in 
Toronto by Alexander Jamieson & Com- 
pany. Pretty cut-out cretonne designs are 
appliqued on black or royal blue nets. Vari- 
ous sizes are stocked. 



mendous advantages of Batik. The un- 
limited variety of design and colors 
makes it possible to give to each negli- 
gee a personality and individuality all 
its own. 

Lately it has become quite the vogue 
to have a Batik negligee designed in the 
spirit of period surroundings. The mo- 
tives of the design on the textile and 
the color of the same harmonizing with 
the general atmosphere completes the 
decorative scheme of the home. 

It is impossible to get the same touch 
of individuality by machine-made goods. 
Hand dyeing gives hues which reflect 
the individuality of the artist and the 
wearer. 

Batik negligees are no longer to be 
considered a novelty for display pur- 
poses only. 



How Cretonnes 
And Linens 

Are Printed 

Cretonne is the name given by the 
drapery trade to a printed cotton textile 
for furnishing purposes. The word is 
of comparatively modern usage, and is 
probably derived from the first maker's 
name, Creton. Machine-printed cretonne 
is usually 31 inches in width and de- 
livered to the trade in pieces of 100 
yards in length. There is, however, a 
variety of 50 inches in width, which is 
supplied in pieces 60 yards in length. 
The pattern is of more decorative im- 
portance compared with printed cotton 
for dress fabrics, although a descrip- 
tion of the manufacture of cretonne is 
almost identical in process to all 
printed textiles for any purpose. 

The machine process of printing is 
one of the greatest achievements of 
modern times, and the more laborious, 
but beautiful craft of printing by hand 
is of quite minor, importance in com- 
parison. The rotary machine now in 
use is an evolution of the flat plate 
printing press similar to the press still 
used for copperplate engravings, and 
extensively in use by the cotton printer 
at the latter end of the 18th century. 

Engraved copper rollers set up round 
a big central drum are carefully ad- 
justed to reproduce all the various 
colors in their exact position.- The 
cloth enters the machine at the top, 
descending over the great central drum, 
receiving the impression from each 
separate roller, and ascending again 
with the impression, facing the atten- 
dant printer. The cloth is next steamed 
in order to bring out the full tones of 
the color and fix them to the fibre of 
the cotton. Then after thoroughly wash- 
ing, the cloth is dried and folded, ready 
for the finisher. 

The cloths used in the making of the 
cretonne are of many and various quali- 
ties and textures, but all are of cotton. 
Jute and linen cloths are printed in the 
same machine, but are properly desig- 
nated as taffeta and printed linen re- 
spectively. Chintz is printed upon such 
a smooth quality of cloth as will take 
an even, glossy finish with advantage. 

Block printing is a process of im- 
pressing cloth with color or dye by 
repeated applications of a flat hand- 
carried block, on the face of which is 
carved in relief the parts to be printed. 
When the block is placed by the printer 
in its correct position on the cloth a 
few sharp raps from a heavy mallet 
serve to discharge all the color carried. 
This operation repeated some hundreds 
of times from a block of a convenient 
size to handle constitutes the whole 
process of hand printing. 



r_M 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry Goods Review 



Belies es Prospects 

Excellent For 19^1 

Head of Prominent Hosiery Mills De- 
clare- Canadian Goods Offer Many 
Advantages 

Mr. Mitchell, of the Circle-Bar Knit- 
ting Co., believes any merchant who has 
any enthusiasm can sell more goods this 
year than last year. Hosiery, in par- 
ticular, has made the descent from the 
peak to present prices very quickly. 
Some lines are now little more than half 
the price they were early in 1920. When 
merchants can offer customers reliable 
merchandise at substantial reductions no 
doubt they will find ready buyers. Mr. 
Mitchell points out that some lines of 
Canadian-made hosiery offer many ad- 
vantages such as ladies' stockings with 
elasticity at top, narrowed ankles, deep 
heels and a tapered toe. Men's and 
children's lines, also, offer many ad- 
vantages. 



THE EASTER BONNET 

Continued from page 71 

plant. The foliage accompanying all 
these exquisite accessories is usually 
touched with a silvery sheen resembling 
the bloom on unpicked fruit and is in- 
describably lovely. Under the soft 
lights which are reflected by looking- 
glasses, this showing of Spring millin- 
ery flowers is indeed a delight to the eye 
as well as an irresistible appeal to the 
pocket book, and should call forth many 
expressions of appreciation. 

The Bride 

Another departure lately inaugurated 
by this progressive firm is the featur- 
ing of the latest bridal accessories, espe- 
cially the tulle veil and its ever-present 
orange blossoms. The latter are made 
of the purest white wax and so closely 
resemble the natural flowers as to be 
practically indistinguishable from them. 
The blossoms are featured in several 
styles of wreaths, varying from narrow 
to fairly wide tiara effects and are wired 
to retain their shape about the head of 
the wearer. The bridal veil and such 
accessories should naturally be found in 
the up-to-date millinery salon and with 
the month of June in the offing, special 
displays of headwear for bridesmaids, 
travelling, etc., are likely to be featured 
from this month on. 

The showing at Goodwin's, Limited, is 
also particularly noteworthy and fea- 
tures a charming variety of gray mod- 
els as well as those of gayer tones. 
Many smart shapes of Canton crepe 
were noticed, which will be much in de- 
mand to accompany the Easter frock 
of this material, so definitely decreed 
by fashion. The hanging loops or ends 
of fabric or ribbon are prominent just 
now and are being rapidly adopted by 
smart women of Montreal. The favorite 



model for older women was the small, 
close-fitting toque or turban of dull-toned 
cellophane or woven novelty braid, re- 
lieved by a touch of bright foliage and 
lightly veiled with a lace or net. The 
liking for large squares of lace in bor- 
dered veil effect, yet without any cen- 
tre, is growing, and these odd lace 
frames about the face will be a feature 
of the Easter parade. All kinds of heav- 
ily embroidered flowing veils are shown 
on the models exhibited as well. 

The Spell of a Gray Hat 

Quite the loveliest of the Goodwin col- 
lection was a demure little hat of pearl 
gray Canton crepe, with an upturned 
brim scalloped at the edge and bound 
with narrow gray gros-grain ribbon. A 
light scarf of the crepe was caught from 
one side to the other and allowed to 
hang down over the right side. The 
crown was crossed by the ribbon which 
was also used to make motifs in star 
effect between the intersections. 

Another lovely new creation was of 
navy blue Batavia cloth with a small 
rolling brim, overlaid with Delft blue 
ribbon about 9 inches in width, arranged 
to hang in three loops over the edge. 
A wreath of Delft blue foliage encircled 
the soft crown. 

A stunning drooping picture hat was 
also noticed, half faced with tomato col- 
ored crepe and simply trimmed with 
bunches of small berries and long looped 
ends of narrow picot edged ribbon in 
black. 

At Montreal Wholesalers 

A chat with several of the leading- 
wholesale millinery houses revealed the 
fact that business is decidedly better 
than this time last year and prospects 
are for a record season. The element 
of speculation which has retarded the 
progress of many other industries is for- 
tunately impossible in the millinery 
trade, and the present season sees the 
makers starting afresh with new stocks 
bought at lower prices. No over produc- 
tion of millinery is feared as the de- 
mand on the wholesale houses far out- 
strips the supply, although workrooms 
are busy every minute of the week. 

Among the many exquisite models on 
view in the wholesale salons was one Rat 
of navy tulle arranged in several layers 
to form a soft crown. The brim was 
composed of six small curved wings, 




overlapping all round and posed against 
the tulle as though for flight. This 
model was decidedly the most original 
of the collection. A bridesmaid's hat in 
pervenche blue georgette was made in 
poke shape and had a tulle crown lib- 
erally encircled with quantities of nar- 
row rose and blue picot ribbons, which 
fell almost to the wearer's knees in 
graceful loops, caught midway by an 
adorable nosegay of French flowers. A 
feature of the hat was an inside ban- 
deau covered with the same tiny flowers 
and veiled by the sheerest blue tulle. 

A shell-pink georgette model on direc- 
toire lines was wreathed in blue forget- 
menots and caught with blue streamers 
in the same manner as the former. 

An all-ribbon hat of pheasant colored 
corded ribbon was caught with an arrow 
head of white ivory at one side. These 
all ribbon models are almost universally 
becoming on account of the unstiffened 
nature of the brim. 

Batavia cloth in combination with 
coral foliage is a very strong feature 
of the wholesale showings, as well as 
large tulle shapes in black in combina- 
tion with drooping clusters of cherries 
or berry effects. Grapes are smarter if 
possible than other fruits, and are repro- 
duced this season with their tendrils 
marvellously realistic in appearance. 
Another Montreal house is featuring 
long silk tassels in variegated color ef- 
fects, in round, square and oval designs. 
They are also using quantities of beads 
in all sizes, mostly wooden, painted in 
bright splashy colors. The beads are 
used in whole strings twisted about a 
hat or sewn on singly. 

According to most milliners inter- 
viewed, the coming Spring season may 
be described as a "safe" one, as the new 
designs are almost universally becoming 
and there is no featuring of styles which 
have become hackneyed by over-use in 
the past. A delightful freshness and 
novelty is apparent in every showing 
without a trace of repetition of ideas. 
One milliner explained that she had 
made it a rule never to show a line of 
hats in any one style more than two 
seasons. The third was always a failure 
as has been seen in the case of the too 
popular duvetyn craze. It stands to rea- 
son that women who want exclusive 
models will only wear a certain style 
one season, after which they must have 
something different. This point of view 
is worth the consideration of milliners 
before deciding upon stock for a coming 
season. 



TEXTILES QUIET 

The linen and yarn markets remain 
quiet, with some inquiry in the former 
and sorting-up activities only in the lat- 
ter, says an advice from Ireland. Busi- 
ness in cotton shows no improvement, 
and a like remark applies to grey cotton. 
Fancy goods lines are very slow, with 
no prospect of change until well into the 
new vear. 



Dry Goods Review 

WHERE DO PARCELS GO? 

Continued from page 51 

The plan followed by a Montreal store 
in its delivery department is of great 
value in this respect. A book of address 
labels is kept on hand in the delivery 
section ready for emergencies of this 
sort, and should any error be detected 
prior to the sending out of the parcel, 
either from a badly written or blurred 
address, or one which is not sufficient to 
direct the driver, a special clerk is on 
hand to open the parcel and examine the 
sales-slip. Should there be no slip 
wrapped up with the merchandise, this 
clerk then goes to the department and 
identifies the parcel from the triplicate 
slip with the clerk. The parcel is there- 
upon re-wrapped and labelled with an 
address slip from the book mentioned 
above. The head of the delivery section 
makes it his business to countersign this 
re-wrap label and retains the faulty one 
to refer back to the clerk who made the 
error. This expedient, it is said, has 
saved the store many unnecessary delays. 
Of course, when a mistake of this kind 
does occur, it does not make the customer 
feel any more relieved to make promises 
of investigation and then let matters 
drag on another week. The store which 
wins the most custom is the one which 
cheerfully accepts the responsibility for 
the error and makes prompt restitution 
of the straying parcel, if such can be 
possibly done. Otherwise, the customer 
will avoid making large purchases in the 
store in future, having lost confidence in 
its capability to deliver goods safely. 
Naturally the store will retain a set of 
records for reference, in the event of 
having to make an adjustment on the 
purchase later on. 

Checking Up Mistakes 

A simple method of dealing with the 
incorrectly, addressed parcel is to keep 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



1 25 




A Modish Baa 

This smart design from the Spring lines 
of Julian Sales, Ltd., aptly illustrates the 
vogue for buffed alligator grained leather 
models. The bags are handsomely fitted 
and are roomy and large inside. 



a record of such mishaps in a book de- 
voted to this purpose and also to supply 
complaint blanks to the entry clerk so 
that a duplicate file may be kept by the 
manager as a means of providing cus- 
tomers with information regarding the 
missing article. After a parcel has been 
returned to the store marked "wrong ad- 
dress," the entry clerk should endeavor 
to ascertain the correct one from the di- 
rectory or telephone book, and if neither 
of theie prove of any avail, then careful 




Merry Maid Frocks 



questioning of the sales clerk may reveal 
a clue. If the customer charged the pur- 
chase, the missing address may be traced 
correctly in the credit department. If 
the correct address is at last discovered 
and affixed to the parcel, it should be also 
entered in the record book for returned 
goods and the complaint blank filled out 
as described above for the use of the 
manager. But if the correct address 
fails to come to light, the slip only should 
be sent to the manager's office to await 
the complaint from the customer, and the 
parcel held in the delivery department 
pending claim from its owner. When 
the proper notification comes from the 
customer, the parcel should be sent out 
immediately. 



E. A. Stephens Is 

Elected President 

The Ottawa Retail Merchants' Asso- 
ciation held its annual election of of- 
ficers on February 9, which resulted in 
E. A. Stephens becoming the new presi- 
dent; R. McGiffin, first vice-president; 
J. A. Larocque, second vice-president; 
D. E. Johnson, treasurer, and E. G. Crab- 
tree, secretary. It was suggested that 
monthly dinners and an annual smoker 
would add to the interest taken in the 
association and the members falling in 
with this idea appointed Stewart Mc- 
Clenaghan, J. E. Serre and A. J. Ste- 
phens a committee to arrange for the 
first dinner. 

Jess Abelson brought forward a mo- 
tion to ask the Dominion executive to 
urge the raising of the transient trader's 
fee from $250 to $1,000 and those pres- 
ent agreed with this proposal. 




Trade 



BUTTONS 

Our travelers are now out with our f ul ' 
line at considerably reduced prices; it will 
pay you to wait before placing your orders 

A. WEYERSTALL & COMPANY 
Head Office: TORONTO 

"Canada's Exclusive Button House" 



These dainty white models for juvenile devotees are from the lines of H. P. 
Ritchie Company and reveal the trend in children's fashions. They are of fine 
voiles trimmed with filet lace, hemstitching and wash ribbons. 



Travellers Are Out Now With 
Complete Lines 

French Ivory 

Greeting Cards and Post Cards for all 
occasions 

Purses and Wallets 

Pennants, Cushions and Textile Novelties 

Supplies for Celebrations, Old Boys' Re- 
unions, etc. 

Souvenir Novelties (a tremendous variety) 

Christmas Stockings 

Conservo Lunch Sets, Splashers, Table 
Sets, Infants' Bibs and Sets 

The product of ficc factories we own or control 

PUGH SPECIALTY CO., Ltd. 

38 to 42 Clifford St., Toronto, Canada 



TAINU1 liUUl^. AU11UJN& AiND TU I S 



Dry {roods Kevieis 




Let This Big Factory Make Money For You 



THE De Long factory is making money 
for thousands of retail merchants — be- 
cause it greatly increases their stock turnover. 

Why not let it do this for you ? It can start 
putting profits into your pocket the day you 
start carrying the De Long line — De Long 
Snaps, De Long Hooks and Eyes, De Long 
Hook and Eye Tape, De Long Safety Pins, 
De Long Toilet Pins, and De Long Hair Pins 
— the notions women know. 

Advertising in the Ladies' Home Journal, 
Rutterick Quarterlies, Elite Styles, Needle- 
craft, etc., is constantly reminding women of 
De Long notions. 



In addition, great numbers of women who 
are already satisfied users of De Long pro- 
ducts couldn't be switched from them under 
any circumstances. 

Of these two great groups of buyers and 
prospective buyers there are bound to be 
enough right in your neighborhood to bring 
you considerable trade — if you put De Long 
products on display. 

Begin now. Order from your jobber or 
send direct. When ordering, ask for our 
latest price list, which describes and illus- 
trates everything we make. 



DeLong 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 



Hook 
&Eye 



Company 



ST. MARYS, ONTARIO 



Dry (*»ods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



127 





( vS 






EASTER 

NOVELTIES 

are becoming more popular 
each season. 

Our new line contains a great 
variety of attractive specialties 
for the confectionery and 
novelty trade. 

Cotton Chickens, 

Roosters and Rabbits 
Papier Mache Rabbits 
Candy Boxes 
Easter Eggs 
Fancy Baskets 
Artificial Flowers 

Write for illustrated circular. 

NERLICH & CO. 

146 FRONT ST. WEST 
TORONTO 





• 





XJ 1\ 1 KJ KJ \J U O XV Hi V i. £j VV 



i>r\i yooys neview 






potce roared out, hoarse, profane; --the Mate's 



oice: 'Thought you'd try it again, did you, 
you dashed beach-comber. I'll teach you, and when I find 
the dog that left that rope for you I'll give him a leaf out of 
the same book. You bloody waster! I'll teach you! I'll 



j '" 



This is an extract from Frank Packard's 
"Pawned," which commences in the Feb- 
ruary 15th issue of MACLEAN'S MAG- 
AZINE. 

At the period in the story that this is 
written the leading character is a 



beach-comber in the South Sea Islands. 

Three months later, John Bruce is 
stretched at full length on a luxurious 
divan in the most sumptuous apartment 
of the Bayne-Miloy, New York's newest 
and most pretentious hostelry. 



How had this wonderful metamorphosis been made ? It is a 
mystifying, enthralling, intriguing story, the secret of which 
you can only get by reading every instalment of Frank 
Packard's wonderful yarn. 

OTHER UNUSUAL FEATURES 



"Are We Ashamed of Our Snow? 

By Charles Christopher Jenkins. 



No!" 



This tells the story of the conquering of the 
snow-drift problems by the railways of 
Canada. 



"The Drama of Our Great Forests" 

By Arthur Heming. 

"Meeting of the Wild Men," filled to the brim 
and overflowing with forest-lore. 

"Solons of the 80's" 

By Col. Geo. H. Ham. 

Some episodes of the 80's and 90's when he 
and his confreres were recording Canada's 
political history. 



"Soldiers' Settlements Making Good" 

By Agnes C. Laut. 

The wonderful success which has met the 

work of the Soldiers' Settlement Board in the 

West. 

"The Cross in the Sky" 

By R. T. M. Scott. 

A psychic story; simply, forcefully told, and 
tinged with war atmosphere. 

"The Queer Toff in Number 13" 

By Leslie Gordon Barnard. 

A human story of a brilliant man who almost 

"pegged out" until a wonderful love drew him 

back. 

"The City of Peril" 

By Arthur Stringer. 

The concluding instalment of this melodra- 
matic serial by one of Canada's favorite 
authors. 



REVIEW OF REVIEWS 

A selection from all the most interesting and instructive periodicals garnered 
from all quarters of the globe — autobiographical, scientific, descriptive and liter- 
ary. The best from more than 100 magazines and newspapers— to save your time. 

Macleans 

1 1 "CANADA'S NATIONAL MAGAZINE " 



FEBRUARY 15th ISSUE 



For Sale on 
All News-stands 



20c 



HAMBLYand WILSON 



LIMITED 

11 Wellington St. W. 
TORONTO 



We are showing a very large range 

of 

Children's Stamped Dresses and 

Rompers in Pique, Repp, 

Chantung, Holland 

Sizes one to four years 



Stamped Pillow Cases, Linens, 
Gowns, Towels, Etc. 



Knitting Wools in All Colors 



Knitting Pins, Instruction Books 



Flossell Royal Artificial Silk 
All Colors 




The mark of an informed man 

In the clubs of any town, the Boards of Trade, or 
any gathering of business men — ask "Who reads The 
Financial Post ?" 

A majority read this commercial newspaper for the 
sane, unbiased and exact news of business conditions. 
You, too, want to be informed on everything that 
may have a bearing on your business — markets, build- 
ing programmes, tariff legislation, manufacturing 
statistics. 

Stop at your news stand or send us a card and we'll 
send you a copy of THE FINANCIAL POST, that you 
may judge for yourself. 

Or have it mailed to your home — $5.00 for 52 issues. 

The Financial Post 



143-153 University Avenue 



Toronto, Canada 




WM. E. WRIGHT SAYS 

"We buy our gray goods in the open market. We 
get just the quality and construction we want and 
we have it bleached, dyed and finished exactly the 
right way for making 



lS fold tape 



"Of course it costs, more to make tape this way. 
Because we start right in the first place we come 
out right in the end. 




W. F. WRIGHT F. W. WRIGHT H. L. WRIGHT 



Vice-Pres. 



Sec'y and Treas. 



Sales Mgr. 





J. T. WRIGHT 

Factory Sup't 



C. A. WRIGHT 
Ass't Factory Sup't 



"Each one of my five sons has his special part in 
keeping up the standard of quality in Wright's 
Tape and the standard of service in the company. 
I want our friends in the trade to know their 
faces as well as they know mine. 
"The home sewing season is approaching rapidly. 
See that your stocks of Wright's Bias Tape and 
Wright's E-Z Trim are in shape for the big 
demand of the year." 



Wm.E.Wright & Sons Co.,m» s . 



315-317 Church Street 



New York 



Stocks carried at ail our Agencies 

CHICAGO ST. LOUIS 

R. C. TAFT GEO. F. ANDERSONS SON 

223 W. Jackson Boulevard 613 North Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA 

JAMES F. McCARRIAR 

1011 Chestnut Street 



WRIGHT'S 

BIAS FOLD TAPE 

k It lurns itselj A 



In U.S. Pat. Off. 



130 



Dry Goods Review 



Utilize the Show Window Ceiling 

Don't Get the Idea That the Floor Space is All That Matters in Your Store — The Walls anc 
the Ceilings Can Make Money for You if You Don't Ignore Their Possibilities- 
Compel Passers-by to Stop and Look at Novel Stunts Which Start 

at the Ceiling. 




An Unusual Display 



Striking window display of small wares shown by the John Murphy Company, of Montreal. The central butterfly is orange 
with black spots and the two stars are of bright yellow. Skeins and balls of knitting wools in pretty colors lend a gay tone 
to the prosaic theme of buttons and tapes. 



IF a certain portion of the rental of 
a store is charged against the store's 
show windows, then a certain part 
of this portion must be charged against 
the various parts of the window — so 
much rental for the floors, so much rental 
for the window glasses themselves, so 
much for the walls, so much for the 
background and so much for the ceiling. 

Of course it would be a pretty hard 
proposition to figure out the exact per- 
centage of the entire rental for the win- 
dows which should be borne by these par- 
ticular parts of the windows, but cer- 
tainly if the charges were to be made 
according to amount of sales value which 
each part of the ordinary display window 
has, a very small fraction of the entire 
amount would be taken on to the ceilings. 

Show window ceilings, as a general 
thing, do little toward helping to sell 
the goods on display or to attract atten- 
tion to the displays. Ceilings are, with 
the average window, simply an inevitable 
part of the window and they are made 
as unobtrusive as possible and are al- 
most entirely ignored by the average 
display man in framing displays. Once 
in a while the display man will hang a 
cord from the ceiling with a placard of 
some sort at the end of the cord or once 
in a while some daring display man will 
it a frarment in this way, but any 



real use of the window ceilings by dis- 
play men is very hard to find. 

And yet, why not get the utmost pos- 
sible out of the ceilings?. They are al- 
ways there — they are a definite and fixed 
part of the window, so why not make 
them pay their part of the freight no 
matter how little that part may be ? Why 
not make them do something worth while 
every now and then in helping to sell the 
goods of which samples are placed on 
display? 

It surely wouldn't be such a very diffi- 
cult task to get more out of the ceilings 
and to give an added snap and interest 
to the windows by using this usually un- 
used part of the windows. 

Using Curtains 

For example, why couldn't the store 
place a number of window curtain rollers 
on the ceiling, one in front of another 
starting at the rear of the window, and 
why couldn't the store place curtains on 
these rollers and then letter various sales 
messages on these curtains? 

For instance, the curtain nearest the 
front of the window might bear this 
message: 

"Watch for announcements of special 
bargains. These announcements will be 
seen here in a few minutes. Watch this 
curtain go up." 

Then the curtain just to the rear of 



this might bear this sort of an announce- 
ment: 

"Special offerings of waists at one- 
third off for today only. Watch for an- 
nouncement of special bargain counter 
at> which these waists are offered for sale. 
This announcement will be made in a few 
minutes. Watch this curtain go up." 

The curtain just to the rear of this 
one might bear this message: 

"Watch for the sample showings of 
waists which are being sold for one- 
third off today only. These samples are 
displayed just behind this curtain. Watch 
this curtain go up." 

If all the curtains were pulled down 
by cords attached to them and leading 
through holes in the floor to the rear of 
the window and if the first curtain was 
raised and then the second one was 
raised a few minutes later and so on, the 
message would be gotten across to all 
those people who were looking in at the 
window. And after the final curtain had 
been raised the waists might be seen 
tastefully arranged on the background of 
the window. 

Such a stunt would give a decidedly 
novel appearance to the window and 
would in no way interfere with any regu- 
lar display which the store might care 
to make. 

Again the store might attach ribbons 



Drij Goods Revii w 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



131 



to hangers placed all over the ceiling of 
the window and might arrange things so 
that these rihbons would hang to within 
a couple of feet or so of the floor. These 
ribbons might be kept in motion by an 
electric motor strategically placed. If 
the ribbons were of a sufficient variety 
of color and if they were kept constantly 
in motion they would give a most unusual 
and striking appearance to the window. 
Then on the floor of the window the store 
might place a large number of bolts of 
ribbon and might announce a special sale 
on ribbons. Undoubtedly such a stunt 
would attract much attention from pass- 
ersby and would be widely commented 
i by them with the result that the 
store would secure a large amount of 
valuable word-of-mouth advertising. 

Suspend an Aeroplane 

Or, again, the store might rig a little 
runway on the ceiling and from this sus- 
pend an imitation airship or dirigible 
balloon. The store might so arrange 
matters that the airship or balloon would 
be about a fourth of the distance from 
the ceiling. Then the stunt might be 
inged so that the airship or balloon 
would pass from one side of the window- 
to the other. And the store might at- 
tach a card reading about like this to the 
craft: 

'•NOT HIGH PRICED BUT HIGH IN 
QUALITY! 

"That's the slogan of this store. 

"Our goods are sky high in quality but 
they are earthbound in the prices we ask 
for them. 

"Naturally uncfer these circumstances 
they are moving fast, as fast as an aero- 
plane scooting across the sky in front of 
a storm. So we urge you to come in at 
once and secure the things you want 
from our High Quality Sale which is 
now on. 

"Don't miss your trip on our High- 
Quality-But-Low-Price-Airship. 

"Come in NOW. We'll be glad to see 
you whether you purchase anything from 
us or not." 

Such a stunt would be quite sure to 
attract a lot of attention from shoppers 
and to impress upon them the merits 
and prices of the goods offered by the 
store. And if the store hooked up its 
other advertising and publicity with this 
stunt in an effective manner through the 
use of about the same sort of copy in 
the newspaper ads and other window 
cards, the result would probably be that 
a large majority of all the people in the 
city would know about the sale and talk 
about it. 

Clear from the Ceiling 

Another way in which the store might 
get greater sales value out of the ceiling 
in its show window would be as follows: 

At one of the far corners of the ceiling 
the store might attach a cord or thin 
rope. It might then attach the other 
end of the cord to one of the lower front 
corners of the window. This cord might 
be drawn taut. Then from a small hole 



in the ceiling at the top of the cord, small 
cards might be placed on the cord and al- 
lowed to drop down the cord to the lower 
end of the window where they would drop 
out of sight through a hole in the floor 
of the window. There cards might beai 
this inscription: 

"OUR PRICES ARE GOING DOWN!'' 
Then a large placard in the window 
might give further point to the stunt by 
an inscription reading about like this: 

"NEW LOW PRICE LEVELS HAVE 
BEEN REACHED. 

"Look at the goods on display in this 
window. See the low prices at which 
they are marked. Then come in at once 
and buy such articles as you want before 
the rush for these goods makes them 
disappear like one of the cards through 
the hole in the floor. Come in NOW!" 

These stunts would take more time 
and thought, perhaps, than ordinary dis- 
play stunts. But they would be found 
to be worth all the time and trouble in- 
volved because they would give such a 
novel air to the windows as to make 
many more people stop and look than 
would stop and look at the ordinary 
display. 

Try them and see! 



lend visiting England this Summer, to 
meet with their fellow dry goods mer- 
chants of Great Britain and the United 
States. They will receive information re- 
garding the trade and general European 
conditions in a manner which they could 
nut otherwise do." 



Dry Goods Men 
of the Dominion 
Asked Abroad 

Through the medium of the Retail 
Merchants' Association of Canada, the 
British Drapers' Chamber of Trade has 
extended an invitation to the dry goods 
men of the Dominion to attend a gather- 
ing of British and American drapers in 
London, England, this Spring. Follow- 
ing a general conference in the British 
capital there is to be a six weeks tour of 
points of considerable interest in Eng- 
land, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. Ar- 
rangements have been made for the Can- 
adian and American delegates to sail 
from New York on April 20, on the S.S. 
Olympic. Special reduced rates have 
been promised by the steamship com- 
pany and special rates are being ar- 
ranged for on the railways in England 
and the other countries to be visited. 

Those dry goods merchants who wish 
to take in the trip should notify the 
secretaries of the various provincial 
boards as early as possible. 

The tour of the British Isles will take 
in many of the historic places of interest, 
such as the textile industrial plants, and 
will give opportunities for conferences 
with dry goods men, manufacturers and 
merchants. 

The Canadian delegates will be fur- 
nished with credentials and letters of in- 
troduction from the association! 

Discussing this forthcoming event, Mi\ 
E. M. Trowern, secretary of the Retail 
Merchants' Association of Canada, said: 

"I consider this an excellent oppor- 
tunity for any of our members, who in- 



Newly Decorated 

Sample Rooms 

Kent-McCIain, Ltd., of Toronto, Carry 

Out Effective Scheme at Carlaw 

Avenue Factory 

Kent-McCIain, Ltd., of Toronto, have 
introduced a decidedly unusual effect in 
the decorative treatment of their sample 
rooms, which are located in the factory 
building on Carlaw Avenue. 

The floor is of light quarter-cut oak. 
The walls to a height of about nine feet 
are tinted to a neutral tone — a grey- 
brown color scheme. Above this an 
artistic plate rail encircles the room. 
The treatment of the remaining space, 
of about three feet, from the raiF to the 
ceiling, is unique. It is the result of 
the company's management seeking the 
co-operation of a prominent Toronto 
artist who carried out the work. Broad 
vistas of rolling prairie, dense forests, 
lakes and rivers are to be found on the 
different panels. All these varying 
scenes are effected by the use of only 
three colors — brown, blue and white — 
so there is nothing glaring or out of 
keeping in the decoration. 



To be Known as 

. Photo Krafts Studios 



Canadian Branch of Underwood and Un- 
derwood, of New York, Renamed — 
Under Same Management 

Photo Krafts Studios, Limited, is the 
name of a new company organized to 
take over the Canadian Brancb of Un- 
derwood and Underwood, commercial 
photographers, etc., New York city. 

The business will be conducted as 
heretofore, there being no change ex- 
cept in the name, the Canadian company 
being under the management of F. E. 
Ritchie and supervision of Miss J. M. 
Hinman, who has been in charge of the 
business for Underwood and Underwood 
in Montreal since its inception. It is 
intended, if possible, to give a still bet- 
ter service in all branches of the busi- 
ness, supplying art subjects to manufac- 
turers, retailers, etc., special attention 
being paid to the development of high- 
class illustrations of furs, ready-to- 
wear, etc. 



GIVE AWAY HOSE 

The Gainsboro Shoppe, 204 Sparks 
Street, Ottawa, during its "Thrift Sale" 
offered splendid bargains in ladie;' wear. 
One pair of hose for every two pairs 
purchased was a recent inducement. 



132 



Dry Goods Review 



Four Cardinal Points of Advertising 

Select Copy as You Select Your Clothes — Advertising Expresses Personality — Use of White 
S'\ice Attracts Favorable Attention — Always Have an Idea in Mind. 

• By ERIC W. GIBBERD 



NEWSPAPER advertisements ex- 
press personality — by their word- 
ing, type faces and general treat- 
ment. Perhaps quite as important as what 
you say is the way you say it — the sug- 
gestion your advertisement gives to the 
casual reader— the taste, as it were, that 
it leaves in the reader's mouth. Don't 
overlook for one moment the fact that 
there are hundreds of these casual read- 
ers. 

The functions of the advertisement 
can be divided into several distinct 
phases: — Its appearance must attract 
attention. — Its copy and "story" must 
get and maintain the reader's interest. 
— Its argument must create desire of 
ownership. — And either its price or 
timeliness must stimulate action. 

Headings — Complete Thoughts 

Concentrating much in a few words, 
crystallizing the message of your adver- 
tisement into a few well chosen, atten- 
tion-compelling words, is the secret of 
successful headings. You cannot come 
to the point too soon in the average 
advertisement. Cultivate directness. 
Avoid verbiage. 

Often has it been said that the copy 
should be selected as you would select 
your own clothes. Glance through any 
of the big metropolitan newspapers — 
page after page of advertising, all dif- 
ferent, from all sorts and types of busi- 
ness endeavors, each in its way expres- 
sing the character of the men behind 
the guns. This veritable exhibition of 
advertising ranges from the heavy, loud, 
black face advertisement of the bargain 
store to the light face, artistic announce- 
ments of the more exclusive establish- 
ments. 

Right here it might be well to remark 
that the leading authorities on adver- 
tising are relying more and more upon 
white space to attract favorable atten- 
tion to their message. It is most em- 
phatically to be preferred to the over use 
of heavy, black rules to give emphasis 
and to catch the moving eye. 

Have Idea in Mind 

Each merchant writing his own copy 
clearly pictures in his own mind the 
type of advertising he desires for his 
own particular business. It is a far more 
difficult matter to get these ideas to the 
printer and through him to your pros- 
pective customers, the buying public. 

The following hints may be useful in 
the preparation of an advertisement. 

After having decided upon the space 
you are using, rule off that exact size 






6) 



-? 




— from .Drowns 



J5<yys DfiAtT 




Jf-MPOWM-'' 




fkns O'CoaTs 




upon a large sheet of paper. (The local 
newspaper will gladly supply you with 
this.) Next block off the space you 
intend to give to the various lines of 
merchandise, pasting upon your layout 
or dummy, as the large sheet is called, 
pictures of the cuts you intend using. 
If you have no prints of the cuts, mark 
off their size and indicate their position 
by writing in the space "Men's O'Coat 
Cut" or whatever the case may be. Let- 



ter in your main heading and some of 
the principal display lines but do not 
attempt to write all copy matter upon 
the layout. This should be written upon 
small separate sheets and keyed to the 
layout by figures as shown in Fig. 1. 
Leaving a good margin on the left of 
these small copy sheets will greatly 
facilitate the setting of the type, the 
printer having to "mark up" his instruc- 
tions on each sheet. 



Dry Goods Revii w 

Where Does the Publisher Get Off? 

His Rights Are Seldom Respected in the Matter of Contracts- Expected to Reduce His 

Rates and Give Better Service at the Same Time- Time That the Space-buyer 

Plaved Fair With the Press — Mutual Benefits Will Follow. 



i.;.; 



LAST May there was a director's 
meeting called by one of the lead- 
ing farm paper publishers. The 
rd of business booked was submit- 
ted. It showed a splendid volume of 
advertising lined up for 1921, in fact, 
it was one hundred and two per cent. 

ter than ever before. 

The president addressed the meeting 
as follows: 

"Boys, now that they are coming our 
way, we should do the things that are 
necessary to put this paper so thor- 
oughly 'over the top,' that its suprem- 
acj can never be disputed. 

"Let us invest this splendid income in 
making improvements that will give the 
advertiser the best proposition there is 
for the money in our field. Let us make 
it sc good that there never can be any 
question about his coming back." 

Accordingly, plans were perfected for 
a 20 per cent, increase in circulation. 
When this circulation was assured it 
was decided a new press would be re- 
quired and it was ordered. To give 
the additional room and other proper 
facilities for good press work the floor 
space had to be greatly increased, hence 
the purchase of a building. 

It also seemed, not only advisable, 
but just the right thing, to make a con- 
tract for a better grade of paper, and 
the extra amount necessary for this 20 
per cent, increase added about $85,000 
to the paper bill. 

The next stop was to increase the 
editorial service by the employing of 
two college professors. These men were 
engaged under contract to fill a larger 
paper. 

Finally, a Research and Dealer Help 
Department was installed at a very con- 
siderable expense. 

These directors planned to do the 
things that are most wanted by the 
advertiser, the advertising agent, the 
representative and even the reader of 
the paper, and those plans were made 
as a result of business actually booked. 

All this in the month of May. Presto! 
Change! The tide turned. "From them 
that hath not shall be taken even that 
which they have." Instead of getting 
the expected and usual amount of fall 
orders, added to the surplus on hand, in 
comes a string of cancellations. 

Biff! Bang! Smash! Who cares for 
the publisher? "Truly we gave him a 
contract, but what of that? Cancel it 
— we don't think we can use the space 
to advantage." Not one in a hundred 
even grant the courtesy of an explana- 
tion. It is just a case of cold-blooded 
indifference to the publishers' rights or 



the value of an advertising agent's 
order. 

What can the publisher do? He is 
under contract for his extra circulation. 
He is under contract for his extra hous- 
ing facilities — his extra printing equip- 
ment and his extra paper. He cannot 
discharge his editorial force, neither 
can he discontinue his Research and 
Service Department. These improve- 
ments, made very largely in the interest 
of a better product for the advertiser, 
must be carried on. 

January first appears on the horizon. 
Mr. Manufacturer and Mr. Agent take 
stock of the 1921 prospects and then 
they jointly decide that Mr. Publisher 
must reduce his rates to a pre-war basis 
or get no business. Yes, the decree has 
gone forth from a very considerable 
number, and it goes forth without the 
slightest assurance of what the support 
would be were a reduction made. Simply 
a question of "We insist upon lower 
rates." 

There is no recognition of an improved 
service on the part of the publisher. 
There is no recognition of the fact that 
the farm paper publisher was the last of 
all commercial industries to raise prices, 
and then never raised them in propor- 
tion to the increase in cost of produc- 
tion. 

There is no recognition of the fact 
that the publisher cannot reduce his 
overhead as can be done in other lines 
of business. There is no recognition of 
the fact that the publisher is probably 
the most decided loser by this epidemic 
of "cancellitis." Still he must go on — 
his issue must come out — he is under 
contract to his readers to supply a spe- 
cific article, of a standard quality, and 
there can be no let-up, no matter what 
the advertising patronage may be. 

There is no consideration of the fact 
that for years and years the press of 
this country has struggled and strug- 
gled through all kinds of hardships, 
until it put the very foundation under 
commercial America. 

Let the space buyer play fair — be rea- 
sonable with the publisher. If you want 
to suck the blood out of business, starve 
the press. If you want to put out the 
fires under the boiler of your own indus- 
try, stop your advertising. If you want 
to cripple the express, the postal, the 
freight and the railroad service of the 
United States, stop your advertising. If 
you want to dull the intellect, cease to 
educate the buying population of the 
United States and spread pessimism, 
then withhold your patronage from the 
press. 



On the other hand, if you want to see 
the glorious sunshine of business pros- 
perity throughout the length and 
breadth of this land, jump to the front 
with the determination to do your part 
in its promotion. The surest way you 
can do that is by giving the publisher 
what is necessary in advertising patron- 
age, and at a profitable rate, thus en- 
abling him to put forth an optimistic, 
confidence-in-spring and trade-building 
enthusiasm that will compel business de- 
velopment. — Reprint from Printers' Ink, 
issue of January 27, 1921. 



Fees Based on 

Business Volume 



Secretary J. C. Campbell Suggests New 
Basis for Membership in R.M.A. 

The suggestion that the annual fees 
covering membership to the Retail Mer- 
chants' Association of Canada be gov- 
erned according to the volume of busi- 
ness done was contained in the report of 
the secretary, J. C. Campbell, of Ot- 
tawa, presented at the convention of the 
Eastern Ontario and Ottawa District 
held in Brockville in January. The sug- 
gestion is embodied in the following 
paragraphs taken from the secretary's 
report: 

"And now I come to a matter of great 
importance to the welfare and future of 
this Association. As most of you are 
aware, our membership fees have been 
increased. Up to November last we 
were operating on a minimum fee of 
ten dollars per year and on that we were 
barely able to scrape along, making no 
provision for emergencies or for the 
future. New demands from the Domin- 
ion Board call for an annual per capita 
payment of two dollars, while the On- 
tario Provincial Board takes one dollar 
per member from us. Under the former 
fee of ten dollars this would have been 
impossible, as we would have had but 
seven dollars per member from which 
to pay the expenses of our rapidly ex- 
panding business; consequently it has 
been found necessary to increase our 
minimum fee to twelve dollars, and even 
with this, after paying fees to the Do- 
minion and Provincial Boards, we will 
have but nine dollars per member for 
ourselves — certainly not enough in view 
of the work to be done. 

"In addition to raising the minimum 
fee, it is to my mind absolutely neces- 
sary, if we are to provide funds for the 
Continued on page 159 



L34 



i rPME N T AND DISPL A V 



Dry (load* Review 





A NEW WAY STORE 

Beautiful, efficient, serviceable, reducing expense, increasing 
sales, all accomplished by ffHE NEW WAY SYSTEM, 
patented in Canada, manufactured and sold only by 

JONES BROS. & CO., Limited 

29-31 Adelaide St. West - - TORONTO 

Full explanation by mail or by personal interview 




Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



135 



Anticipate Your Requirements, and Show Your Merchandise to 
Best Advantage by Using TAYLOR-MADE FIXTURES 

ELEGANT NEW FIXTURES 




FINISHED IN SATIN 

GOLD AND 

BLACK TRIM. 



No. 505 (Five Sizes) 
A perfect gown and waist stand for 
quality garments. Made in various 
heights to display gowns and dresses, 
waists, children's dresses, camisoles, 
etc. 

18 inch $2.50 

24 inch 2.75 

30 inch 3.00 

36 inch 3.50 

56 inch 4.75 






No. 522 (Three Sizes) 

Pedestals, for building up window 
displays, carrying waists displayed on 
forms, and for a multitude of other 
purposes. 

18 inch $4.00 

24 inch 4.50 

30 inch 5.00 



No. 69 — Good Form Waist and Dress 
Hanger. 

Because every hanger is perfectly 
smooth, ladies' wear buyers from coast to 
coast prefer the No. 69. It is steam bent, 
not sawed out. No rough edges to in- 
jure garments of delicate texture. 

No. 69 Per hundred $7.50 



No. 508 (Five Sizes) 

Artistic Millinery Stand. 

18 inch $2.25 

24 inch 2.50 

30 inch 2.75 

36 inch 3.25 

56 inch 4.50 



No. 280 — Combination Suit Hanger 

A coat form hanger, strong and well made. 
Lock joint head, waxed and buff finish. Swivel 
hook. 

Per hundred $11.00 



A Guarantee of Complete Satisfaction Accompanies All Taylor Made Products. 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 



MAIL YOUR ORDER NOW 



Taylor-Brasco Limited - Hamilton, Ontario 



L36 



K Q V I P M?NT AND DISPLAY 



Dry Goods Review 





u&mdL 



l 



Truck 






Not only does the Ford mean 
more goods handled per day — it 
provides dependable service at 
lowest initial investment and low- 
est maintenance cost. 

Repairs and genuine Ford parts 
everywhere at fixed prices. 

Sold as chassis only; 
Price $750 F.O.B. Ford, 
Ontario. Starter and elec- 
tric lighting $100 extra. 

Your dealer can advise you 
the best type of body to suit your 
needs. 

FORD MOTOR COMPANY 

OF CANADA LIMITED 

FORD .... ONTARIO 




Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



137 



r 




The history of the day's business 

Every time a sale is recorded on an up-to-date National 
Cash Register, a complete record of the sale is printed 
on a strip of paper inside of the register. 

This strip of paper is called the detail-strip. 

It shows how much business is done during certain hours, 
or during the merchant's absence. 

It cannot be removed or changed without the merchant's 
knowledge. 

It prevents the cash drawer being opened without a per- 
manent record being made. 

At the end of the day, the^ merchant takes the detail- 
strip out of the register and files it away. 

It gives him a permanent, unchangeable history of each 
day's business. 

The detail-strip is only one of the many features which 
make up-to-date National Cash Registers a business 
necessity. 



RB*-2.50 
SARc12.00 
RE* -0.75 
RA*-1.25 

SECh-7.45 
RD*-0.33 
RD*-4.25 



RAPd-0.50 
RD*-0.89 
RB*-0.15 
RE *-5.35 



SA Ch-4.50 
-DMS-0.00 
RB*-2.23 
SDCh-3.75 
RA*-4.08 
RE •-0.75 
RD*-1.00 
SECh-1;25 
RB*-5.75 
RD *-0.47 
RA*-1.25 



0001 

0002 
0003 
-0004 
-0005 
-0006 
►0007 



0008 
0009 
0010 
0011 



-0012 
-0013 
-0014 
-0015 
-0016 
-0017 
-0018 
-0019 
-0020 
-0021 
•0022 



This is a section of the 
detail-strip. For each 
transaction it shows (1) 
whether a receipt or slip 
was issued, (2) the initial 
of the clerk, (3) the kind 
of transaction, (4) the 
amount, and (5) the 
number. 

Let our representative 
•how you how it will help 
you make more money. 



We make cash re^istefrs for every line of business 

NATIONAL, 

CASH REGISTER CO. 

OF CANADA LIMITED 



138 



EQ l I r M E NT AND DISPLAY 



Dry (roods Renew 




EASTER 

DISPLAYS 



should be planned now, and 
the most attractive displays 
can be obtained by using 

DELFOSSE 
FORMS AND FIXTURES 

< >ur high-class wax figures will in- 
terest every ready-to-wear mer- 
chant. 

Besides our own exquisite models, 
we carry a most exclusive line of 
samples of Parisian Wax Manne- 
quins of Pierre Imans, Paris, for 
which we are the sole Canadian 
agents. 

See our New Line of artistic Wood Fixtures 
for all class of Trade. 

Delfosse & Company 

247-249 Craig St. W. ( Montreal 



mi 



THE WALKER BIN & STORE FIXTURE CO., LTD. 

KITCHENER, ONTARIO 




Sections for Dry Goods, Gloves, Hose, Skirts, etc. 

Walker Medium-priced Fixtures 

Show Cases, Counters, Tables, Shelving and 
Wall Gases to Order for All Purposes 

Send Floor Plan with measurements and your ideas— 
we will work out plan and quote you 



II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 in l n ll 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 ii ITU III 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ml 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 lil 1 1 1 1 l:l 1 1 1 1 II iii:iii;iiliiiiiiniiii 1 1 k 



Dry Good* L'eview 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



]:".i 




Can Any One Beat This Record ? 

1 A ^^ft Sales in a twenty-four hour day from floor space 57x44 feet are the figures, 
J-TTjOOO Kinsel's Drug Store, Detroit, is the store where they were made. 



Except for the cigar counter, all these sales were han- 
dled by Lamson Improved Service. Eight stations are 
serving about fifty sales clerks working in shifts, with 
a maximum of three cashiers required during the rush 
hours and on Saturdays to handle the money and sales 
slips. The service given is best described in Mr. E. C. 
Kinsel's own words — "The foundation of our success is 
good merchandise, prompt service and courteous treat- 
ment to our customers. Our clerks can give prompt 
service and courteous attention largely through the use 
of our Lamson Improved Cable Service. 
"The system is so quick that change is returned to the 
most distant station in an average of twenty-six sec- 
onds. As soon as the merchandise is slipped into an 
envelope or wrapped, the change is ready to return to 
the customer. 



"Another thing we like about Lamson Service is that 
clerks do not have to wait in line at a service point on 
a busy Saturday afternoon or when the store is crowd- 
ed with customers. Almost any number of clerks can 
use one station for as soon as one sale is dispatched 
the station is ready for the next sale. 

"For handling successfully large volumes of sales with 
the speed and courtesy we demand, Lamson Improved 
Service is the ideal method." 

The Kinsel Store uses Lamson Improved Cable Carriers. 
Any merchant, in any line of business, can get the same 
good service through Lamson Pneumatic Cable, or Wire 
Line Carriers. 



Average results in stores using Lamson Improved Service are 
40 second cash service, 50 second charge service 
Total cash receipts balance within a dollar 
Credit errors and adjustments cut in half 
Up to 40 r p less supervising and operating expense 

The Lamson Company 

lOO BOYLSTON. BOSTON, MASS. 



100 Boylston SI. 

.New York 9-n East 37tl) Si 

Philadelphia ■ ...210 North Broad Si 

Pittsburgh 319 Third Ave 

Baltimore Equitable Building 

R.Klie/.ier 194 East Main si 

Nev Orleans, 227 Bourborn si 



Branches and Service Stations 



Detroil 525 Woodward Ave. 

Cleveland 2063 East 4th St. 

Cincinnati 119 East 5th St. 

Indianapolis, Cor Washington and Illinois 
Los Angeles 221 San Fernando lildg. 

Additional Service Stations 



Chi ago 6 North Michigan Ave. 

Omaha 41S McCague Bklg. 

Minneapolis 320 Tribune Annex 

San Francisco 317 Mission St. 

St. Louis 709 Tine St. 



Alban: 



So. Pearl St. 



Buffalo. 191 Main St. 



Tc ito 136 Simcoe St. 

Vancouver. B.C 603 Hastings St. 

Dallas 905% Elm" St. 

Seattle 215 Stewart si 

Washington, D.C....426 Colorado Bldg. 
Atlanta 30 Moore Bldg. 

Kansas City. 210 New Ridge Bldg. 



— ■" — — ^— — — — — " ' ._._...... | | t — i n i ii ii i i ii mi 

Lamson iMraovfb service 



■ i - - — 



Flexibility Economy 

... 



' ■ »._i ' ' i — —— 



1-M 



E Q U I P M E NT AND DISPLAY 



*, 


J 


■ '■ 
1 


^^M 





.4 Society Queen of strikingly natural beauty and poise. 
This figure is mounted on full length body, beautifully 
finished in flesh enamel. 

YOUR 

Easter Displays 

will be many times enhanced by the 
use of artistic, appealing — 

DALE WAX FORMS 
and FIGURES 

They are an investment — an addition 
to your selling force — a very promi- 
nent touch of beauty and reality to 
your displays — a most important 
part of your store fixtures — all in 
one! 

There is a Dale Form or Fixture to 
display every kind of merchandise. 

Send for Catalogue. 
Call at our Showrooms when in 
Toronto. 

AGENTS : 
MONTREAL 

P. R. Munro 
259 Bleury St. 



\> 



WINNIPEG 

O'Brien, Allen & Company 
Phoenix Block 

VANCOUVER 

E. R. Bollart & Son 
501 Mercantile Bldg. 



No. 3001 

HAT 
STAND 



DALE WAX FIGURE CO. 

LIMITED 
86 York Street, Toronto 



Victor H. Canham Co. 

Guelph, Ont. 

for HANGERS for every use 

For Retail- For Stock Use — For Advertising 



Your Name and Address printed on each 

Hanger, if desired, in lots of 100 and over, 

FREE OF CHARGE. 




Canham 
Felt-Padded Hanger 

FOR SKIRTS OR TROUSERS 
6 inches wide 

Canham 
Star Skirt or Trouser No. i 

Hanger No. 7. Same as No. 1, only orange color 
and 7 inches wide. 



Canham Wood 




No. 9 



Combination Hanger 

(In two sizes, 17' ■_. inches and 15 inches) 



Canham 

Felt Grip 

Combination 

Hanger 




No. 11 




Canham 

Wishbone 

Hanger 



Guelph Factory in Operation 17 Years 
Buffalo Factory in Operation 12 Years 



EQ U I P M E N T A N I) Dl S P L A Y 



I II 



Now as Never Before 
You Need 

Markets Methods 
Ideas 

Right now, when lower prices are a 
daily feature and a hesitating public 
waiting for still lower levels, you want 
to be exactly informed on the latest 
prices and the most up-to-date fabric 
information. 

There's a mine of information on every 
page — merchandising ideas, fabric 
news, methods for cutting costs, 
speeding up sales, increasing the 
monthly turnover. 

Over two thousand leading merchants 
find it not only pays to read Men's 
Wear Review, but they set aside a 
specific part of arrival date to study 
the news for their business. 
The more you read Men's Wear Re- 
view the more you will profit. 

Men's Wear Review 

143-153 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada 



A PERSONALITY IN WAX 

Of StrikingBeauty and Life Likeness 




No. 509 -Head 136 

Write for photos and prices about this and our other Wax Beauties 

J. R. PALMENBERG'S SONS, Inc. 

63-65 WEST 36th ST., NEW YORK 

BOSTON CHICAGO BALTIMORE 

26 Kingston St. 204 W. Jackson BWd. 108 W. Baltimore St. 



Gipe- Hazard 
Store Service 

Co., Ltd. 

113 Sumach Stree 
Toronto - Ont. 




Every Merchant is concerned in a greater or less degree as to 
the best method of recording Sales and conveying money be- 
tween Salesmen and the place where it is to be deposited. We 
have a circular which explains some of the advantages of our 
Carrier System. Would you care to profit by reading? If so, 
a Post Card to us will bring it to you. 




When Mistakes Occur 



In the handling of thousands of subscriptions there must be a few mistakes. We try to eliminate all chance for 
errors — we have spent thousands of dollars on systems that seem to us as near error-proof as human ingenuity can 
make them. 

But sometimes they do occur. They are not intentional. We are very sorry to bill a man a second time when he has 
already paid, but it sometimes happens, but if you will tell us frankly about it you may rest assured this will be 
rectified immediately. But if for any reason you think we are not right, please drop us a note. Your clerks make 
mistakes, too, and you know how much it pleases you when a customer tells you frankly of his complaint — you look on 
him as a friend of the store. 

We feel just the same way and will venture this — that you have never in all your experience had a complaint with us, 
and you told us about it that it has not been made good at once. 

Two weeks ago a storekeeper in a small village explained to us she had been receiving Farmers' Magazine, whereas 
she ordered one of our trade papers. Her subscription was advanced one year from the date the complaint was 
reported to us. This was just a clerical error that was made good at once. 

If you have a complaint or think you have one, please communicate at once with the circulation manager. 



142 



Dry Goods Rerun 



Floor Coverings are Selling 

Splendid Demand Noticed Since Beginning of Year — Department Heads Tell How to Link 
Up Wallpaper, Floor Covering and Furnishing Departments to Give Best Service 

and Produce More Sales. 



ACCORDING to one of the leading 
Montreal houses dealing in floor 
coverings of all kinds English 
goods are regarded as a good proposition 
by Canadian wholesalers. Business gen- 
erally is expected to be very brisk by 
March in all lines of floor coverings. 

Linoleums are in high demand, parti- 
cularly in the hardwood parquetry ef- 
fects, which blend so well with most 
types of furnishings and make a good 
ground for showing up small Oriental or 
Wilton rugs. The retailer in Canada is 
now in a position to handle the new 
linoleum rugs very profitably, since it is 
possible to show the customer the sample 
range, take the order and have the rug 
in question sent direct to the customer 
from the manufacturer, all sealed in a 
tubular wrapping, protected from any 
possible damage. The advantages of this 
arrangement are manifold, not the least 
being the fact that no large and un- 
wieldy range of stock is necessary. 

In discussing the same questions with 
the manager of a progressive floor cov- 
ering department in one of the large 
stores, Dry Goods Review was informed 
that the woman who is shopping for a 
new carpet or rug is about the most dif- 
ficult customer to satisfy that the store 
has. She not only wants something dif- 
ferent from the ordinary in the way of a 
pattern, but wants it reasonably, and yet 
when she sees a number of samples 
spread out before her, she does not know 
what she wants at all. This store has 
found that it is better to stack carpets 
or rugs in piles of one pattern in all the 
different colors, so that a customer may 
judge just how her favorite design will 
look when developed in half a dozen dif- 
ferent shades. Also, this department 
stocks as many as 29 different sizes in 
one rug, varying from the small door- 
mat to the largest possible in size. 

There is no excuse, therefore, for a 
woman saying that she does not see the 
size she wants, as it can be brought out 
at a moment's notice. 

The most demand is noticed for dark 
colorings, stated this buyer, and in the 
case of Wilton rugs, the fringed edge is 
preferred. Three years ago, Tie continued, 
he. found that much business was lost by 
not having a wall-paper section close at 
hand to the carpet department, and so 
one was started on a small scale. He 
found that there was a close relation- 
ship between the floor and the walls of 
any room, in the minds of his customers, 
and therefore, in order to assist them in 
their choice of a rug, he always brings 
up the question of color schemes. If 
the customer seems inclined to consider 
the idea of repapering the room in ques- 




Lace Trimmed Shades 



New designs in oil color window shades, showing novelty lace treatment with 
braided motifs. — Shown by courtesy of the Daly & Morin Company, Ltd., Lachine, 
Quebec. 



tion, it is an irresistible selling argument 
to have a good supply of new papers, or 
at least a number of sample books at 
hand from which to match the colors of 
the rug with the walls. 

In another Montreal store, the house- 
furnishing department sends out its con- 
tract man in company with the salesman 
who took the order. The latter is always 
trained to understand fully the artistic 
values of draperies, paper, etc., and is, in 
addition, alive to the business possibili- 
ties latent in the least order received by 
the store. He will advise the proper 
treatment of walls, ceiling, floor and 
windows in their respective order of 
importance, and even advise as to furni- 
ture and decorations if desired. This 
form of store service is more profitable 
than is the often seen sample display of 
furnished rooms or model windows fea- 
tured in the majority of stores. 

As a general rule, stated one manager, 
do not show your customer the exact 
thing she wants right away. Show her 
several things first, and when she seems 
about to go elsewhere play your trump 
card, which answers her needs as nearly 
as you could gauge them, and the sale 
will be made. The same rule applies to 
carpets, curtains, etc., which are too 
often shown in profusion in such a way 



that the customer becomes utterly con- 
fused and decides that she does not see 
what she wants. Take her aside and show 
her one of the better grade lines in an- 
other light, against a different back- 
ground, away from all the others, and 
nine times out of ten you will clinch the 
sale. 

In the case of draperies, another little 
point should not be forgotten by sales 
clerks, namely, if the pattern is large and 
must be matched carefully, entailing 
wastage in cutting, advise the customer 
first, if this will materially add to the 
cost of the material, or else endeavor to 
utilize the wastage for cushions, etc., in 
the" store. Many customers are much 
pleased by this method of treatment by 
the store. 

New designs in floor lamps have just 
been shown for the Spi'ing sales, anc 1 
many lovely new finishes are provided 
with shades of every possible fabric and 
design. Tea carts and small bookcases 
are also having a phenomenally good 
sale at present. 

"Keep the housefurnishing department 
bright and attractive," said the man- 
ager, "and let customers handle goods 
as much as they want. Make it nome- 
like and full of inspiration and sugges- 
tion even to the casual shopper." 



Dry Goods Review 



I 13 



How to Care for Lace Curtains 






A VISIT was paid by a representa- 
tive of Dry Goods Review to the 
work rooms of a large Montreal 
curtain manufacturer this month, and, in 
the course of conversation with the man- 
ager, many interesting facts relative to 
the trade were elicited. Prices, it was 
stated, have dropped materially and one 
average line which heretofore has been 
quoted at $5.50 wholesale is now down 
to $3.30. Although cottons are down in 
price, yet the same reduction has not 
been felt in the case of curtain laces, 
the use of which is so strong a feature 
of the prevailing style to-day. Last 
Fall the sales of novelty curtains were 
comparatively small owing to the almost 
prohibitive prices asked, but under the 
new conditions, it is stated on good auth- 
ority, there is no better time than the 
present for buying. As in the case of 
other house furnishings, cretonnes, 
shades, etc., the manufacturers have cut 
prices down to the bone and are of the 
opinion that no further drop can now 
occur, particularly in view of the fact 
that the leading textile companies have 
recently recalled their lists and a rise 
in price is expected in cotton goods. 

Spring Lines 

New designs and better qualities are 
the significant selling points regarding 
Spring curtains, and in the opinion of 
the wholesalers the average merchant 
would do well to stress his displays more 
carefully this season. He should not 
strive to hold on to his stock at the 
original price but freshen it up at once 
with the new patterns, and mark it down 
with replacement values in mind. There 
is scarcely a home in Canada that is not 
in need of new curtain draperies and the 
retailer who has an assortment of the 
newest lace trimmed curtains, filet nets, 
sectional panellings or fancy embroid- 
ered novelty curtains will be the one to 
lead off when Spring housecleaning and 
May moving is under way. 

While all classes of curtain materials 
are in demand, an exceptional call has 
been felt for the sectional panellings 
since last year. This style will undoubt- 
edly become stronger during the next 
twelve months as well. One peculiarity 
of the trade noticed by the manufacturer 
was the fact that the large mail order 
houses handle practically nothing but 
white curtain fabrics, while the retailer 
prefers the ecru shades. No apparent 
reason can be given for this distinction. 




Ayrshire and Nottingham Curtains 

Double and single bordered net panels are being shown this Spring- On the left is 
a dotted ground with filet insets of a very dainty pattern. A single border in ecru nel 
with quaint corner motif is shown on the right. Courtesy Alexander Jamieson & Co.. 
Toronto. 



Brass goods and fixtures are decided- 
ly lower in price and are now available 
in every possible variety. Flat and 
curved extension rods, etc., should now 
be included in the Spring showing of 
house furnishings, as nothing is so es- 
sential to the appearance of the well- 
appointed room as the proper type of 
curtain fixtures. 

A Novel Exhibit 

One very striking curtain display fea- 
tured this month was shown by Good- 
win's, Limited, during their recent Feb- 
ruary home furnishings sale, when an 
entire window was devoted to the dis- 
play of- some half dozen beautiful lace 
curtains shown over unrolled sections of 
bright orange wallpaper. The display 
was brilliantly lighted and the effect o f 
the snowy curtains over the vividly 
toned paper, together with a background 
of tangerine colored drapery, was so 
startling as to attract the attention of 
almost every passerby on St. Catherine 
Street. Another beautiful display 
worthy of mention was that of a sit- 
ting room fitted up with sea grass and 
wicker furniture, upholstered in bright 
tinted cretonne, showing rose, mauve 
and black, and featuring the newest ob- 
long linen cushions in dull rose or purple. 
Jet black velvet rugs were laid over a 
large dove gray carpet, and the back- 
ground was of rose and black curtains. 
A tea set of mauve china was set invit- 
ingly upon the round wicker tea-table 
and a large mauve china cat was proudly 
ensconced upon a black rug. The new 
"chaise longue" was included among the 
furniture of this setting and proved al- 
most as attractive as the huge cretonne 
covered chesterfield which centred the 
display. An oblong mirror, heavily 
framed in black, completed this artistic 
window. 



How to Stretch Curtains 

Retailers should advise their custom- 
ers strongly against the use of curtain 
stretchers when they are purchasing new 
curtains, for nothing is more injurious 
to fine nets, lace trimmed or even scrim 
curtains as the sharp steel pins of the 
average stretcher. Furthermore, the 
stretcher is apt to make curtains hang- 
badly if perfect adjustment is not pos- 
sible. The manufacturer's method of 
pressing curtains is the only correct one 
and should be recommended by the sales 
clerk as follows: "If a large padded 
table is not available, lay a sheet or 
clean flannel blanket on the floor and 
stretch the curtain over it carefully, pin- 
ning the four corners first exactly at 
right angles one to the other, with at 
least six pins at each corner. If the 
curtain is still damp, press it firmly on 
both sides with a hot iron, doing both 
under and upper edges at one operation. 
If the curtain has dried out, lay a long 
strip of wet cheesecloth over the outer 
edge and press firmly until perfectly dry 
and smooth. If the pinning has been 
done accurately, the curtain should hang 
as straight as when it was new. In 
future, all curtains made by one Mont- 
real manufacturer will be accompanied 
by printed instructions regarding the 
correct methods of laundering and press- 
ing each style, and it is hoped that all 
complaints regarding these goods will 
thereby be done away with. The same 
maker advises retailers to urge their 
customers not to cut any extra material 
off when they find their curtains too 
long. Let this be doubled under, or 
made into a valance, etc., until after the 
curtains have had their first trip to the 
laundry. This simple matter is the 
source of a large number of complaints 
regarding shrinkage in window drapery 
fabi ics." 



w 



Dry Guods Review 



New Patterns Plentiful— Prices Down 



Montreal Drapery House Reports Excellent Variety in Spring Lines — Charming Large 
Patterns Featured — New Nets and Window Shades Will Also Enhance Drapery 

Department. 



k » 



D 



RAPERY prices are a' good 
proposition now," declared the 
head of a leading Montreal 
curtain and drapery firm to Dry Goods 
Review this month. "New patterns are 
plentiful and prices on the average are 
down one-third, at least, upon all lines. 
English goods of this description are on 
a par with prices quoted in November, 
1919. The drapery situation taken all 
round with reference to domestic and 
American markets shows a decided re- 
duction as well. The only class of goods 
which do not as yet reflect a satisfac- 
tory deflation are the Swiss nets, but 
for that matter neither French nor Swiss 
goods are a worth-while proposition for 
the retailer yet." 

Touching on the various kinds of dra- 
pery and upholstering fabrics at present 
in most demand, this manufacturer ex- 
hibited many exceedingly beautiful ex- 
amples of domestic cretonnes as well as 
exclusive novelties from the looms of the 
best English makers. Many large pat- 
terned cretonnes were in evidence dis- 
playing a departure from traditional 
ideas, and designed with artistic effect 
of a high order, hitherto confined to the 
most expensive qualities. One such cre- 
tonne featured a design depicting a 
quaint cottage window almost life-size 
in proportions with a bowl of colorful 
blossoms set in the opening against the 
light. The design was realistic and de- 
cidedly novel, besides being unusually 
artistic. The background was shown in 
several unobtrusive tints, including a 
dull blue, purple, etc. Another cretonne 
featured large ovals in a sharp contrast 
to the background, which would be par- 
ticularly effective in the Summer cot- 
tage or the bedroom. 

Designers of drapery fabrics have not 
overlooked the nursery this season and 
many fanciful and original conceptions 
are on the market, destined for decorat- 
ing nursery or bedroom as required. 
One line, which includes three color 
schemes among its backgrounds, features 
a complete circus including clowns and 
performing animals, depicted in a way 
to fascinate any child. 

There were also shown many new pat- 
terns in English block prints in the 
usual 31 -inch widths, which featured the 
new tawny browns and tans, so effective 
for library, dining room or den. But 
the most surprising improvement in the 
manufacture of household fabrics was 
that shown in the exhibit of Canadian 
made cotton tapestries for upholstering, 
etc These are made of fine mercerized 
yarns, all 50 inches wide, and are a tre- 
mendous improvement upon last year's 




Cretonnes From England 

Quaint and reminiscent of olden times 
are many of the lovely floral printed cre- 
tonnes being shown. Above is a Japanese 
tea house design; below a rich floral ground 
of English origin. — Courtesy Alexander 
Jamieson & Company. 



designs and qualities. The manufac- 
turer of this line of tapestries stated 
that he did not fear any competition on 
this line as already he is assured that 
90 per cent, of business in furniture 
goods will be done in cotton tapestries 
during the coming months. The exam- 
ples shown feature a subdued blending 
of rose and green on black, in a conven- 
tional, neat design. Until the present 
the manufacturer could not afford to 
take the previous patterns off his looms, 
so great was the demand for this class 
of goods, but with the introduction of 
this marvellous improvement, he is an- 
ticipating a tremendous run of business. 

Filet Nets 

Among the other lines of drapery 
goods for which a large demand is now 
being experienced are the 16-point filet 
nets. The increasing demand for furni- 
ture in period designs is being reflected 
in draperies as well, and the up-to-c|ate 
retailer must be prepared to feature 
nets and panellings in the proper de- 
signs common to the Queen Anne or 



Empire periods, etc. These patterns 
usually run to the lai'ge sizes, but there 
is a strong demand for the small 
"clover" patterns and other small fig- 
ures, which are still exceedingly difficult 
to secure. Most mills still prefer to 
make up the smaller patterns as they 
are naturally the easiest to turn out. 

Colored Borders 

Colored border scrims which have 
been off the market for some time are 
now quite plentiful and are very mode- 
rately priced. And many plain colored 
marquisettes are shown which have in- 
finite possibilities for the drapery de- 
partment. Prices on curtain scrims, 
which formerly ranged from 32% cents 
upwards, now begin at 12% cents, and 
are practically guaranteed to stand 
throughout the next six months. Cre- 
tonnes which formerly were quoted at 
47% cents are now 32 cents, and Terry 
cloth draperies in lovely new colorings 
have dropped from $2.70 down to $1.10. 
Fringes, tapestry gimps and galloons 
are also approximately one-third cheaper 
than in 1920, and ball fringes in differ- 
ent sizes and colors also show a marked 
decline. Rope portieres, which have a 
decided vogue in smaller towns and have 
been practically out of sight in price, 
are now obtainable, almost at former 
i-ates, in a large assortment of colors. 
With Summer only a short way off, it 
is not too early to consider the purchase 
of verandah blinds or slat shades. 
These come in many different colorings 
and are well finished in every particular. 
For the Summer cottage or city balcony 
these cool and decorative blinds should 
have a wide appeal. 

The average retailer is perhaps un- 
aware of the fact that in spite of the 
widespread impression that almost every 
Canadian manufacturer has either closed 
down or has materially reduced his pro- 
duction, there are a number of the lat- 
ter who have kept running in the face 
of prevailing adverse conditions, and 
who have built up a large reserve stock 
of goods, which they are now prepared 
to offer to the trade at prices varying 
from 25 to 40 per cent, lower than those 
quoted last year. Drastic cuts have gone 
into force since December last, and in 
most cases the new rates are to be up- 
held until Midsummer. The recent cuts 
are not likely to disturb the trade in any 
way and no further drop is anticipated, 
as the manufacturer has abided by the 
policy of taking his loss at once. 

Window Shades 

In discussing the* present situation in 
the window shade trade, Dry Goods Re- 



Th-ii Goods Review 



II () U S K K I) \l N I S J I 1 N G S 



14. 




An U prto-date Department 



A splendid view of the Hamilton Company's housefurnishing department. Montreal, showing the effective 
display of floor coverings, including a complete range of rugs in all sizes. 



view is informed that this class of goods 
has also undergone the same deflation 
as regards prices. One Montreal manu- 
facturer stated that he considered that 
the average retailer did not understand 
the possibilities latent in a stock of 
window shades and he instanced the fact 
that the trimmed shade is far more pro- 
fitable to the retailer, more decorative 
as a display feature, and more suitable 
for use with the prevailing style of fur- 
nishings in vogue in better class homes. 
It is up to the retailer to push trimmed 
blinds, he said, and to make an effort 
to match the blinds with curtains or 
draperies, thereby making a double sale. 
To retail window shades successfully, a 
display of at least ten or a dozen sam- 
ples should be prominently featured on 
racks which will permit the shades to be 
pulled up or down as required. The 
common custom of keeping the shades 
hidden away down underneath the coun- 
ter or in a store room is absolutely fatal 
to the establishment of a successful 
trade. Even the small store can feature 
a single display of a mock window, fitted 
with shade, net or lace curtains ana suit- 
able over-drapery and this idea if car- 
ried out with care and an eye to details 
should sell the goods better than any 
amount of salesmanship. Retailers, 



moreover, seem to be afraid of attempt- 
ing to handle any special orders for their 
customers, which, after all, is a simple 
matter nowadays. If the goods ordered 
are by any chance carried in the regular 
stock of the manufacturer, they will be 
shipped the same day that the order is 
received, and, in the case of something 
special, care is taken to ensure shipment 
with the least possible delay. The cul- 
tivation of special orders would be pro- 
fitable for most retailers who handle win- 
dow shades as well as the stocking of 
more varieties in both water colors and 
oil colors. With a range of at least five 
grades and numberless colorings to se- 
lect from, there is no reason why the 
coming Spring season should find the 
retailer unprepared for the army of 
householders who desire new shades. 

With regard to window shade pulls 
and tassels, it should be borne in mind 
that the manufacturers carry a range of 
at least twenty different styles and 
prices on these lines varying from the 
cheapest metal rings to the finest cover- 
ed ring-tassels, costing about $1.50 a 
dozen. Care » should also be exercised 
by the retailer to see that his customer 
secures the proper pull for the shades 
selected, and these should be attached 



by the retailer and not sent separately, 
as often happens. 

Western Canada, according to this 
maker, prefers the plainer shades, 
while the East shows a liking for trim- 
med styles. Heavy lace edges seem to 
go best in Quebec and Ontario, while 
insertions of conservative design are; 
favored by the Maritime Provinces. The 
frequent assertion made by travellers 
from these different sections that their 
customers will not look at anything dif- 
ferent is considered a mistake, and re- 
tailers are urged to adopt a different 
attitude and try to awaken an interest 
in something out of the stereotyped line 
of goods. 



RUG SALE AT ALTMAN'S 

B. Altman & Co. opened the new year 
with a gigantic Oriental rug sale, prep- 
arations for which have been "in the 
making" for many months. In this sale, 
which lasted throughout January, prac- 
tically every Oriental rug in their stock, 
which is probably the largest in the 
United States, was included. The price 
reductions figure up 'to 50 per cent, on 
the values at which the goods have been 
held in stock. 



i k! 



HOUSE FT I; NISHINQS 



/>/'(/ QOOdlt Hi vit II 



^ .—-!• g eq. h. MFrysrrar 







Increase Your Sales 



Your Shade Department sales can be increased by carrying 
one or two attractive patterns of Lace Trimmed Shades. This 
illustrated shade can be made up with the insertion alone or with 
the lace alone and stock sufficient for all purposes need not be 
very large. A few dozen 37" and an assortment of other widths 
is sufficient, made in white, cream or green. The windows of a 
house are the most attractive parts from the Street, and a well- 
trimmed window shade is an ornament as well as being useful. 

We also make Tapestry Covering, "Sleepwell" Comforters 
and Pillows, Drapery Brass Goods, Novelty Curtains and all 
classes of Drapery Fabrics. 



GEO. H. HEES, SON & CO. Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 



Dry Goods R< vieiv 



HOUSK FURNISHINGS 



1 i' 




148 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Review 



I Qo?v3SG?G"3336^OT(5?Gf<Di^^ 



Prime & Rankin Limited 



O 



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f* 
7* 

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TJA 

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Handkerchiefs 

A wealth of variety in new- 
effects, and the matchless values 
we are offering, assure us unusu- 
ally good business in this Dept. 

SPECIAL ASSORTMENTS AT 
SPECIAL PRICES 



These special assortments are 
well adapted for Merchants who 
hox their own Handkerchiefs. We 
supply attractive boxes at mini- 
mum cost. Box your own Hand- 
kerchiefs, and reap the reward in 

BETTER BUSINESS AND 
BETTER PROFITS 



CURTAINS AND DRAPERY 
MATERIALS 

Now showing for present deliv- 
ery, very complete assortments of 
Curtain Nets, Cretonnes, Scrims, 
Lace Curtains, Swiss Curtains, 
Point Arabian Curtains, and 
Windsor Scrim and Marquisette 
Curtains. 



To-day's new 'prices are moving 
goods rapidly — many lines are 
priced considerably below replace- 
ment values. 



t 



Prime & Rankin, Limited 




22 Warser Gate 
Nottingham, England 



74 York St. 
Toronto 







Dry Goodg Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



149 




PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers of 

Window Shades and Shade Cloth 

Novelty Curtains and Piece Goods 
Cretonnes and Tapestries 

Drapery Materials and Portieres 
Table and Couch Covers 

Importers and Wholesale Suppliers of: 

Nottingham Curtain Nets and Lace Curtains 
Upholstery Fabrics, Velours, Casement 
Cloths, etc. 
Upholstery Hardware and Brass 
Goods 

Carpet Sweepers, Hammocks, etc. 



DALY & MORIN, limited 

HEAD OFFICE AND FACTORIES : LACHINE, P.Q. 



PERMANENT SALESROOMS in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Montreal, Quebec and Halifax 
Also Travelling Representatives in all Provinces 




HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Review 




A BILTMORE CREATION 



Biltmore Curtains 

Mean 

More Sales 

The practical woman demands quality which 
make- the Biltmore Curtains stand out more 
prominently than ever. If (here is one thing 
i hat stands out more prominently than their 
quality, it is their excellent values. 

We invite all Curtain Buyers* inspection of our 
line and sincerely believe they also will be con- 
vinced that 

BILTMORE CURTAINS ARE THE ONES 
TO BUY THIS SPRING 

If this sounds a trifle exaggerated to you, look- 
over our line and see for yourself whether or 
not we are delivering the goods. 

Tt won't take you long to make up your mind 
that ours is the best line. 

BILTMORE CURTAIN CO. 

LIMITED 

332 Craig St. West - MONTREAL 

Western Representative : 

I. M. OSLER, 606 Builders Exchange Winnipeg, Man. 



Pattern 410 24 in. and 36 in. in Stock 

COTT-A-LAP RUG BORDERS, SURROUNDS and FLOOR COVERINGS 

Latest patterns in stock, 24-in., 36-in., and 72-in. wide, for Immediate Delivery. 

Our Salesmen are showing samples of Cott-a-lap products which are growing in popularity- 
Lies flat and requires no tacks. 
Inquiries solicited and samples cheerfully submitted. 

SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS 

GREENSHIELDS LIMITED 

Wholesale Distributors of Carpets and Draperies 

MONTREAL 




I) [{ V GOODS REVIEW 



l.'.l 




Brighten Up Your 
Drapery Department! 



Choose from our— 

Nottingham Curtains 
Shadow Cloths 
Aurora Casement Cloths 
Mercerized Poplins 
White and Ecru Madras 



Novelty Curtains 
Muslins 
Bungalow Nets 
Self Color Madras 
Mixed Color Madras 



and Tapestries 



N, 



ew 

Spring 



JVIercha n dise 



The retailer's best salesman is an 
adequate display of Merchandise. 

Business will be as good as you 
make it, as your Customers will buy 
if they see what they want. Hold 
the Drapery business "in town" this 
season, and you will hold lots of 
other sales also. 

Let us supply the lines which will 
compel attention. Our range is so 
wide and varied we can assist you to 
meet every requirement. Our prices 
are right. 

John King & Sons Scotch Hollands 

White. Cream and Ivy. All widths, 30" to 60". 

In stock. 

Agents for: Wm. Strang & Son, Glasgow, Scotland; 
Hood, Morton & Co.. Newmilns, Scotland; Stirling. 
Auld & Co., Darvel, Scotland. 

Representatives: R. F. Hick, J. G. Donald. Wm. 
Sneddon (W. G. McJannett. Manager). 



J. B. Henderson & Company 

LIMITED 



KST\KLISHED }0 YEARS 



80 Bay Street 



Toronto 




"1921 will Reward the Fighters" 

British Made 
Goods 

Plorrockses, Crewdson & Co., Limited. 
Cotton Manufacturers, Manchester, 
England. 

Jaffe Bros., Limited, Linen Manufac- 
turers, Belfast, Ireland. 

Miller & Porteous, Limited, "Skeldon" 
Blanket Manufacturers, Ayr, Scot- 
land. 

Newman, Smith & Newman, Limited, 
Draperies, Comforters, etc., London, 
England. 



WE CAN GIVE IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
FROM STOCK OF 

BRITISH PRINTED VOILES 

in attractive colours and designs, 40" 
wide at 90c and $1.25 per yard. 



HORROCKSES DIAPHELENE 

(The Cotton that looks like Silk) 

Colours — Cream, Pink, Flesh, Sky, 
I 'ale Blue, Maize, Light Heliotrope and 
White, 42" wide, at 65c per yard. 

FOR DELIVERY IN MARCH 



REVISED PRICES THROUGHOUT 
ON ALL MERCHANDISE 



Cottons, 

Sheetings, 

Flannelettes, 

Down Quilts, 

Cretonnes, 

Comforters. 



Fine Nets, 

Casement Cloths. 

Blankets, 

Rugs, 

Fancy Linens, 

Apron Cloths, 



Handkerchiefs, 
Table Cloths, 
Table Napkins, 
Bath Towels, 
Linen Huck, Towels, 
etc., etc. 



Prices quoted for import or F.O.B. Montreal 



If not on mailing list, please write 
CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 

JOHN E. RITCHIE 

Dry Goods Commission Agent 

591 St. Catharine St. W. 

Montreal, Que. 



64 Wellington St. W. 
Toronto. 



BRANCHES: 

815 Pender St. W. 
Vancouver. B.C. 

29 Minshull St.. Manchester. Eng. 



IV. 



Dry Goods Review 



Between Seasons in Paris 

Dark Frocks Are Donned in Paris, Vivid Hues and White Serge Accompany Milady to Cannes. 

and the Riviera, While Furs and Sports Toggery Are Fashioned For Those Who 

Turn North to the Alps Rather Than South to Nice. 

Trcoislated from Femina 



JUST now, smart Parisiennes are not 
ordering: much in the way of 
clothes, both because of economy 
and because it is the ebb of the season. 
Evening gowns are worth a small for- 
tune nowadays, and so "les Parisiennes 
elegantes" are exhuming from their 
wardrobes and attics garments which 
have slept undisturbed for years per- 
haps, and from the embroideries, laces 
or furs taken therefrom, are evolving 
mid-season creations of exceptional 
charm. 

For dinners or private receptions it is 
considered correct to dress as elaborately 
as of yore, but it must be confessed that 
Parisiennes are dressing far less 
gorgeously for the theatre than they 
used to, and often a simple chemise 
blouse of one of the lovely embroidered 
fabrics, without sleeves and designed 
with a low cut neck line is noted. Or 
la Parisienne may wear one of those 
draped velvet or satin frocks which are 
unadorned except for the jewelled band- 
ing or beaded festoon which all the 
world affects just now. Voila, what the 
smart woman of Paris is wearing. 

Furthermore, it is nowadays the fash- 
ion for madame to keep her fur wrap 
about her, whether she is seated in a 
box or in the orchestra stalls, and this 
little device permits her to wear, under- 
neath, that little frock which she is so 
tired of appearing in for the nth time in 
public. With the cost of living where 
it is at present, all Paris is economizing, 
but one must use one's imagination in 
order to achieve a little variety in the 
daily toilette. 

It is not eon->i ; ored a faux pas to 
transform one's cast off clothing into 
something more up-to-date and "trans- 
formation robes," as they are known, 
are quite accepted in the smart ward- 
robe. Just now it is the month when 
everyone is thinking of locking her 
trunks and setting forth for Cannes, 
Nice or Monte Carlo, in search of the 
sunshine which has fled from Paris. Nat- 
urally, the frocks which are being packed 
for this delightful journey are not the 
long and clinging garments which have 
been so greatly worn this winter, but 
rather jaunty tailor-mades of white 
serge, gray velours, or checked woollens, 
made with rather short straight skirts. 
But outside of the tailored costumes, 
skirts are showing more length and some 
are widening as well. Little by little 
our eyes are becoming accustomed to 
this new silhouette and we can find it in 
our hearts even to discard our last year 




A Lucile Creation 

Superb frock of peach colored taffeta, ele- 
gantly trimmed and embroidered in the true 
Lucile fashion — flowers in pastel tints and 
a lace pettiskirt being characteristic 
touches. 



dresses which were so absurdly short 
and looked like sub-deb. apparel. Cer- 
tain skirts, which are quite a little ful- 
ler and longer, which were recently of- 
fered tentatively by the couturieres as a 
fantasy almost, have an unexpected suc- 
cess, much more than was hoped for, 
and those women who affect the most 
extreme ideas in fashions have decided 
that there is nothing long enough for 
them this season, whereas last spring 
there was nothing short enough. And 
so it goes. 

Is it as a sort of compromise between 
the devotees of short and long skirts 
that certain models show an irregular 
length ? Who has not noticed the sud- 



den popularity of a certain type of 
frock, which is rather short at the sides, 
but longer in front and behind in such 
a way as to show the lining of the 
skirt. One such, of black tp.ffeta, em- 
broidered in mother of pearl, is worn 
by Mile. Berthe Bovy at the Theatre 
Francais and is strikingly new. Cer- 
tainly this irregular effect which is so 
striking in the wider skirt models, seems 
more natural when adapted to the long 
waisted slips which are all the rage 
just now. 

Irregular Lines in Vogue 

As a matter of fact, present day styles 
are all showing this note of irregularity,, 
especially the curve of the lower hem,, 
the drapery at the hips, the line of the 
tunic peplum, the placing of the belt 
even, which is usually higher in front 
than behind or vice versa, besides the 
sleeves which are often of different 
lengths, one being quite short while the 
other reaches the wrist. This fantastic 
notion reminds one of two distinct gowns 
pieced together to make one, and how- 
ever amusing it may be, one would nat- 
urally prefer a gown characterized by 
an effect of unity and simplicity. We 
are apt to abuse, methinks, our use of 
those floating ends of material which 
hang below the skirt hem or are mounted 
rather aimlessly upon the waist, in a 
manner reminiscent of tatters and rags. 
These points or ends of material in vary- 
ing lengths have already been noted, 
especially when they are made of a 
large square of fabric, caught here and 
there to the foundation, the ends hang- 
ing down like floating handkerchiefs. 
These loose ends may also be found 
draped over the bodice and caught by 
a chain of beads about the wearer's 
neck. These odd points are even used 
to create entire sleeves, which, however, 
only half cover the arm but are caught 
to the wrist in a snug fitting bracelet. 
The slit sleeve, either lengthways, or 
across or slantingwise, which allows, a 
tiny glimpse of the wearer's arm either 
above or below the elbow is noticed in 
one form or another on almost every 
dress this season. 

The corsage also features this unex- 
pected touch and often seem as though 
they had been slit by a pair of scissors 
in such a way as to afford a glimpse of 
a throat or the back, as though the 
dressmaker found the model with its 
high choker collar reaching to the ears 
and sleeves reaching to the fingers a 
little austere in effect. And presto! she 
cuts a slash here or there and binds it 



Dry Goods Review 



K K A I) V -TO- W K A Ii 



L53 



with a narrow bias banding or a picot 
edge, and behold, a frock of the most 
original charm, which may afford a 
glimpse of satiny skin or merely a lin- 
ing of another color. 

For Mountain Peaks 

But besides the season in the south, 
there is also our winter sports season 
when the silvery slopes of the Pyrenees 
and the Alps lure countless devotees of 
the ski and the bobsleigh to revel in 
their delights. And so for them the 
shops are showing wonderful scarves of 
Kashavella, huge shawls of Gaurisankar, 
a woollen fabric as soft as silk and warm 
as fur which are to be worn especially 
with frocks of Buracotta or wraps of 
Velursine. Among the novelties of the 
season in this type of accessory should 
be mentioned the new fabrics resembling 
Oriental carpet, which I personally do 
not much care for nor consider to be 
suitable to the feminine toilette. Be- 
sides, there are several new materials 
adapted from the fabrics of North 
African tribes, which make original 
trimming if nothing else. 

Grey 

For miladi who travels to the Midi, 
the new soft, fur finished fabrics will 
take the place of heavier furs, and one 
of the smartest of the season's models 
is a large cape of heavy satin lined 
throughout with this heavy Agnella as 
it is called, which comes in gray, af- 
fording a striking contrast to a black 
outer material. The all gray outfit is, 
however, the smartest and is particu- 
larly lovely, especially when costume, 
toque, stockings, shoes and handbag are 
all of one tone of soft gray. Even in 
the evening this fad for neutral color 
is carried out in velvet or crepe Marie- 
Louise, trimmed with beading or steel 
cabochons, the latter being especially 
well liked. 

Among other colors which are enjoy- 
ing the preference of the moment should 
be mentioned all the red* shades, espe- 
cially Etruscan red, which has a golden 
tone, and the brick shades which are so 
cleverly combined with black in one 
atelier in the Place Vendome as well as 
with chestnut in a certain other show- 
room in the Champs Elysees. There are 
certain garnet reds which we should 
have declared to be hideous a year ago, 
and other rose reds like reflections of 
a sunrise, which are lovely beyond 
words. But such colors as these should 
be used with moderation. Black and 
white still remain the most popular 
tones, for all that we may chatter of 
reds and jades'. 

The Vogue of the Shawl 

Are we to witness a revival of the 
shawls of our grandmothers? The 
manufacturers of fabrics talk of noth- 
ing else, it seems, and are offering us 
plain colored cashmeres in warm tones 
for wear in the sunny climes of the 
Riviera. The shawl, at any rate, seems 




A Grey Top Coat 

A smart long coat wrap for Spring designed 
on the approved slender lines and grace- 
fully belted, pocketed and collared — De- 
signed for Dry Goods Review. 



to have inspired some of the capes of 
the season, for at the theatre, both on 
the stage and in the audience, one often 
sees large, voluminous cape wraps 
smoothly draped about the shoulders 
and body and simply trimmed with a 
banding of triple ribbon border outlin- 
ing the lower edge. These capes are 
generally a little shorter than the frocks 
over which they are worn. In any case, 
the wrap which is decidedly shorter than 
its frock is by no means rare nowadays. 
When both wrap and gown are the same 
length the effect decidedly enhances the 
silhouette, but when they are of differ- 
ent lengths, the thought is apt to enter 
one's mind that the skirt has been 
lengthened according to fashion's decree 
while the wrap (being of last year's 
vintage) permits a good deal of it to 
be visible. 

Embroidery has been somewhat neg- 
lected of late upon heavy Winter coats 
on account of the popularity of wide fur 
bandings, but now it reappears upon 



Spring models, more particularly upon 
the coat-frocks and redingotes which are 
distinctly the mode in the Midi at pres- 
ent. Supple, medium weight cloths are 
preferred for semi-tailored costumes, 
embroidery and braidings being the 
most favored trimming. It is really a 
miracle that embroidery has continued 
to be popular for so long, but it is 
probably due to the fact that it comes 
out in a new guise every season and 
captivates feminine hearts anew. Just 
now the super heavy, vividly colored em- 
broidery is out of favor, but those geo- 
metrically designed motifs inspired by 
Roumanian craft work, and designs 
which imitate braidings or ribbon work, 
or the flower or animal motif applica- 
tions beloved of the Russian peasant, 
are frequently seen and promise a wide 
vogue. 

On certain crepes and silk cashmeres, 
large round or square motifs are being 
used, worked at intervals all over the 
fabric and also bandings made of coarse 
stitchery or enormous chain-stitching 
done very closely, giving the effect of 
wide satin ribbon trimming. 

Dark Shades in Paris 

In Paris, all smart women continue to 
wear dark gowns. Never have so many 
tailored frocks and dark colored wraps 
been seen before. Some of the latter 
are lightened by the use of gray fur. or 
a vivid embroidery but the greater num- 
ber remain absolutely untrimmed. Un- 
der the sunny skies of the Cote d'Azur 
such sombre garments have a decidedly 
dreary appearance, and so, when we 
leave for Cannes, we must not forget 
to include a coat and skirt of white 
serge, some frocks of cashmere fabric 
in a warm color and plenty of warm 
sweaters in the brightest tones possible. 
In the Midi, one's fur wrap is useless, 
being too heavy and cumbersome, and 
for slipping over the afternoon frock 
one must have one of those amusing 
little cape wraps like shawls, mentioned 
above, made of satin lined with woollen 
material, to be in the forefront of 
fashion. Black may be used for the 
outer part, but the lining must be a 
decided contrast. 



Eric W. Gibberd, advertising 
manager of R. H. & J. Dowler, 
Ltd., with stores in London, St. 
Thomas, Windsor and Sarnia, in 
his second article, written es- 
pecially for Dry Goods Review 
on advertising points to four car- 
dinal points always to be borne in 
mind by the writer of advertise- 
ments. They are: — 

1. Its appearance must attract 
attention. 

2. Its copy and "story" must get 
and maintain the reader's interest. 

3. Its argument must create de- 
sire of ownership. 

U- And either its price or time- 
liness must stimulate action. 



!•".» 



Dry Goods Rt vi< " 



Navy for Street— Tweed for Sports 

Coats Are Known by Their Sleeves Closely Fitted Lines Strictly Observed and Various 
Lengths Are Permitted — Shoulder and Armhole Perfectly Kitted — Much Leniency 
Permitted in Choice of Suit Styles — Cape Effects Very Smart. 



SUIT-MAKERS have had their trou- 
bles ever since the one-piece dress 
arrived and entrenched itself, and 
these troubles have been the cause of 
heroic efforts on the part of the manufac- 
turers to stimulate renewed interest by 
the attractive novelties featured. For 
the coming Spring the line-up of models 
is by far the most attractive seen in 
years and reflects that minute attention 
to fine workmanship which is so marked 
a feature of the dress industry. 

Fine navy blue tricotine is still ahead 
of other fabrics in popularity for the 
dressy and semi-dressy street suit, while 
rough Canadian homespun or Irish tweed 
makes up best in the strictly tailored, 
mannish styles. A marked demand for 
reindeer, beaver or sand shades is also 
recorded by the makers just now, as be- 
ing more appropriate for the warmer 
months, but navy is by all odds the 
"best seller." The majority of the better 
class suits do not show any over-elab- 
oration, but are modelled upon the most 
conservative and simple lines. The box 
coat in short hip length fastening with 
one or perhaps two large bone buttons 
in front, and with a neat Peter Pan collar 
finished with a silk cord or very narrow 
ties of the tricotine is the leader for 
misses. The coat may be slashed up on 
each under-arm seam and laced up with 
cord or bound with black silk braid. It 
may be lightly embroidered in fine de- 
signs or beaded in combination with a 
touch of metallic thread, but generally 
in the more expensive lines, the un- 
trimmed effects are most called for. 

Sleeves are an important feature of 
the Spring suit, and may be long and 
very close fitting for the tailored model 
or three-quarter length and flaring in 
more elaborate designs. The shoulder 
and armhole must be perfectly smooth 
and fitted snugly to the figure without a 
trace of fullness. Fancy cuffs are used 
on the shorter sleeves, especially those 
which are designed in strap effect ex- 
tending several inches, or turned up on 
the outside of the sleeve to form a con- 
trasting facing. 

The skirts of the new suits are still 
cut on conservative lines, and are very 
little wider at the hem. The vogue for 
belts of self material continues, and 
small slanting slit pockets are the only 
feature in the way of elaboration. 
Touches of braiding may of course be 
to strengthen the relationship be- 
tween coat and skirt, but the preference 
with smart women is to have the blouse 
express the note of color, embroidery or 
other elaboration, which is really out of 
in heavier material. 




Swagger Check Suit 

The short boxy coats are particularly smart 
when materials are fancy. This jaunty 
trotteur for morning wear illustrates a 
number of very modish features in its neat 
high collared jacket and straight short 
skirt. 



The new coats show a leaning toward? 
vests of one kind or another or a modi- 
fication of the tuxedo collar, widened to 
resemble a vest front. 

All Styles Are Welcome 

Just to show that variety is the spice 
of life in style development as well as 
in things generally, coat designers are 
showing a line-up that includes the loose 
and flowing cape, the semi-fitted sports 
coat in short length, and decidedly dressy 
coats which follow the lines of the figure 
quite closely and are often elaborately 
trimmed. The designs do not show any 
startling or extreme style features, al- 



though the lines being brought out are 
sufficiently different from those in vogue 
bst Winter to make them decidedly in- 
teresting. Full length coats are not seen 
very often in the new lines, yet at the 
same time it cannot be said that the 
Spring garments are short. The popular 
length shows about five inches of the 
; kirt hem, but just how long a coat 
should be must be decided by the height 
of the individual by whom it is to be 
worn. To describe a coat length as 48, 
50 or 52 inches would not be doing justice 
to the subject. A few inches of skirt 
should be visible — that is the one point 
that seems quite definite. 

Vivid Hues Will Flourish 

As to materials, a good many rather 
high colors will be featured in the newest 
wraps, but navy and the soft sands and 
grays that seem to belong to Spring will 
be as popular as ever. Bold, striking- 
plaids play an important part in coats 
for travel and motor wear, the English 
mixtures being extremely smart. Dressy 
wraps are made of such materials as 
taffeta and other heavy silks, and one 
charming model made of faille had a 
rather full skirt formed of panels of the 
silk held in harem style at the hem. The 
coat was lined throughout with pale 
gray crepe de Chine. The circular ten- 
dency has extended somewhat to wraps 
as well as to other lines of outer apparel, 
a good many circular capes being seen. 
One novelty three-quarter length coat re- 
cently displayed had plain straight front 
sections, the back and sides below the 
waist line consisting of two deep circular 
flounces set ofte above the other. The 
sleeves were finished with circular cuffs 
and the coat was made entirely of Amer- 
ican beauty colored velour. Capes have 
really never been out of fashion at any 
time since they were introduced many 
seasons ago, but during some seasons 
their vogue is more noticeable than in 
others, but for sports wear it has never 
been excelled. A heavy wool jersey cloth 
jacket of the sleeveless type with a long 
circular cape of the same fabric was no- 
ticed lately. The jacket and cape were 
detachable and were therefore doubly 
useful to their owner. This was worn 
with a skirt of vividly striped wool in a 
harmonizing color, and made an unusu- 
ally chic outfit. 

Novelty Wraps Showing 

Some of the novelty wraps brought out 
feature Balkan lines, that is, a scant 
blouse with a deep, wide belt, the back 
of the coat being a circular cape, coming 
two or three inches below the waist line 



Dm (loodx /.'< 



K E A D Y-TO- W E A R 



L55 



and being attached to the sleeve in a sort 
of wing fashion. An unusually clever 
combination dressy and practical coat- 
wrap introduced by a Montreal maker is 
of supple navv broadcloth, designed with 
a very loose box-back in three-quarter 
length, the neck finished with a long 
scarf with heavily tasselled ends of the 
same fabric, which could be twisted round 
the wearer's throat and flung over the 
shoulder or allowed to hang down either 
side in stole fashion. Full-length box 
plaits pressed flat are a feature of the 
newest polo coats of sand or Pekin blue, 
belted and pocketed sensibly. Beaver 
broadcloth is elaborately embroidered in 
heavy black designs and set off with long- 
gold bugle beads. These will be worn 
over Summer dance frocks later on. 



TO VISIT TORONTO 

Alfred J. Burrows, Canadian repre- 
sentative of Dobsons and M. Browne & 
Co., Ltd., lace curtain manufacturers of 
Nottingham, England, has sailed for 
Canada and importers who wish to get 
into touch with him may send their 
inquiries to Queen's Hotel, Toronto. 



Spring Encourages Novelty 

Dainty Blouses Show Unusual Treatment of Fabric and Trimming 
Satins, (Georgettes and Organdies Seen in Many 
Lovely Colors — Skirts, Too, Are Unusually 
Attractive Big Plaids Are Seen. 



THIS season sees the fashion for 
elaborate blouses well established, 
and the endeavor at present is to 
create blouses which will combine satis- 
factorily with the quiet tones of the new 
suits, yet convey that subtle air of indi- 
viduality and unusual style which is ev- 
ery woman's secret ambition to possess. 
There are many things to be considered 
in selecting a blouse besides novelty and 
price — there is the figure, complexion and 
occupation of the wearer to take into 
consideration and by such points as these 
is the success or failure of a blouse 
purchase reckoned. 

The greatest possible latitude is per- 
missible in the designing and develop- 
ment of blouses, which long ago ceased 
to be classed as "waists" or "shirt- 
waists." 

The general rule for Spring is hip 
length or thereabouts as to length 
proper, and a trifle below the elbow as 
regards the sleeves. Even in the more 
elaborate blouses, however, some full 




For The 
Small Hat 

A new Spring veil, 
with chenille dot 
corner designs in 
black. Shown by 
Canada Veiling Co., 
Ltd. 



length sleeves appear. Ultra short 
sleeves seem tabooed by smart women. 
The neck may be oval or V-shaped, as 
well as high in the tailored models, but 
the low-cut necks are usually collarless. 
Many of the new blouses have elon- 
gated front sections, with waist length 
back. One blouse of this type recently 
seen was of pale gray crepe de Chine, 
embroidered in dull blue, the narrow sash 
be't attached at either side and tied at 
the back in a large butterfly bow (the 
waist finish par excellence this season). 
' A little round collar of gray was faced 
with the blue to show a piping. 

The different crepe weaves of silk are 
being prominently featured lately in 
smart semi-tailored lines, with the new 
"shirt-bosom" front, often fagoted by 
hand to the blouse proper. Such colorful 
combinations as tomato crepe with pearl 
gray, or henna and tangerine are becom- 
ing frequent in the pre-Easter displays 
of smart Montreal shops. 

The vogue for those shades varying 
from palest cream down through cham- 
pagne, apricot, cafe au lait, ecru, sand, 
beaver and the pheasant shades, is con- 
sidered smarter than the ultra-vivid 
tones and many wonderful collections of 
hand-made importations are now being 
got ready for the Spring openings. Love- 
ly filet laces are profusely used to edge 
the flowing tuxedo collars or jabot 
fronts of the more tailored types, as well 
as to lend a note of transparency to the 
heavier crepes. Drawn work was never 
more lovely than in combination with 
these laces and seems destined to pro- 
long its popularity throughout the 
Summer. 

Many delightful new tie over blouses 
aref shown in pastel shades, trimmed 
with bits of the new galloon braid or em- 
broidery which Paris has taken up. One 
such model of peach crepe de Chine had 
a flat oblong collar of this unique braid 
.embroidery, together with a wide belt 
effect of the same and touches at the 
cuffs. A pale gray georgette model 
showed another variety of this trim- 
ming, and attracted much comment. 

In White, Vividly Trimmed 

A wonderful creation of soft white 
satin, elaborately trimmed with bead and 
silk embroidery carried out in vivid red, 
was seen this month. It was one of the 
long slip-over models, girdled with red 
beads, and had long tailored sleeves set 
into a dropped armhole. A deep yoke of 
the embroidery finished the front of the 
blouse, which was intended for wear with 

Continued on page 157 



L56 



Dry Goods Review 



Canadian Makers Offer Splendid Lines 

Spring Offerings of Ready-to-Wear Manufacturers Show Gratifying Improvement in Many 

Wavs — Workmanship of the Best and Styles Appealing in Their Suggestion of 

Quaint Directoire Modes — Circular Effects Gain Favor. 



LET enthusiasts rave as they will 
over the model garments imported 
from abroad or even from New 
York, the fact remains that the Canadian 
er has surpassed himself this sea- 
son and at least one house may lay 
claim to the distinction of selling its 
frocks, manufactured in Montreal, in the 
United States, in the very face of the 
competition which we thought well-nigh 
insuperable. This particular collection 
which is just ready for inspection inter- 
prets the prevailing tendency to get. 
away from the banal and commonplace 
and "to present instead those demure and 
stately fashions which are inspired by 
the historic Directoire period from 
France or the bouffant fullness of 1830. 

The up-to-date Canadian designer who 
caters to an exclusive trade, is as fully 
sensible of the requirements of the Can- 
adian woman as is the buyer who selects 
the models on their behalf. He is aware 
that the Canadian woman wants the ut- 
most in smart apparel, yet modified in 
a certain indefinable manner to conciliate 
the opposing exigencies of climate, vari- 
ety of occupation and inherent conser- 
vatism which are unconsciously ex- 
pressed by the women of Canada. The 
designer has a tremendous responsibility 
upon his shoulders and the success of 
many a house rests upon his power of 
creating this subtle combination essential 
to the smart appearance of the future 
wearers. 

The collections of Spring vintage 
shown by Canadian houses are charac- 
terized by one common bond — they are 
one and all made up from the finest 
fabrics procurable, whether of cloth or 
silk, and are incomparable with respect 
to workmanship. Gone are the cheaply 
made and shoddy products of war time, 
made to satisfy the demand for anything 
at any price. Shrewd buying and the 
establishment of higher ideals in the 
matter of production have resulted in a 
surprising improvement all round, both 
in the quality of the fabrics employed 
and the workmanship. Never before, per- 
haps, has a manufacturer been able to 
point with pride to the models in his 
work rooms upon which may be found 
woven in the selvage of the material the 
name of a famous silk maker with his 
guarantee or the hitherto rare all silk 
bodice lining carefully finished as though 
by hand. Yet such is the case today in 
the line-up of models for Easter, 1921. 

Style the Vital Point 

In Canada, as in the United States, the 
comparative quietude existing in the 
ready-to-wear trade has had the effect 
of inducing manufacturers to concentrate 




Graceful Gown 

A soft pale grey crepe de chine model ex- 
ploiting the side surplice effect in silver 
lace, veiled with grey chiffon. 



more carefully than ever upon the im- 
portant question of style in the garments 
they produced, and to this end the great 
Paris dressmakers have evolved a per- 
ceptible yet not radical change in their 
Spring offerings which, it is anticipated, 
will be the deciding factor in influencing 
retailers to buy goods. Price, of course, 
is uppermost in everyone's mind, but 
style is a still more vital consideration, 
especially now that women are aware 
that Paris has decreed the wide revers 
and cut-away coats with long tails of the 
Directoire period, or the quaint puffed 
sleeves and oval neck line of the Empire 
styles. Millinery designers have already 
seized upon the characteristics of these 
periods in creating the Spring hats, and 
women of discriminating tastes will nat- 
urally endeavor to harmonize costume 



and hat at least, and may even go so far 
as to ask for the accessories such as were 
worn by Parisiennes of the eighteenth 
century. It remains to be seen whether 
the face curls and the Psyche knot style 
of hair dressing will follow in the wake 
of this development of fashion. 

It is interesting to note that the new 
lines modelled after these historic periods 
have a common inspiration with the true 
Directoire type of dress in that the latter 
were introduced as a measure of pre- 
caution during the French Revolution, 
during which anyone found wearing ex- 
travagant apparel was in danger of 
death. Following the riotous extrava- 
gance of the time of Louis XVI, natur- 
ally a reaction towards simplicity set in, 
and it is perhaps due to an over-indul- 
gence along the same lines in the past, 
which has led modern designers to shun 
anything suggestive of ostentatious dis- 
play and to adapt the Spring styles to 
the spirit of the times. 

Eighty Per Cent, of His Orders 

But to return to the question of Cana- 
dian made clothes. In so far as conditions 
in the garment industry in Montreal are 
concerned, Dry Goods Review was in- 
formed by a leading cloak and suit 
maker that fully 80 per cent, of his 
Spring orders have been received and he 
is working full time. He laid stress on 
the importance of getting all orders in 
early this season, for the reason that the 
workers will not work overtime later on, 
and therefore the manufacturer would 
sooner not accept delayed orders than 
promise delivery after a certain date. 
Repeat orders are even now beginning to 
arrive, and taken altogether, it is already 
apparent that the Spring season is doing 
its utmost to dissipate the feeling of 
gloom which threatened to envelope the 
ready-to-wear world. 

The general tendency to improve the 
standards of workmanship in women's 
garments is a step in the right direction, 
and marks an important step in advance. 
French clothes have excelled for so many 
years fully as much by reason of the 
artistic designing as because of the beau- 
tiful workmanship that goes into them. 
The desire to rush things through and 
get the job done quickly must be throt- 
tled by the maker who wishes to make 
garments that are not only good-looking 
at a distance but that will bear close-up 
inspection, and that will look as well at 
the end of the season as they did at the 
beginning. 

The Coat Frock 

Getting down to definite details re- 
garding the new models being shown 



Dry Goods Review 

this month, it is observed that dresses of 
the coat type are among the smartest of 
the street or tailored models for Spring, 
■employing serge, tricotine or taffeta. 
The coat dress range includes garments 
having long coats of the redingote type, 
bolero and Eton jacket effects and basque 
frocks. There is usually a vest or 
vestee in contrasting color, emphasizing 
the fact that the dress is of the coat type. 
Navy blue, black or the new beaver 
■brown shades are being offered in these 
street models, relieved with clever 
touches of vivid color, either in the way 
of a narrow embroidered galloon band- 
ing, embroidery or a facing of some dis- 
tinctly contrasting tone. The color note 
is often brought out by the sash or girdle 
alone, and as the prevailing fad is to 
feature a wide draped girdle placed be- 
low the normal waistline, infinite possi- 
bilities are available in the way of color 
contrast. The combination of tangerine 
or tomato with navy blue is very smart, 
and to be really up to date this Spring, 
either of these insistent shades must 
"be included in the Easter costume. 

Circular Line Noted 

The circular tendency heralded as the 
striking new style note is expressed in 
various ways. There is the conventional 
circular skirt, fitted about the hips and 
flaring widely at the hem, but this is 
only one of the many interpretations 
■of the mode. Just now, the fancy is for 
frilled effects, especially in taffetas, and 
-quantities of narrow ruffles are applied 
to the skirts of the dressier models, 
either round and round, slanting-wise, or 
■anywhere that the designer sees fit. The 
quaintest frock of this style noted in 
the workrooms of one Montreal maker 
•was named the "Martha Washington" 
and boasted nearly a dozen narrow rows 
of frilled taffeta upon its full skirt. The 
"hem of this model was finished after 
the fashion in France, namely, short 
at the sides and longer at the back 
than the front, permitting a glimpse of 
the under-facing of American Beauty 
which lined the lower edge for consider- 
able depth. Other seductive models were 
also seen which featured this idea, not- 
ably those in Canton crepe, which will 
undoubtedly take precedence over all 
other fabrics for dressy gowns. Beaver 
brown Canton with touches of tangerine 
was indescribably lovely and the pre- 
vailing demand for the all-grey gown 
was reflected in another model, embroid- 
ered heavily in self-colored chenille. 
•Grey was also combined with orange 
and other shades, leaving no doubt what- 
ever in the mind of the investigator as 
to the choice of colors favored by Dame 
Fashion this season. The vogue for 
taffeta will unquestionably increase to- 
wards Summer, as it is the one material 
which requires flare for best effect. The 
present models developed of this fabric 
are almost universally trimmed with 
large eyelet embroidery, used in pro- 
fusion all over the tunic, or else as a 
banding about the edges of sleeves, neck, 



R E A 1) Y -TO- W EAR 
• 

hem, etc. An all black model was 
heavily embroidered in this cut work, 
and the lower edge was deeply scal- 
loped to show the merest glimpse of a 
frothy petticoat of white net, much be- 
ribboned. 

Still another exquisite frock was of 
black taffeta, with a full overskirt, hav- 
ing a scalloped edge with a delicate 
oval insert of fine lace in each scallop 
and a basque waist terminating in frilled 
scallops with lace at the sleeves and 
neck. A tight underskirt peeped from 
beneath the tunic, while a tiny nosegay 
of French flowers formed the offsetting 
note of color. 

Choice Determines Styles. 

In cloth dresses the three-quarter 
sleeve is preferred in very smart models, 
while in formal silk frocks the extreme- 
ly short or e^bow length is much liked. 
There is no hard and fast rule about 
anything, however, and what one type 
of frock requires is taboo in another. 
The hall-marks of the latest models, 
however, are definitely stamped in three 



L57 

respects at least, the vogue for grey, 
the cult of the three-yard wide circular 
skirt and the decree that Canton crepe 
or any crepe finished silk is by all odds 
the smartest for feminine attire. 




Ruffled Silk Frock 

Quaintly beruffled spring frock of navy 
blue taffeta, embroidered with steel gray 
and laced with gray ribbons. The new ir- 
regular hem with short sides, showing a 
glimpse of contrasting color, is a novel fea- 
ture. 

Shown by courtesy of the S. & D. Dress 
Company, Montreal. 



SPRING ENCOURAGES NOVELTY 

Continued From Page 155. 

one of the new satin skirts in combina- 
tion with hosiery, slippers and hat of 
bright red. 

Another interesting novelty was a com- 
bination of georgette and white organdy. 
The latter was used to make the tiny 
crisp ruffles which formed the yoke and 
edged the sleeves and round neck. 

The circular skirt is the most pro- 
nounced new style note for Spring so far. 
It appears more frequently in separate 
skirt groups than in skirts designed as 
parts of suits or in dresses. When the 
circular skirt is made part of a suit, 
more frequently than not it is made of a 
different fabric than the coat, as for 
instance in the case of a sports suit seen 
recently. It combined a plaid skirt cut 
on widely circular lines with a plain 
fabric coat and was delightfully new. 
The circular tendency is especially ef- 
fective in plaid or striped fabrics. The 
material must be of a very firm weave, 
however, or no amount of clever cutting 
will avail to make the skirt hang- 
straight. It is said that washable skirts 
will not show this circular tendency un- 
less possibly they can be cut in such a 
way as to avoid bias, but the simple 
straight or pleated models are still very 
much called for, and will no doubt con- 
tinue to rival the new fad in popularity. 

An adorable costume for Summer wear 
featured a circular skirt of pale gray 
wool jersey cloth and a slip-over smock 
or blouse of henna-colored silk jersey. 
The skirt was faced with the henna in 
such a way that a mere cord of henna 
appeared as a finish at the edge of the 
skirt. 

Large plaids are re-appearing in regu- 
lation separate skirts for business or 
sports wear, particularly in the black and 
white combinations, stitched and pressec- 
down to conceal every trace of the white 
except when the wearer walks. The use 
of colored silk for stitching these models 
is growing. Dull blues, greens anr 
browns are also seen in combination with 
black. The deep fringed hem is still good 
for country wear and seems eminently 
suitable in combination with the new 
wool sweaters in white or harmonizing 
colors. 

The separate skirt, strictly speaking, 
takes second place this season to the 
three piece costume as a positive style 
feature. Parisiennes have declared that 
dresses shall have coats to transform 
them into suits, and suits must have 
blouses to transform them into dresses, 
and so on. It is therefore likely that as 
the season advances there will be a de- 
mand for other garments to accompany 
the separate skirt and thus achieve the 
costume effect so universally worn on the 
other side. 



L58 



Dry Goods Review 



Prime Essentials of Modern Display 

Judgment, Cood Taste and Knowledge of Color Harmony Are Reflected in Successfully 
Trimmed Store Window — Attractiveness Must Characterize Exhibits. 



I MUST admit frankly in the begin- 
ning that I am not a window dis- 
play expert, but simply one who 
tries to help in getting other people to 
make the most of their wares, by giving 
the public an opportunity through win- 
low displays to see and to appreciate 
not only the best in the fine arts, but 
the more modern achievements in the 
applied arts for which America is gain- 
ing recognition the world over. Beauti- 
fully designed products will at once 
secure an increased sale over the in- 
artistic product, for the disci'iminating 
individual, as well as he who cares only 
for utility, will buy. 

One of my objects in life is to co- 
operate in the stimulation of love for art 
in people's minds and souls, that the 
public may have a greater appreciation 
of things artistic and thus encourage the 
development of the best in the applied 
as well as the fine arts. 

In this connection I was much im- 
pressed with a remark made by Mr. Ed- 
win Rowland Blashfield in one of our 
Fifth Avenue week conferences when he 
said: "We have too many so-called 
works of art and too few works of crafts- 
manship." 

In Days of Old Bagdad 

There is no record of just when the 
show window was first used as an ad- 
junct to advertising. In old Bagdad 
arose the custom of exhibiting and sell- 
ing goods in open booths. Even now 
Bagdad's famous bazaars, despite her 
evolution in other ways, are conducted 
as they were a thousand years ago. A 
writer in the National Geographic Maga- 
zine of December, 1914, describing the 
bazaars of Bagdad, says: 

"Here is such a mob as Christ drove 
from the temple. If Herodotus came 
back he could see no change since his 
day. The shopping streets seem like tun- 
nels; they are arched overhead with brick 
to keep out the heat, thus they run like 
subways up and down the bazaar quar- 
ter. On each side are stalls no larger 
than telephone booths. Cross-legged in 
each booth, his wares piled high about 
him, sits the Arab or Jew trader. Brown 
women, their faces hid by yashmaks, up- 
set the ordered piles of goods and haggle 
shrilly." 

This picture presents a vivid contrast 
to the modern business thoroughfares of 
American cities with their wonderfully 
attractive show windows, but it is from 
these primitive methods of merchandis- 
ing that the profession of the expert 



decorator or display manager has been 
developed. 

Nor need we go outside of New York 
to find these ancient methods still in 
practice in all their picturesque sim- 
plicity. Here we find the peddler, who, 
like the packman in days of old, carries 
his goods on his back, going from house 
to house, and who has first to show his 
goods before he can interest prospective 
buyers. The dingy store in the crowded 
foreign settlements of the city is a re- 
minder of the bazaars of Bagdad or the 
old shops in Cheapside, London, where 
goods are displayed on a hanger outside 
the shop for want of a better method. 

The history of the development of the 
show window, which is really the history 



This article is presented as a spe- 
cial contribution to the readers of 
Dry Goods Review by Robt. Grier 
Cooke, President of the Fifth Ave- 
nue Association of New York City. 
The points brought out are based on 
a paper read by Mr. Cooke before 
the American Federation of Arts. 
While in Toronto last week he stat- 
ed to the editor that the power of 
the well-thought-out window display 
is appreciated today more, perhaps, 
than ever before. 



of merchandising, has yet to be written 
in its interesting detail, but in any big 
city the student may study it in all its 
stages and even find it embodied in the 
progress of some successful merchant 
who started as a peddler with his pack 
on his back. 

Creating a Favorable Impression 

Such a book would not be complete 
without a chapter on the old Bowery, 
which is still full of interesting mem- 
ories for many New Yorkers, who will 
find something of its atmosphere on 
Broadway in the Great White Light d